05-14-2012, 05:48 PM
#1
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Where to begin...
The handle is nice and very comfortable.
The brush is new, so I expect it to be stiff until it breaks in, but it's not so bad.
However, I can feel the top of the knot plug. It makes me nervous, but doesn't effect the performance--unless it falls off.

[Image: SEM04.jpg]
The red line is where I can feel the top of the plug. It's about .50" above the ring. I have no clue how deep the knot is set into the handle or if it's just attached to the top. It feels like it was put together wrong.

The brush is large, but doesn't splay wildly. It's very picky to the point that it's annoying. So far, I'm not impressed.

[Image: SEM01.jpg]
Large bloom, but it's still damp and should close up.

The knot is dense, but doesn't hog the lather. It works both soaps a creams, but handles soaps very well.

[Image: SEM02.jpg]
I measured the bloom, 3" from side to side. Oddly, it doesn't feel large on the face.

How do I feel so far?
Not impressed at all. This is the poorest performing brush I've used out of the box. The Omega Scarlatti was much better right off the bat. Again, the way the knot is set into/onto the handle really makes me nervous.

I really hope it loses the picky feeling quickly, because it's very uncomfortable. I'll keep using it, but if it's not up to par by the 10th use I'm taking the knot off to see how they set it. I honestly think that it's set just below the ring. Maybe to prevent water from penetrating the wood? I have no clue. Either way, it doesn't feel secure.

Does anyone else feel the plug in theirs?
Do they all start off picky--not scritchy, picky?

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 05-14-2012, 06:02 PM
#2
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I have heard these take time to break in and don't lather very well until they do.

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 05-14-2012, 07:07 PM
#3
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I have a SOC boar with a few test lathers on it as well as a few shaves. I'm thankful to say that my experience is the opposite of yours. Did you follow Teiste's recommended process for breaking in a boar? I did and it's felt fairly soft at the tips from the first time it touched my face. I'm sure it will soften more, but I certainly wouldn't call it prickly. The SOC 2-band, now that starts prickly, but it's softening nicely.

Are you sure you're feeling the knot plug & not just the compressed density of all those bristles as they enter the narrowed ring? These are dense brushes with thick bristles. It also sounds like you might not have soaked the brush long enough. It's possible you got a bad brush, but I'd give it some more time for the two of you to get acquainted before you consider deknotification.

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 05-14-2012, 07:35 PM
#4
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I got the brush and soaked it for about 20 minutes, gave it a squeeze and a shake then hung it to dry. After it was dry, I gave it a short soak then lathered some soap to get the stink out, rinsed, dried it with a towel and let it dry to slightly damp then brushed my hand while watching a movie. By the time the movie was over the brush was dry. I hung it and used it about 14 hours later. My bathroom is really dry, so things don't take long to dry.

The thing I feel could be the bristles, didn't think of that. What ever it is it's really firm. I'm patient, I'll endure the picks until it softens up. If it's still to picky after some use, I don't know what I'll do.

Thanks for the reply.

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 05-14-2012, 07:44 PM
#5
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(05-14-2012, 07:35 PM)Johnny9 Wrote: I got the brush and soaked it for about 20 minutes, gave it a squeeze and a shake then hung it to dry. After it was dry, I gave it a short soak then lathered some soap to get the stink out, rinsed, dried it with a towel and let it dry to slightly damp then brushed my hand while watching a movie. By the time the movie was over the brush was dry. I hung it and used it about 14 hours later. My bathroom is really dry, so things don't take long to dry.

The thing I feel could be the bristles, didn't think of that. What ever it is it's really firm. I'm patient, I'll endure the picks until it softens up. If it's still to picky after some use, I don't know what I'll do.

Thanks for the reply.

With the density of this brush I wouldn't soak it for less than 20 minutes before using it on your face. The more of the bristles that you submerge (up to 1cm below the base according to Bruno) the softer it can be. I look forward to hearing your continued thoughts on this brush.

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 05-14-2012, 08:46 PM
#6
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I have both of the SOC brushes and I can attest the boar takes a very long time to break in. Even the badger needs time to soften up. Give them time, more than you would a different new brush. They seem to need a long time to get just right. Hopefully this means a long life for the brushes.

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 05-14-2012, 08:46 PM
#7
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John,
i had a SOC in Cherry wood and it was fantastic. The bristles were quite soft after breaking in, but i never noticed the knot being set as yours is. If you are worried, can you contact the seller to get an exchange? These are usually great brushes, in my opinion.
Good luck.

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 05-14-2012, 08:54 PM
#8
  • CMur12
  • Semogueiro de Coração
  • Moses Lake, Washington State, USA
User Info
The resin plug in all Semogue brushes extends above the metal ring/cup. This means that the brushhead is very well secured and that you won't get water down into the knot.

