05-10-2014, 05:34 AM
#1
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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A perfect day's fishing for Luderick (Google it, folks). This spot is called Cape Banks, and is basically the northern headland to Sydney's Botany Bay. I also fish with vintage gear, but sorry, no pictures. I landed and released quite a few of these beautiful fish; 'lipped' because I use special hooks and also crimp the barb.

The bay area just to the right (the second picture) is called Cruwee Cove, and is the spot where the Aboriginal man, Cruwee, was standing when Captain James Cook, and the famous botanist Joseph Banks, sailed past on the Endeavour, into Botany Bay.

The little spit is where I fish from, usually have the place to myself, but the two guys remaining there were still trying to work out how I hauled some pretty, fighting fish out of the water using 'weird' gear, tiny weeny sneck hooks and weeny strips of the seaweed Ulva Lattuca or sea lettuce.



[Image: Re9CaSO.jpg]
[Image: nchCNk0.jpg]

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 05-10-2014, 05:56 AM
#2
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Nicely done Smile. A beautiful scene!

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

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 05-10-2014, 08:26 AM
#3
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Beautiful, Shaun. I haven't been to Sydney or Melbourne for 34 years and would love to get back.

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 05-12-2014, 02:27 PM
#4
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Interesting.


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 05-12-2014, 03:28 PM
#5
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Yes, not a bad clip. I use a longer rod as I am higher up and have a lot more rubble in front of me so landing the fish is very difficult. I also use a far smaller bait and a tinier hook with the barb crimped. When I went out the day the above pic was taken, I had a 'down' with every cast practically. Landed a few; lost a few at the very last. Personally I don't think they are good eating fish at all, but they were a staple during the depression as I understand it, and it was around then that the art of catching luderick or blackfish was developed. The reel is also a bit special; I use the Alvey blackfish side-cast reel. I have about 6 of these but my favourite is my restored wooden blackfish reel; narrow spool; releases line easily allow the foot to drift freely. The terminal tackle is also rather special, with the use of lead (or an environmentally-friendly alternative) down the leader to the hook. Balancing the float correctly in the water, which can be choppy, is crucial: too high in the water: fish take a nibble, feel resistance and spit it out...too much and you can't see what's going on. It's an intense form of fishing that requires very strong focus and concentration, both on the float, the sea and the elements in general. Being off the rocks, it can be hazardous if you don't know how to read the sea or take the necessary precautions. My rule is simple: if there are barnacles where you're standing, and there is no escape route behind you for quick exit in case of a big wave: don't fish there.

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 05-12-2014, 09:50 PM
#6
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Lots of "foods" are discovered under intense conditions.

I understand cat was eaten in France during WW2, and I had a chance to try it, quite by an accident of not knowing enough French when I was visiting there. Not the best sandwich fare. That's all I'll say about that. One does what one must.

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 05-14-2014, 07:38 PM
#7
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Lovely location!

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 05-15-2014, 01:10 PM
#8
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Excellent video and the location is beautiful too!!
Thank you for posting!!

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 05-15-2014, 04:07 PM
#9
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Yes, it is beautiful. I am very often the only one there, too, even though it's not that far from central Sydney, unbelievably. It's my little escape.

Highlights for me at that spot was watching penguins swimming underwater at my feet, and dolphins too. On the other side of the headland in the open water, we have humpbacks and calves, too, on their long migrations twice a year up and down the coast. One whale and calf were right in close a couple of years ago, just resting up. I could see their eyes looking at me. Yes, that close. Really fantastic. Only me, and them.

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