07-18-2014, 12:13 PM
#1
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We were up at our camp in VT last week.

My wife took a bunch of pics while I was fly fishing for perch and bluegills. One of them turned out really well.
[Image: na9JEYu.jpg]

It captures the beauty of VT. Add a fly rod and line and life is good.

Phil

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 07-18-2014, 01:52 PM
#2
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Actually, add a great book and a beach chair and life is muccccchhhhhh better. Laughing1

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 07-19-2014, 09:14 PM
#3
  • ojinsa
  • Senior Member
  • San Antonio
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Ah this takes me back. I spent 3 years in Vermont and actually worked in a fly shop my third year there. I fished many, many, many streams in the area and I love them all.

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 07-19-2014, 09:54 PM
#4
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Nice country!

Phil there is nothing like fly fishing! Many years ago the wife and I (girlfriend back then) would drive into NY state to camp, and I'd fish the Beaverkill, and Willowemoc rivers; classic dry fly water. We'd camp right on the Beaverkill. Great fun, and relaxing. Where I fished it was a throw back zone, and one could anything catch little trout and monsters in the moving water, and smallmouth bass in the deep pools. It was very interesting when the monster trout got excited and lost their better judgment during a Green Drake hatch!

There is no place finer than to be near running water IMO. A fly rod just makes it even nicer.

What would a fishing thread be without a "big one that got away" tale !? I swear this is true without even the slightest exaggeration. One night a few friends and I had been drinking a few adult beverages and I had some heavy spinning gear with me. So we decided to experiment with a prototype lure for night fishing; no hooks. We clippd a cyalume light to the line and wrapped it with lead wire to give it weight to make it sink. We started casting at the tail end of a pool, and latched on to "something". Maybe it was an immature Nessie, we never did find out what it was. It was taking line at a fantastic rate going downriver through the fast water, and I was holding the rod and running down the shore to try to prevent the reel from running out of line. It was a few hundred yards to the next pool where Nessie stopped and just "sat there". After gaining quite a bit of line I handed the rod to my brother. The rod had a pretty good bend in it but we couldn't gain any more line and Nessie wasn't taking any either. From the angle of the line going into the water Nessie wasn't very far off shore. We were shining lights into the water to try to figure out what had grabbed the lure and wouldn't let go. My bro' went in the water and was getting close to Nessie. Taking in line as he walked to it. Then the lure came arcing toward him. Whatever it was had simply let go (no hooks). No marks on the soft poly of the light stick. I figure it was a turtle, but we'll never know. Yeah, I know the big one that got away, but it never started out to be that, not with no hooks being on the lure. It was a very interesting 20-30 minutes.

Of course we caught trout also, but I have no stories anywhere near that interesting about the trout. The biggest I ever caught there was an 18" brown during a Green Drake hatch. Lots of fun in fast water and a 7 1/2' rod, I don't remember what weight line it cast.

If you ever want a market fisherman's method to clean perch in literally seconds, just let me know. It skins them, gets rid of the "y" bones and guts them all in one operation. Even small perch can be cleaned by this method. Yellow perch is a very nice eating fish. I've never used it on white perch.

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 07-20-2014, 03:36 AM
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(07-19-2014, 09:54 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: If you ever want a market fisherman's method to clean perch in literally seconds, just let me know. It skins them, gets rid of the "y" bones and guts them all in one operation. Even small perch can be cleaned by this method. Yellow perch is a very nice eating fish. I've never used it on white perch.

Great Nessie story.

Would love to have the cleaning method. You can PM me or post it for other fishermen to see.

Phil

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 07-20-2014, 04:12 AM
#6
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Thats the life

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 07-20-2014, 06:17 AM
#7
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(07-20-2014, 03:36 AM)PhilNH5 Wrote: Great Nessie story.

Would love to have the cleaning method. You can PM me or post it for other fishermen to see.

Phil

I can't show you but I can describe it in detail. It takes much longer to read than to actually do. Do it once and you'll own if for life and never clean a perch any other way.