I haven't tried an SOC boar but the denser the brush the longer it seems to take to break it in. I got an 830, which is denser than my favorite 1305. I grumbled along the way breaking it in, unimpressed with the brush and insisting that there was no reason to make a denser version of the 1305. The 830 took 25 - 30 latherings before it really broke in and showed what it could do. (Note that I lather in a smooth bowl and I don't work my brushes very hard, so you may require fewer lathering sessions for the same result.) Now it's my favorite boar brush.

I would anticipate that the SOC boar would require a lot of breaking in to reveal its true potential.

- Murray

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 05-14-2012, 09:11 PM
#9
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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I have a SOC, same handle, but badger not boar and it's a beautiful brush. Certainly not scratchy and I couldn't imagine having to soak any brush for 20 minutes, mines lucky to see 20 seconds (but that's all it needs!)

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 05-14-2012, 09:45 PM
#10
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(05-14-2012, 08:54 PM)CMur12 Wrote: The resin plug in all Semogue brushes extends above the metal ring/cup. This means that the brushhead is very well secured and that you won't get water down into the knot.

I haven't tried an SOC boar but the denser the brush the longer it seems to take to break it in. I got an 830, which is denser than my favorite 1305. I grumbled along the way breaking it in, unimpressed with the brush and insisting that there was no reason to make a denser version of the 1305. The 830 took 25 - 30 latherings before it really broke in and showed what it could do. (Note that I lather in a smooth bowl and I don't work my brushes very hard, so you may require fewer lathering sessions for the same result.) Now it's my favorite boar brush.

I would anticipate that the SOC boar would require a lot of breaking in to reveal its true potential.

- Murray

Thanks Murray, the plug issue had me nervous, I was afraid I would snap it off, I'm relieved to know they're designed that way. The brush is packed very tight, it's without a doubt the most dense brush I own.

After some reading and a little belated common sense, I realised that it's going to take some time for this monster to break in. I'll be sure to use it when my face feels 50 grit. lol

Thanks to everyone for the input.

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 05-15-2012, 03:11 AM
#11
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(05-14-2012, 09:11 PM)ben74 Wrote: I have a SOC, same handle, but badger not boar and it's a beautiful brush. Certainly not scratchy and I couldn't imagine having to soak any brush for 20 minutes, mines lucky to see 20 seconds (but that's all it needs!)

Um, boar behaves differently than badger. It needs a soak or else you may break the bristles. Once broken in 20 minutes may be excessive, but it will certainly need more than a rinse like any badger can handle. Just different properties of the hair.

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 05-15-2012, 03:38 AM
#12
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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(05-15-2012, 03:11 AM)SharpSpine Wrote:
(05-14-2012, 09:11 PM)ben74 Wrote: I have a SOC, same handle, but badger not boar and it's a beautiful brush. Certainly not scratchy and I couldn't imagine having to soak any brush for 20 minutes, mines lucky to see 20 seconds (but that's all it needs!)

Um, boar behaves differently than badger. It needs a soak or else you may break the bristles. Once broken in 20 minutes may be excessive, but it will certainly need more than a rinse like any badger can handle. Just different properties of the hair.

I've also read that boar hair is more prone to breaking (than badger). Any truth to that?

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 05-15-2012, 04:21 AM
#13
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(05-15-2012, 03:38 AM)ben74 Wrote: I've also read that boar hair is more prone to breaking (than badger). Any truth to that?

not in my experience so far... if it is, it's probably marginal difference.

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 05-15-2012, 04:38 AM
#14
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(05-15-2012, 03:38 AM)ben74 Wrote:
(05-15-2012, 03:11 AM)SharpSpine Wrote:
(05-14-2012, 09:11 PM)ben74 Wrote: I have a SOC, same handle, but badger not boar and it's a beautiful brush. Certainly not scratchy and I couldn't imagine having to soak any brush for 20 minutes, mines lucky to see 20 seconds (but that's all it needs!)

Um, boar behaves differently than badger. It needs a soak or else you may break the bristles. Once broken in 20 minutes may be excessive, but it will certainly need more than a rinse like any badger can handle. Just different properties of the hair.

I've also read that boar hair is more prone to breaking (than badger). Any truth to that?

If you use it improperly, then sure. Boar hairs need to soak in water so that they become fully hydrated & saturated with water. This gives them more flexibility than when dry. The amount of stiffness/backbone can then be somewhat controlled by the user. Soak longer or shorter, submerge more or less of the knot to soak. All these will allow you to get the characteristics you want out of the brush; within a certain parameter of course.

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 05-15-2012, 04:42 AM
#15
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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(05-15-2012, 04:38 AM)SharpSpine Wrote:
(05-15-2012, 03:38 AM)ben74 Wrote:
(05-15-2012, 03:11 AM)SharpSpine Wrote: Um, boar behaves differently than badger. It needs a soak or else you may break the bristles. Once broken in 20 minutes may be excessive, but it will certainly need more than a rinse like any badger can handle. Just different properties of the hair.

