04-21-2014, 06:55 AM
#1
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Hello all, so do you restore brushes? How are you getting the knots out without damaging the handle? How are you resetting the knots? Should one even attempt? What were your outcomes? I've got brush, not sure what to do with it.

Thoughts?

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 04-21-2014, 07:20 AM
#2
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How to Remove a Badger/Boar knot from a handle Using Steam. ->


Here's one of my restore (actually my first one) -> http://shavenook.com/thread-my-first-rek...tgn-finest

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 04-22-2014, 09:17 AM
#3
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Restore means i bring it back as it was with the original items on it
For example i found a brush of my grandp,i clean it,i comb it etc and i make it look very good ready for use.
Reknot in more suitable word for what you want
Most of my today's brushes are reknoted,i have them in my blog
Welcome to "our" world,go ahead and try it !

Wink

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 05-05-2014, 07:57 PM
#4
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Thank you Emmanuel!


(04-21-2014, 07:20 AM)oversaturn Wrote: How to Remove a Badger/Boar knot from a handle Using Steam. -> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fv0bcIRz-CY

Here's one of my restore (actually my first one) -> http://shavenook.com/thread-my-first-rek...tgn-finest

Thanks for letting me know the distinction. Do you/Does one find brushes that can be brought back? I would think the knots would suffer most and first. I will check your blog out. Thanks so much for pointing me in the right direction. K



(04-22-2014, 09:17 AM)Doryferon Wrote: Restore means i bring it back as it was with the original items on it
For example i found a brush of my grandp,i clean it,i comb it etc and i make it look very good ready for use.
Reknot in more suitable word for what you want
Most of my today's brushes are reknoted,i have them in my blog
Welcome to "our" world,go ahead and try it !

Wink

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 05-06-2014, 02:15 AM
#5
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While the OP has your attention set on reknotting brushes, I have a few questions for you guys:

Are there batches of knots available now that have hooked tips? Has anyone purchased a 2-band knot from anywhere with these attributes within the last month?

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 05-06-2014, 06:21 AM
#6
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(05-06-2014, 02:15 AM)bmilcs Wrote: While the OP has your attention set on reknotting brushes, I have a few questions for you guys:

Are there batches of knots available now that have hooked tips? Has anyone purchased a 2-band knot from anywhere with these attributes within the last month?

I'm interested to know this as well... Smile

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 05-06-2014, 12:30 PM
#7
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The last few 2 band knots I've bought from TGN have had gel tips. Finest, F2, and 2 band super Finest. All within the last few months or so.
Most recently was an 18mm Finest, last month.

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 05-19-2014, 07:25 AM
#8
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Hooked tip? How does that work? And gel tips.....wouldn't that defeat the purpose of badger? And what are the advantages?

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 05-19-2014, 09:37 AM
#9
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I recently steamed out a knot, worked fine (assuming you don't forget it on the stove). Previously I've restored a few dozen brushes and always drilled the knots out. The only brushes this is a problem with are nylons, which tend to melt from the heat of drilling and can become quite a hassle to extract.

Bryan, the 30mm TGN finest I bought last month has hooked tips, as well as the traits I understand are common for these tips (a bit coarse dry but very soft wet, hairs clump together wet).

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 05-19-2014, 07:53 PM
#10
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+1 on the TGN finest, but it's not quite as soft as a Thater.

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 05-20-2014, 12:38 PM
#11
  • vferdman
  • Artisan
  • Western Massachusetts
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I always drill the old knots out after cutting most of the hair off with a sharp knife. To avoid old hair all over the place, I tape the old knot with masking tape from bottom to top, then I roll the brush under a very sharp knife getting progressively deeper towards the center. At the center the knot just falls off as a taped up bundle, which I discard. I then drill out the old stuff with an appropriately sized drill. I use a drill that's a few mm smaller in diameter than the knot and try to get a hole to go through the center of the old stump. Once I have a hole I use a rotary tool or my drill press with a sanding drum on it to get rid of the rest of the knot. If I need to get deeper opening for my new knot I use a grinding stone for the rotary tool to get deeper in. Depending on the handle and what the old knot was held with this can be easy or challenging. Many old handles used rubber to set the knot and that stuff is tough. Once I have the hole the way I want it (sometimes I I make the original hole a lot larger for a larger replacement knot) I dry fit the new knot to see what's going on. I usually like to have the hole drilled a few mm deeper than needed so I can adjust up with a penny or two. This gives me more control over the loft. Once I am happy with dry fit I epoxy the knot in. Do not use too much epoxy or it will come out and try to get into the hair of the knot on the outside. That's nasty, though not catastrophic. First of all, badger hair does not adhere to epoxy all that well and you can always work the cured epoxy loose. Secondly, rubbing alcohol is good for cleaning uncured epoxy off stuff. So have an alcohol soaked cotton ball handy. Best of all is to learn how much epoxy is just right and not get too much in there to begin with. This produces the most professional results.

Many people suggest boiling the old knot out, but I would recommend against it. Not all materials respond well to boiling and you may ruin the handle (don't ask me how I know this).

I have restored/re-knotted many, many brushes and results were amazingly good. Take a look.

