06-12-2014, 08:03 AM
#1
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http://www.simplysogood.com/2013/03/arti...bread.html

It uses minimal equipment that most everyone already has; nor does it need special techniques, or even requires any cooking skills. It will be extremely difficult to make it "go wrong". But if it's a terrible loaf it isn't worth making. This is an excellent loaf.

The only downside is the time required, but it's incredibly flexible there as well. It's not work time, it just sits there developing flavor while you're off doing other things.

[Image: DSC04103_zps426462a8.jpg]
[Image: DSC04108_zps489d86b5.jpg]

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 06-12-2014, 09:34 AM
#2
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Brian, that looks so good. I am almost tempted to try it. However, I can ruin absolutely anything when it comes to cooking. Rolleyes

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 06-12-2014, 11:23 AM
#3
  • OldDog23
  • Senior Member
  • BeanTown MetroWest
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looks yummy, and a great link, bookmarked. thanks !

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 06-12-2014, 11:40 AM
#4
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That looks wonderful, and very easy. I already bake my own bread but this is really cool!

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 06-12-2014, 12:00 PM
#5
  • Howler
  • A calamophile and vintage razor lover
  • Fort Smith AR
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Great recipe, thanks for sharing.

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 06-12-2014, 12:48 PM
#6
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WOW, I had no idea it was that easy! I'll have to make this one night. The wife and kids will be blown away. "Don't worry honey, I'll make the bread" Biggrin

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 06-12-2014, 12:59 PM
#7
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Thanks for posting. Brian.

As long as I have had my Primo, I have not baked bread in it yet.
This will become my first attempt.

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 06-12-2014, 06:20 PM
#8
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(06-12-2014, 09:34 AM)freddy Wrote: Brian, that looks so good. I am almost tempted to try it. However, I can ruin absolutely anything when it comes to cooking. Rolleyes

Freddy, trust me on this (read the recipe too) anyone can make this loaf. Really. You can do it. You'll be amazed at how easy it is and the fantastic character of the loaf.

There are ways to screw it up, but one really needs to go far afield in order to get that to happen. One needs to really work at it. The last loaf I made I used flour that gives lots of problems and I knew it wasn't going to work as I mixed it. It wasn't like the loaf pictured in this thread, but it was edible. But I need to do more work if I expect it to work with 100% homeground whole wheat. I don't think I'll ever be successful with a no knead bread with that flour. So maybe one more try and if it's no better I'll probably call it quits.

But if you use "normal" store bought flour? You can absolutely do it. Just follow the directions. It's really easy.

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 06-12-2014, 06:31 PM
#9
  • freddy
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I did read her recipe, and enjoyed the light patter she used in describing how to put everything together. I actually went to the supermarket just to see if I could find the instant yeast (I knew I could get the flour and kosher salt). They carry it so maybe I'll pick up the ingredients tomorrow since I have to get some vegetables anyway.

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 06-12-2014, 08:15 PM
#10
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Brian, thanks for the link and good luck with the bread, Feddy! Biggrin

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 06-13-2014, 06:17 PM
#11
  • Sully
  • Super Moderator
  • Cedar Park, Texas
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That's a good looking loaf of bread, and the crumb is very nice.

Give it a try Freddy. The worst that can happen is it doesn't work and the odds are good that you'll end up with something delicious.

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 06-13-2014, 06:34 PM
#12
  • freddy
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  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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(06-13-2014, 06:17 PM)Sully Wrote: That's a good looking loaf of bread, and the crumb is very nice.

Give it a try Freddy. The worst that can happen is it doesn't work and the odds are good that you'll end up with something delicious.

Shawn, it is rising as I type this. I plan on attempting to bake it tomorrow morning sometime. I hope I don't ruin it.

Here's what's really strange. I filled my measuring cup with the 1½ cups of tap water required and put it aside. I then started putting together and mixing the dry ingredients. When I went to use water from the faucet again, nothing came out of the cold tap! Every other hot and cold tap in the apartment was fine, just not the one in the kitchen. Luckily, and for some unknown reason, I decided to fill that measuring cup before doing anything else so was able to finish making the dough. The plumber isn't coming until Monday afternoon. Rolleyes

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 06-13-2014, 10:08 PM
#13
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I have my fingers crossed for you Freddy! Good luck!

Be sure to preheat the oven and pot for the full 30 minutes. Everything must be up to temp' before the loaf goes in.

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 06-14-2014, 04:05 AM
#14
  • Sully
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  • Cedar Park, Texas
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How did the bread turn out Freddy? I find that homemade bread makes the best toast.