I've also read that boar hair is more prone to breaking (than badger). Any truth to that?

If you use it improperly, then sure. Boar hairs need to soak in water so that they become fully hydrated & saturated with water. This gives them more flexibility than when dry. The amount of stiffness/backbone can then be somewhat controlled by the user. Soak longer or shorter, submerge more or less of the knot to soak. All these will allow you to get the characteristics you want out of the brush; within a certain parameter of course.

Sounds like the user is able to exert more control over the way a boar performs.

A stark contrast to badger, interesting...

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 05-15-2012, 05:33 AM
#16
  • Brent
  • Active Member
  • Columbus, OH
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(05-15-2012, 04:42 AM)ben74 Wrote:
(05-15-2012, 04:38 AM)SharpSpine Wrote:
(05-15-2012, 03:38 AM)ben74 Wrote: I've also read that boar hair is more prone to breaking (than badger). Any truth to that?

If you use it improperly, then sure. Boar hairs need to soak in water so that they become fully hydrated & saturated with water. This gives them more flexibility than when dry. The amount of stiffness/backbone can then be somewhat controlled by the user. Soak longer or shorter, submerge more or less of the knot to soak. All these will allow you to get the characteristics you want out of the brush; within a certain parameter of course.

Sounds like the user is able to exert more control over the way a boar performs.

A stark contrast to badger, interesting...

I would have thought with all your brushes you would have had one boar sneak in there. Maybe it's time for you to give one a try to see how it is?

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 05-15-2012, 05:50 AM
#17
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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One more time:

Soak bristles in warm water about half way up the boar between 15-20 before using. When you are ready to lather, just pick up the brush and let if naturally drip excess water out, do not shake. Build your lather adding water as needed.

After shaving, rinse well in warm water, shake out excess, rinse again and shake out excess water. I personally do not squeeze the bristles, just shake. I also do not towel dry. Again, just my preference. Hang bristle down and let it dry overnight.

The SOC takes a minimum of 20-30 shaves to break-in.

That knot you feel is normal on Semogue brushes. All of mine have it. They are packed very tight, even the smaller brushes.

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 05-15-2012, 05:55 AM
#18
  • ben74
  • Administrator
  • Perth, Australia
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(05-15-2012, 05:33 AM)Brent Wrote:
(05-15-2012, 04:42 AM)ben74 Wrote:
(05-15-2012, 04:38 AM)SharpSpine Wrote: If you use it improperly, then sure. Boar hairs need to soak in water so that they become fully hydrated & saturated with water. This gives them more flexibility than when dry. The amount of stiffness/backbone can then be somewhat controlled by the user. Soak longer or shorter, submerge more or less of the knot to soak. All these will allow you to get the characteristics you want out of the brush; within a certain parameter of course.

Sounds like the user is able to exert more control over the way a boar performs.

A stark contrast to badger, interesting...

I would have thought with all your brushes you would have had one boar sneak in there. Maybe it's time for you to give one a try to see how it is?

Well, I'm trying to get myself talked in to acquiring one! Tongue

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 05-15-2012, 05:57 AM
#19
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(05-14-2012, 08:54 PM)CMur12 Wrote: The resin plug in all Semogue brushes extends above the metal ring/cup. This means that the brushhead is very well secured and that you won't get water down into the knot.

I haven't tried an SOC boar but the denser the brush the longer it seems to take to break it in. I got an 830, which is denser than my favorite 1305. I grumbled along the way breaking it in, unimpressed with the brush and insisting that there was no reason to make a denser version of the 1305. The 830 took 25 - 30 latherings before it really broke in and showed what it could do. (Note that I lather in a smooth bowl and I don't work my brushes very hard, so you may require fewer lathering sessions for the same result.) Now it's my favorite boar brush.

I would anticipate that the SOC boar would require a lot of breaking in to reveal its true potential.

- Murray

Murray, thank you for the information regarding the resin plug. I was not aware of this but after checking all of my Semogues it is clear that I feel something there. I just always attributed it to all the hairs being compressed and dense as they got closer to the handle.

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 05-15-2012, 10:49 AM
#20
  • Brent
  • Active Member
  • Columbus, OH
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(05-15-2012, 05:55 AM)ben74 Wrote:
(05-15-2012, 05:33 AM)Brent Wrote:
(05-15-2012, 04:42 AM)ben74 Wrote: Sounds like the user is able to exert more control over the way a boar performs.

A stark contrast to badger, interesting...

I would have thought with all your brushes you would have had one boar sneak in there. Maybe it's time for you to give one a try to see how it is?

Well, I'm trying to get myself talked in to acquiring one! Tongue

If you do you may have to change your signature! Biggrin

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