06-02-2014, 05:22 AM
#1
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[Image: WMelZXo.jpg]I thought I'd share my homemade shave cream recipe. It's easy to make and inexpensive. Coupled with that it lathers well. You can easily cut the recipe in half if you'd like. You can also divide your batch prior to adding the essential oils to make different scents. Another point I'd like to make. If you'd like a more soap base consistency then mix it slow. For a whipped cream consistency turn it up and whip it good. PDF - Shave Cream Recipe

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 06-02-2014, 05:58 AM
#2
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What purpose does the sugar serve?

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 06-02-2014, 06:01 AM
#3
  • Giorgio
  • Senior Member
  • Pennsylvania, US
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Very interesting method of making shave soap, thanks for sharing Biggrin!

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 06-02-2014, 07:00 AM
#4
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Seems like this is a non-lathering cream, is that correct?

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 06-02-2014, 08:09 AM
#5
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(06-02-2014, 05:58 AM)Starkicker Wrote: What purpose does the sugar serve?
The sugar used with coconut oil is suppose to make the lather "scrumptious". I have read this on a few web sites. Here's one I found.

http://www.northcountrymercantile.com/so...milk-soap/

This was a great question cause it made me think about whether or not honey could work. As it is great for the skin as well and it has preservative properties. I'll have to try it sometime.

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 06-02-2014, 08:12 AM
#6
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Sugar + soap does boost the lather. It's part of the reason that adding glycerin can give a tired lather a boost. And a reason to add it to soaps beyond skin conditioning.

Not sure if that works along w/ borax, though.

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 06-02-2014, 08:13 AM
#7
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(06-02-2014, 07:00 AM)Songwind Wrote: Seems like this is a non-lathering cream, is that correct?

Actually it lathers quite well. I have used both Razorock and Proraso in the past and feel this recipe meets the test of similarity to both of these products. Here's some pics for you. The 1st is a over-loaded brush with the cream. I should have used half the amount and in the bottom of the dish I should have added at least twice as much water. The other 2 pics show what was produced after approximately 2 minutes of agitating. I lost some product in the sink and I also cleaned off the outside of the dish as well as the brush to make for a more appealing picture.

[Image: 1p124nb]
[Image: 1p12n1t]
[Image: 1kqfrfZ]

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 06-02-2014, 12:29 PM
#8
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Interesting. I'm curious about adding Borax. You see Borax in conjunction with beeswax, both being used together as an emulsifying agent, usually in lotions or creams. Kind of old school and tricky but doable. Borax isn't very stable for long term emulsification as it will separate. Much better to use an emulsifying wax for the job.

Borax is a weak alkaline so it could be saponifying some of the oil/stearic acid but the resulting cream, lotion or in this case cream soap will always be alkaline. Lotions that are made using Borax are not very nice to the skin, the more lotion you use, the more lotion you need.

I have a limited knowledge of Borax being used in soap other than a laundry soap and that is generally added to lower the pH to buffer hard water. I'm very curious as to to it's use in this recipe. Hopefully someone with a better understanding in chemistry will come along and explain this for me.

I have been working on a shaving cream soap for about 7 months now and it is a very different process than the one described here.

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 06-02-2014, 01:05 PM
#9
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(06-02-2014, 12:29 PM)ColdRiverSoap Wrote: Interesting. I'm curious about adding Borax. You see Borax in conjunction with beeswax, both being used together as an emulsifying agent, usually in lotions or creams. Kind of old school and tricky but doable. Borax isn't very stable for long term emulsification as it will separate. Much better to use an emulsifying wax for the job.

Borax is a weak alkaline so it could be saponifying some of the oil/stearic acid but the resulting cream, lotion or in this case cream soap will always be alkaline. Lotions that are made using Borax are not very nice to the skin, the more lotion you use, the more lotion you need.

I have a limited knowledge of Borax being used in soap other than a laundry soap and that is generally added to lower the pH to buffer hard water. I'm very curious as to to it's use in this recipe. Hopefully someone with a better understanding in chemistry will come along and explain this for me.

I have been working on a shaving cream soap for about 7 months now and it is a very different process than the one described here.

You make some very interesting points. First on my initial batch I did have some separation (clear liquid) after the product cooled. I put everything back into the mixer and stirred again and it has held together without separation. That is why I recommended to wait until it has cooled until the final beat process.

You mentioned about using a emulsifying wax. Do you have any recommendations? I'm willing to make changes if there is something better to use.

You stated that you hope that someone smarter than you would come along. Me too. After reading your post I said this guy is smarter than me about this stuff. I hope someone weighs in on and critique the heck out of it so we can make better for all.

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 06-02-2014, 03:23 PM
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(06-02-2014, 01:05 PM)mfcarpino Wrote: You make some very interesting points. First on my initial batch I did have some separation (clear liquid) after the product cooled. I put everything back into the mixer and stirred again and it has held together without separation. That is why I recommended to wait until it has cooled until the final beat process.

You mentioned about using a emulsifying wax. Do you have any recommendations? I'm willing to make changes if there is something better to use.

You stated that you hope that someone smarter than you would come along. Me too. After reading your post I said this guy is smarter than me about this stuff. I hope someone weighs in on and critique the heck out of it so we can make better for all.

You can use the emulsifying wax of your choice. The easiest to use is E wax or Polawax, basically versions of a NF (National Foundry) wax. Most soap or lotion supply houses carry it in one form or another. It is relatively inexpensive and used at 3-6% total weight of your recipe. There are also others such as Polysorbate 20 and Ceteareth 20 which is very stable when used in conjunction with glyceryl stearate.

I would investigate further the role Borax is playing in your recipe first. It may be as I suggested doing two things, saponifying the coconut oil/stearic acid to a degree as well as acting as a weak emulsification agent.

Good luck and let us know how you make out!

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