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 05-20-2014, 04:08 PM
#12
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(05-20-2014, 12:38 PM)vferdman Wrote: I always drill the old knots out after cutting most of the hair off with a sharp knife. To avoid old hair all over the place, I tape the old knot with masking tape from bottom to top, then I roll the brush under a very sharp knife getting progressively deeper towards the center. At the center the knot just falls off as a taped up bundle, which I discard. I then drill out the old stuff with an appropriately sized drill. I use a drill that's a few mm smaller in diameter than the knot and try to get a hole to go through the center of the old stump. Once I have a hole I use a rotary tool or my drill press with a sanding drum on it to get rid of the rest of the knot. If I need to get deeper opening for my new knot I use a grinding stone for the rotary tool to get deeper in. Depending on the handle and what the old knot was held with this can be easy or challenging. Many old handles used rubber to set the knot and that stuff is tough. Once I have the hole the way I want it (sometimes I I make the original hole a lot larger for a larger replacement knot) I dry fit the new knot to see what's going on. I usually like to have the hole drilled a few mm deeper than needed so I can adjust up with a penny or two. This gives me more control over the loft. Once I am happy with dry fit I epoxy the knot in. Do not use too much epoxy or it will come out and try to get into the hair of the knot on the outside. That's nasty, though not catastrophic. First of all, badger hair does not adhere to epoxy all that well and you can always work the cured epoxy loose. Secondly, rubbing alcohol is good for cleaning uncured epoxy off stuff. So have an alcohol soaked cotton ball handy. Best of all is to learn how much epoxy is just right and not get too much in there to begin with. This produces the most professional results.

Many people suggest boiling the old knot out, but I would recommend against it. Not all materials respond well to boiling and you may ruin the handle (don't ask me how I know this).

I agree with you Vladimir and I use close to the same processes that you use with only minor variations. If your handle is modern acrylic steam can work well, but with other materials and older brushes you run too high of a risk of damage (don't ask me how I know this either!)

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 05-21-2014, 01:42 PM
#13
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The cheaper the acrylic the more difficult to work with it.
It's tough,can not predict it's behaviour,less endurance when the temperature goes higher,sharp points that sometimes can cut you ugly
Very difficult to repair it after a scratch,it's lighter than a quality one,his seam is often visible and sometimes shines a lot like glossy.

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 05-25-2014, 08:37 AM
#14
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Amazing pics. So I guessing there are some handles that went well, "I'm melting", "I'm melting". never thought of drilling it out and I can't imagine the hair flying all over the place. omg what a nightmare. Pretty funny if you don't have to clean it up.

Sort of like getting freshly made soap out of a pcv pipe with a air compressor. Too much pressure and you make flying soap bullets. luckily I can pass that story along without having seen them fly. Although, as long as I'm not cleaning up wouldn't mind seeing - lol.

For a patch I would think that an automative buffer - although small, might take it down or since, I had pumice and paraffin oil and a q-tip I think you might get close.

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 05-25-2014, 12:12 PM
#15
  • vferdman
  • Artisan
  • Western Massachusetts
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(05-25-2014, 08:37 AM)KLovgren Wrote: Amazing pics. So I guessing there are some handles that went well, "I'm melting", "I'm melting". never thought of drilling it out and I can't imagine the hair flying all over the place. omg what a nightmare. Pretty funny if you don't have to clean it up.

Sort of like getting freshly made soap out of a pcv pipe with a air compressor. Too much pressure and you make flying soap bullets. luckily I can pass that story along without having seen them fly. Although, as long as I'm not cleaning up wouldn't mind seeing - lol.

For a patch I would think that an automative buffer - although small, might take it down or since, I had pumice and paraffin oil and a q-tip I think you might get close.

I usually have a shop-vac set up close to the drill bit and most of the debris goes in there. Then I vacuum the rest up. In any case, it's my shop and if I can't make a mess there I won't get anything made Smile

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 05-25-2014, 05:36 PM
#16
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Exactly it's a shop. I think it was DaVinci who said the sculpture's house has dust and chips all through it. A painter's house is cleaner. lol chips and dust are sneaky devils.

And our new resin finish - goodness. it is used in marine applications from Holland - I believe it was invented as a dust magnate. The new oven is the new drying rack. No matter how much I cleaned there was dust. Inside the oven we're safe as long as no one turns on the oven. lol. actually there's painter's tape that goes over the controls - last year it got turned on and well, had to sand them back to wood. That'll learn ya!

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 05-27-2014, 04:10 AM
#17
  • vferdman
  • Artisan
  • Western Massachusetts
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(05-25-2014, 05:36 PM)KLovgren Wrote: Exactly it's a shop. I think it was DaVinci who said the sculpture's house has dust and chips all through it. A painter's house is cleaner. lol chips and dust are sneaky devils.

And our new resin finish - goodness. it is used in marine applications from Holland - I believe it was invented as a dust magnate. The new oven is the new drying rack. No matter how much I cleaned there was dust. Inside the oven we're safe as long as no one turns on the oven. lol. actually there's painter's tape that goes over the controls - last year it got turned on and well, had to sand them back to wood. That'll learn ya!

The grinding/cutting/turning, etc. needs to happen in a completely separate space from finishing. there is no doubt about that. I try to stay away from wood finishes that are super-high gloss as I simply can not achieve a dust-free environment at this moment. However re-knotting old brushes is a different activity than making new ones. This is why I do not hesitate to drill out old knots from brushes. A little and sometimes a lot of dust around my drill press is normal.

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