06-26-2014, 08:57 AM
#1
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Recalculating, Recalculating A6

Our old (3 yrs or so) Garmin is some junk. It does not have lifetime maps with it and is pretty outdated but wow, these same roads were here back then.

So this time I am getting lifetime Maps and Traffic, but wonder if I really need bluetooth functionality.
What does it do for me, what added features would I need or get use from Bluetooth?

Based on reviews, I think I will stay with Garmin, looking at the nüvi 2595LMT 5-Inch Portable.
I don't need anything fancy, just functional with accuracy and tells me to turn BEFORE I get to the intersection.

Anyone have other suggestions, or why I would need bluetooth?

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 06-26-2014, 11:48 AM
#2
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My Garmin is four years old - a eTrex Legend HCx - and keeping the maps up to date is reasonable easy and free, thanks to OpenStreetMaps and this website - if your GPS supports microSD cards

Mark out what maps you need (or select from the drop down box), save the map image file on the MicroSD, insert memory card into GPS, and enjoy.

At least for southern Norway, the OSM maps are more accurate then the Garmin offerings - particularly on the foot and bike paths.

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 06-26-2014, 01:16 PM
#3
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That is good to know, Hans. I am not sure it would help me right now though as my Garmin cant tell me to turn in time on a street that has been there for decades.

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 06-26-2014, 02:10 PM
#4
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Obviously you're not meant to go down that street then...

Seriously though, on my GPS the turn notice comes up at least 500 m or so before I need to turn, using the OSM maps. However, I'm unsure if the data for when to turn is stored in the map or in the firmware on the GPS... a quick google finds little of relevance.

If your GPS have a microSD slot and you have a spare card, it might be worth giving it a go. The process is fairly quick, and if it don't work at least you tried Smile

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 06-26-2014, 04:24 PM
#5
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Good point, and I do have a card in my camera I can probably use.

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 06-26-2014, 04:30 PM
#6
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I don't think Bluetooth is as necessary as a big memory card. The updates will fill up the built-in memory very quickly.

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 06-27-2014, 05:24 AM
#7
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While I also use a Garmin eTrex Legend HCx for hiking and riding my bike, we do have separate GPS units in our cars. The new ones all come with lifetime maps, I think.

I've also stuck with Garmin, and they seem to work well. Best of all, the 'recalculating' has been taken care of. It now recalculates silently in the background when you deviate from the route.

OSM is great (it's what I use on my eTrex), but I wouldn't recommend it if you're not comfortable reading online instructions for making it work. Smile

Oh! And Bluetooth is not necessary.

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 06-27-2014, 06:12 AM
#8
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(06-27-2014, 05:24 AM)yohannrjm Wrote: Best of all, the 'recalculating' has been taken care of. It now recalculates silently in the background when you deviate from the route.

Oh! And Bluetooth is not necessary.

Thanks for that info!

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 06-27-2014, 07:58 AM
#9
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Wow .... people still used dedicated GPS units in their cars, My last 2 phones (currently on a Samsung Galaxy S4) have served as my GPS. I just use Google maps as with Verizon I've only hit one dead spot on the highways (through a mountain in W. Virginia). I also own Co-Pilot (a paid Android Navigation app) and install that whenever I am planning a long distance trip just to be safe in case I do hit some vast rural wilderness where I have no data coverage.

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 06-27-2014, 08:53 AM
#10
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(06-27-2014, 07:58 AM)wingdo Wrote: Wow .... people still used dedicated GPS units in their cars, My last 2 phones (currently on a Samsung Galaxy S4) have served as my GPS. I just use Google maps as with Verizon I've only hit one dead spot on the highways (through a mountain in W. Virginia). I also own Co-Pilot (a paid Android Navigation app) and install that whenever I am planning a long distance trip just to be safe in case I do hit some vast rural wilderness where I have no data coverage.

+1

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 06-27-2014, 08:58 AM
#11
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(06-27-2014, 07:58 AM)wingdo Wrote: Wow .... people still used dedicated GPS units in their cars, My last 2 phones (currently on a Samsung Galaxy S4) have served as my GPS. I just use Google maps as with Verizon I've only hit one dead spot on the highways (through a mountain in W. Virginia). I also own Co-Pilot (a paid Android Navigation app) and install that whenever I am planning a long distance trip just to be safe in case I do hit some vast rural wilderness where I have no data coverage.

I hate having Google and my apps knowing where I am, so I tend to turn off my GPS on my phone. It does seem like a waste of the phone's capabilities, though.

Anyway, we have the car GPS, so we'll continue to use it.

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 06-27-2014, 09:05 AM
#12
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(06-27-2014, 08:58 AM)yohannrjm Wrote:
(06-27-2014, 07:58 AM)wingdo Wrote: Wow .... people still used dedicated GPS units in their cars, My last 2 phones (currently on a Samsung Galaxy S4) have served as my GPS. I just use Google maps as with Verizon I've only hit one dead spot on the highways (through a mountain in W. Virginia). I also own Co-Pilot (a paid Android Navigation app) and install that whenever I am planning a long distance trip just to be safe in case I do hit some vast rural wilderness where I have no data coverage.

I hate having Google and my apps knowing where I am, so I tend to turn off my GPS on my phone. It does seem like a waste of the phone's capabilities, though.

Anyway, we have the car GPS, so we'll continue to use it.

In car GPS makes sense. Bigger screen etc. That I don't disagree with, but using a handheld one how days???

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 06-27-2014, 09:15 AM
#13
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Doug -

I can't speak for Hans, but when I head out to hike (either offroad while hiking, or on the bike) on trails that are new to me, I want two things:

1) GPS I can trust. The eTrex has many hiking-specific tools that haven't yet been matched on phones. It also gets a more consistent GPS signal. Finally, I go out with spare batteries, so I'm set for quite a while with power in my navigation hardware.

2) A phone, for emergencies. I cannot risk having the phone die because I used it as a GPS. I have had to call for a 'rescue' on occasion.

Believe me, when you're 70+ miles away from home on a bike ride, you want to have a cellphone in case something goes wrong (run out of spare tubes, you bonk, etc.).

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 06-27-2014, 09:19 AM
#14
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The downsides of using your phone for navigation is that you've to download maps on the go for the most part (adding cost - some of us pay for data still) and the phone has to be on the whole time (eating battery).

So while I can see the utility of not having two devices, I'll stick to my GPS when on the move.

/edit: Also, what Yohann said. There are things my eTrex will do that my phone wont (and vice versa).

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 06-30-2014, 02:10 AM
#15
  • Gago
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  • Rio de Janeirto
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I understand that you need a helluva GPS to go off-roading,biking,hiking etc...but speaking for myself, i have a Nokia 825 for 3 years now, and it is BY FAR The Best GPS i had. And i had at least four others.
I drive only in The City,tough, i cant say how that goes once you leave the asphault...
Sent from my RM-825_lta_brazil_222 using Tapatalk

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