Good luck with the water in your kitchen.

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 06-14-2014, 08:44 AM
#15
  • freddy
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  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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(06-13-2014, 10:08 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I have my fingers crossed for you Freddy! Good luck!

Be sure to preheat the oven and pot for the full 30 minutes. Everything must be up to temp' before the loaf goes in.

(06-14-2014, 04:05 AM)Sully Wrote: How did the bread turn out Freddy? I find that homemade bread makes the best toast.

Good luck with the water in your kitchen.

Brian, I pre-heated the oven for a full ten minutes and am now heating the pot. I set the timer for thirty minutes to do that.

While I'm waiting for the pot to heat, I have the dough sitting on a piece of parchment paper and covered in plastic wrap. To be honest, the dough looks a bit flat, but maybe that is my imagination. Also, all I could find for the pot was an old Lodge five or six quart cast iron Dutch oven. I forgot I even had it and it weighs a ton! I'm not sure if it will work but the lady in the link you gave us did mention it even though she prefers an enamel coated one.

Shawn, if it comes out okay then there will be photos. If not then I'll pretend I never posted in this thread. Confused

I thought that maybe the water would magically start again but, no, it's decided to wait until Monday when the plumber gets here. (mumble, grumble) I'm just glad the faucet worked long enough for me to get the water needed for the recipe because having to run back and forth between the kitchen and bathroom would not have been fun.

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 06-14-2014, 09:02 AM
#16
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Freddy, that's precisely the sort of pot you want to use! That's the best there is and it's what I use. No oil or anything else or you'll have a kitchen full of smoke.

The first time I used a piece of fitted parchment paper under my loaf also. I haven't since that first loaf. If the dutch oven is hot the loaf simply can't stick. Remember to cover it, that's what will turn your flat loaf into a risen and crusty loaf. If you have a water sprayer that's safe to use on food (no herbicide or insecticide residue), give the loaf a few sprays before putting the lid in place. Yeah, I know the recipe doesn't say to do that.

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 06-14-2014, 09:13 AM
#17
  • freddy
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(06-14-2014, 09:02 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Freddy, that's precisely the sort of pot you want to use! That's the best there is and it's what I use. No oil or anything else or you'll have a kitchen full of smoke.

The first time I used a piece of fitted parchment paper under my loaf also. I haven't since that first loaf. If the dutch oven is hot the loaf simply can't stick. Remember to cover it, that what will turn your flat loaf into a risen and crusty loaf. If you have a water sprayer that's safe to use on food (no herbicide or insecticide residue), give the loaf a few sprays before putting the lid in place. Yeah, I know the recipe doesn't say to do that.

Thanks, Brian. I definitely did not use any oil in the pot. The water spray idea came too late as it's already in the oven. I did put a piece of parchment paper in but made it long enough so that I could lift the bread out of the pot. I hope that works out okay. The lid still went on snugly, even with the extended paper.

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 06-14-2014, 09:23 AM
#18
  • beartrap
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I was going to keep it a secret, I was sure it'll be another failed cooking experiment for me, but it turned out great! Sorry no pictures, it was consumed in minutes by my family like they haven't eaten in days Biggrin
I'll definitely be making another loaf. Thank you Brian!

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 06-14-2014, 09:27 AM
#19
  • v4257
  • Always chasing the perfect shave
  • Boston, USA
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Well done! I'm an avid bread baker and that loaf looks awesome - esp the crumb.

IMHO - there are 2 easy changes that can make this loaf even better without much effort:
1. Use a DE blade(!) to score the loaf right before baking. This is optional - but can lead to a more even crust.
2. Use a sourdough starter. You can get some from your local baker, http://carlsfriends.net/ or simply PM me and I will be happy to send you some. Sourdough bread isn't sour (you can make it sour if you like - separate topic); sourdough is simply a natural starter that can improve flavor significantly. All bread was sourdough before invention of dried industrial yeast and to quote bread expert Dr Ed Wood "10,000 years later, and there's no better way to raise bread!" Smile

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 06-14-2014, 09:31 AM
#20
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(thumbs up emoticon goes here) Steve, I've deliberately tried to screw it up. Seriously. I couldn't. It may not be the easiest dough to handle because of the floppy nature and the hot pot, but it's foolproof.

Freddy, parchment is fine. Because of the nature of the dough it will help prevent burnt skin and allows for easier removal. But where it really shines is in getting the loaf into the extremely hot pot. I still have a burnt forearm from my last loaf.

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