05-21-2014, 02:42 PM
#1
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I've been thinking about this since I started using a DE but never asked and I could be completely wrong. I'll throw it out there since I know you'll read this with an open mind.

Let's take a Merkur 34c which is perceived as a mild razor. If you have the correct angle going ATG on your final pass (assuming pressure, lather, blade, etc are all correct as to remove those variables so we can only critique the function of a razor), can we agree that it could provide a perfect BBS? If so, what would a razor with a larger blade gap or sharper angle do for you? More blade gap would give a larger range of degrees that the blade would be in contact with the skin. That seems like there is just a greater chance to cause irritation.

Wouldn't the perfect razor be one where there is one angle that cuts perfectly and if you have it at any other angle you will not have contact with skin? It would ensure an irritation free shave assuming no added pressure is used. If you have stubble left over, that just means you had the incorrect angle in those spots. You could also argue that it would take much more technique with a razor like this because to get a BBS you'd have to keep your angle the entire shave. This would be useful especially for shavers that switched to DE in search of an irritation free close shave.

Am I missing something or does this make sense?

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 05-21-2014, 03:19 PM
#2
  • Crag
  • Senior Member
  • Menifee, Ca 92586
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Sounds like an interesting project. I nominate you to build one...I'd likely at least try it out for you...Biggrin

I think the logic is sound but the application could be flawed, because there are so many preferences with regard to face feel of the razor...take for example Slants...some slants have alot of exposure and some not so much, but in the right hands all of them become excellent shave tools.

There is no one right razor, and people will be divided on how and what works best for them...

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 05-21-2014, 03:24 PM
#3
  • PR82
  • Active Member
  • California, US
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YMMV.

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 05-21-2014, 03:29 PM
#4
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I think people's beards differ in terms of the orientation of the hairs (how much they lay down or retract into the skin), and how thick the hairs are, or what the hairs are like (i.e. what angle they like to be chopped at).

I don't know that for sure, but it could be the source of the whole "YMMV" philosophy.

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 05-21-2014, 04:11 PM
#5
  • Stubbl E
  • Senior Member
  • Lake Tahoe, California
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Side curtain airbags for DE razors? Possibly.

Best add a couple of extra cup holders as well...Biggrin

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 05-21-2014, 04:47 PM
#6
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Thanks guys, yes extra wide cup holders.

I eliminated RAD early on and only kept my Futur. I always ask myself what's the point of adjusting it. Bigger blade gap is referred to as giving it a bigger sweet spot, but is it really so sweet? It just seems like more room for error. Then I wish I could adjust it lower than 1 to test this theory but then why not have a razor that is set that way to begin with.

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 05-21-2014, 05:21 PM
#7
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(05-21-2014, 02:42 PM)Shakamoto Wrote: Wouldn't the perfect razor be one where there is one angle that cuts perfectly and if you have it at any other angle you will not have contact with skin?

Am I missing something or does this make sense?

Some people are already exploring this Angel,

but, this type of setup isn't for everyone.

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 05-21-2014, 05:28 PM
#8
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(05-21-2014, 05:21 PM)RazoRock_Joe Wrote:
(05-21-2014, 02:42 PM)Shakamoto Wrote: Wouldn't the perfect razor be one where there is one angle that cuts perfectly and if you have it at any other angle you will not have contact with skin?

Am I missing something or does this make sense?

Some people are already exploring this Angel,

but, this type of setup isn't for everyone.

Yes, that did come to mind. Very ingenious design, although I haven't tried it. That's what appears you were going for from user reviews. Was that the premise?

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 05-21-2014, 08:19 PM
#9
  • CMur12
  • Semogueiro de Coração
  • Moses Lake, Washington State, USA
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A very mild razor, such as a Gillette Tech, has a very narrow blade gap. The result is that the blade angle has to be just right get an effective cut. With a narrow blade gap, there is little risk of scraping. This is the closest you will get to a razor that will that simply cut or not cut, with minimal risk of scraping. A more aggressive razor will typically have a wider blade gap, effective angle for the cut will be less critical, and the risk of scraping the skin will increase.

Merkur razors with a fixed head are not what I would call mild. I would rate them as moderate, possibly a little to the aggressive side of moderate. They're too aggressive for me, so I consider them aggressive for my purposes. Since more aggressive razors are coming to market in recent years, our definition of mild-to-aggressive may be shifting.

- Murray

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 05-22-2014, 05:30 PM
#10
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(05-21-2014, 08:19 PM)CMur12 Wrote: A very mild razor, such as a Gillette Tech, has a very narrow blade gap. The result is that the blade angle has to be just right get an effective cut. With a narrow blade gap, there is little risk of scraping. This is the closest you will get to a razor that will that simply cut or not cut, with minimal risk of scraping. A more aggressive razor will typically have a wider blade gap, effective angle for the cut will be less critical, and the risk of scraping the skin will increase.

Merkur razors with a fixed head are not what I would call mild. I would rate them as moderate, possibly a little to the aggressive side of moderate. They're too aggressive for me, so I consider them aggressive for my purposes. Since more aggressive razors are coming to market in recent years, our definition of mild-to-aggressive may be shifting.

- Murray


+1

That is a reason that the Tech was the best selling and longest manufactured razor by Gillette.

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 05-23-2014, 04:40 AM
#11
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I have often thought the same as the point you have made. A mild razor should shave just as close as an aggressive razor. An aggressive razor has more chance for irritation.
The first time I used a Feather blade was in a Merkur razor. I thought the blade gave a smooth close shave. But when I use the Feather blade in a more aggressive razor, I get irritation from the blade.
So as you implied, a more aggressive razor is more apt to cause more problems.
........