Take the y'perch and hold it in your off hand with the dorsal fin up, in it's swimming attitude, head pointing away from you. Take your fish knife and cut just under the dorsal fin, releasing a strip of skin on both sides of the fin and cutting through the dorsal fin bones. The knife will need to be held in a horizontal attitude to do this. Make this cut all the way to the back of the head. Leave the knife in that place on the fish, rotate it 90°(edit: that's funny, I write temps so frequently that it wrote 90°F here! Instead of degrees) so that the blade is pointing to the spine. Cut down to the spine. Put the knife down. You're done with it. You only needed it to make that one cut. What you did ws to cut a strip of skin from the top of the fish, forming a corner of skin on each side of the fish. I'll refer back to those corners of skin in a few seconds.

Grasp the fish body in one hand, and the head in the other, snap the spine and start to pull the head to the anus underneath the fish. The corners of skin formed by the knife cut need to be started by hand, but just pull the skin at each corner away from the meat; it's easy to do, no tools needed other than forefinger and thumb. It will reach a point where just pulling the head will be possible and all the skin will be pulled as well. Again, holding the body of the fish and head, continue pulling the head to the anus. The skin will come off in one piece, along with the y bones and all the guts. What you're left with is the spine and the 2 pieces of meat on either side. With minimal practice this can be done in 30 seconds, an old time market fisherman could do it under 10 and I heard of them doing it in 5 seconds.

It's possible to clean even small perch by this method. After cooking the slabs of meat come right off of the remaining spine as pretty as you please. My wife doesn't like fish, but she loves perch cleaned this way. Oddly enough here in Maine yellow perch is considered a trash fish, but they are just as delicious here in Maine as anywhere else.

Let me know how you make out with that cleaning procedure. I wish I could show you, but I don't have a perch available. If you have questions I'm here.

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 07-21-2014, 04:57 AM
#8
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(07-20-2014, 06:17 AM)ShadowsDad Wrote:
(07-20-2014, 03:36 AM)PhilNH5 Wrote: Great Nessie story.

Would love to have the cleaning method. You can PM me or post it for other fishermen to see.

Phil

I can't show you but I can describe it in detail. It takes much longer to read than to actually do. Do it once and you'll own if for life and never clean a perch any other way.

Take the y'perch and hold it in your off hand with the dorsal fin up, in it's swimming attitude, head pointing away from you. Take your fish knife and cut just under the dorsal fin, releasing a strip of skin on both sides of the fin and cutting through the dorsal fin bones. The knife will need to be held in a horizontal attitude to do this. Make this cut all the way to the back of the head. Leave the knife in that place on the fish, rotate it 90°F so that the blade is pointing to the spine. Cut down to the spine. Put the knife down. You're done with it. You only needed it to make that one cut. What you did ws to cut a strip of skin from the top of the fish, forming a corner of skin on each side of the fish. I'll refer back to those corners of skin in a few seconds.

Grasp the fish body in one hand, and the head in the other, snap the spine and start to pull the head to the anus underneath the fish. The corners of skin formed by the knife cut need to be started by hand, but just pull the skin at each corner away from the meat; it's easy to do, no tools needed other than forefinger and thumb. It will reach a point where just pulling the head will be possible and all the skin will be pulled as well. Again, holding the body of the fish and head, continue pulling the head to the anus. The skin will come off in one piece, along with the y bones and all the guts. What you're left with is the spine and the 2 pieces of meat on either side. With minimal practice this can be done in 30 seconds, an old time market fisherman could do it under 10 and I heard of them doing it in 5 seconds.

It's possible to clean even small perch by this method. After cooking the slabs of meat come right off of the remaining spine as pretty as you please. My wife doesn't like fish, but she loves perch cleaned this way. Oddly enough here in Maine yellow perch is considered a trash fish, but they are just as delicious here in Maine as anywhere else.

Let me know how you make out with that cleaning procedure. I wish I could show you, but I don't have a perch available. If you have questions I'm here.

Thanks Brian. Hopefully I'll be able to give it a try soon.

Phil

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 07-21-2014, 08:06 AM
#9
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Beautiful picture. Before my balance became enough of an issue to keep me from fly fishing any more, I loved to catch and release big steelhead trout on the Olympic Peninsula here in Washington. Nothing fights quite so valiantly as a 15-20 pound steelhead.

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 07-21-2014, 08:10 AM
#10
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Beautiful Vermont and fishing. Thanks for sharing.

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 07-21-2014, 09:33 PM
#11
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Phil, what a beautifully serene photo! Looks like you have a fabulous time! Smile

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