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 05-23-2014, 04:10 PM
#12
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(05-23-2014, 04:40 AM)shave/brush Wrote: I have often thought the same as the point you have made. A mild razor should shave just as close as an aggressive razor. An aggressive razor has more chance for irritation.
The first time I used a Feather blade was in a Merkur razor. I thought the blade gave a smooth close shave. But when I use the Feather blade in a more aggressive razor, I get irritation from the blade.
So as you implied, a more aggressive razor is more apt to cause more problems.
........

Thanks, a little relief there are others.

The ideal razor for me would be a slant with as steep a blade angle as possible so the handle can be held more parallel to the skin with the blade gap described above. *Hint* to any razor makers out there.

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 05-29-2014, 06:00 PM
#13
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(05-21-2014, 02:42 PM)Shakamoto Wrote: Wouldn't the perfect razor be one where there is one angle that cuts perfectly and if you have it at any other angle you will not have contact with skin? It would ensure an irritation free shave assuming no added pressure is used. If you have stubble left over, that just means you had the incorrect angle in those spots. You could also argue that it would take much more technique with a razor like this because to get a BBS you'd have to keep your angle the entire shave. This would be useful especially for shavers that switched to DE in search of an irritation free close shave.

Am I missing something or does this make sense?

that more or less sums up my experience with the feather AS-D2. it is reported by many to be a 'mild' razor, but i've received the best, closest shaves of my life with it.. most similar in feel to a Gillette Tech, in my experience.

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 05-30-2014, 12:41 AM
#14
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
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I don't know if this is to the point but I get as close a shave with my Blue Tips as any thing else. I've got Red Tips, used Slants.... I've always wondered how can that be? My beard, I've been told by barbers who've given me a shave, is just on the heavy side of average.

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 05-30-2014, 06:41 AM
#15
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(05-21-2014, 02:42 PM)Shakamoto Wrote: I've been thinking about this since I started using a DE but never asked and I could be completely wrong. I'll throw it out there since I know you'll read this with an open mind.

Let's take a Merkur 34c which is perceived as a mild razor. If you have the correct angle going ATG on your final pass (assuming pressure, lather, blade, etc are all correct as to remove those variables so we can only critique the function of a razor), can we agree that it could provide a perfect BBS? If so, what would a razor with a larger blade gap or sharper angle do for you? More blade gap would give a larger range of degrees that the blade would be in contact with the skin. That seems like there is just a greater chance to cause irritation.

Wouldn't the perfect razor be one where there is one angle that cuts perfectly and if you have it at any other angle you will not have contact with skin? It would ensure an irritation free shave assuming no added pressure is used. If you have stubble left over, that just means you had the incorrect angle in those spots. You could also argue that it would take much more technique with a razor like this because to get a BBS you'd have to keep your angle the entire shave. This would be useful especially for shavers that switched to DE in search of an irritation free close shave.

Am I missing something or does this make sense?

My feeling is that the wider blade gap allows you to get the job done with fewer strokes. The safety bar in a mild razor limits the blade's access to your face. The wider gap lowers these limits.

My first DE razor (that wasn't defective) was the 34C. My favorite became the 37C because (I think) it gives me the best of both worlds. The safety bar is slanted. The side where the blade is most exposed is helpful with neck hair that's hard to reach.

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 06-03-2014, 09:21 AM
#16
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The ideal razor for me would be a slant with as steep a blade angle as possible so the handle can be held more parallel to the skin with the blade gap described above. *Hint* to any razor makers out there.
[/quote]

You just described the RazoRock Stealth Slant and I have no tie in with these folk.
The efficiencies of the slant razor are present but the approach angle is quite narrow, many users noted the handle is nearly parallel to their face.
The razor appears to be quite mild because of this narrow, refined cutting angle.
I found the light weight of this alloy razor quite disconcerting after using razors weighing double the scale readout.
The temptation to use pressure on this razor is nearly overwhelming, but is not required. If you have the correct angle, the razor simply and efficiently removes all stubble and sings a sweet song as you do it.

Bill

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 06-03-2014, 10:01 AM
#17
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My take on a perfect angle is that it varies from person to person.
It depends in the direction of the hair growth (some have it stick out, sine it rubs flat against the skin) skin elasticity, etc.

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 06-08-2014, 06:12 PM
#18
  • Java
  • Active Member
  • Warner Robins, Georgia, USA
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You're absolutely right, I used to feel the same way. I mean why risk razor burn when you don't have to. I also agree with whoever said that razor is already made, in the Gilette Tech. I even started a thread about how everyone should start with one. The problem was, everyone has an off day once in a while, and holding that perfect angle can be a chore sometimes. I can do 5 or 6 perfectly comfortable passes with my Tech, and some mornings it took that many! There are limits to how much time I can spend getting ready every morning, and I'm basically lazy, so I broke down and put a shim I'm my Tech. The shim brings it up into 34c territory, aggression wise. Yes, I have be slightly more careful with pressure, but my shaves go a lot faster, because I can be slightly less careful with my angle.
So yeah, I can get a BBS with next to no risk with the mildest of razors, but after for giving it an honest try for maybe a hundred shaves, I decided for me, a "moderate" razor is worth what little added risk it represents.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 06-08-2014, 06:46 PM
#19
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different people = different tastes = different preferences
this is why there are endless varieties of a single object available. most of us take shaving as a hobby. some people seek comfort out of hobbies and some adventure. moreover, a lot depends on the skin type and beard thickness too.

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