07-22-2014, 12:05 PM
#1
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I have no idea how many folks have tasted a pickled egg. They can be bland but vinegary, or quite spicy. I find these to be quite good and the recipe features 2 of my favorite flavorings in the entire world, garlic and onion. Those flavors aren't overpowering though.

We use this recipe as a way to preserve excess hen fruit, but if we didn't have hens I'd still make them as a different and fast snack or I even eat them for a really fast breakfast.

Pickled Eggs

3 dozen large eggs
6 cups White Vinegar (see note below)
2 cups water
2 medium to large onions, coarse chopped
5 cloves garlic, coarse chopped

1 gallon jar

Optional:
1 Beet for color
4 Ripe Scotch Bonnet Peppers, coarse chopped
2 generously rounded TBL crushed red pepper

Add ½ of the liquid and all coarse chopped flavorings to jar. Hardboil eggs, then shell them and add the eggs to the jar. The eggs should all easily fit in the jar and be covered by liquid. If desired, a skinned, sliced beet can be added for color, the pickling juice should be much darker than the desired egg color when you remove the beet slices. If the beet is small enough removal of the beet may be unnecessary. Allow to sit at room temperature for 2-3 weeks for the pickle to fully absorb. Shelf life should be a few months, but they won’t last that long. We put ours in the refrigerator in the shop, but we have kept them out and they don't spoil, especially with the 5:1 ratio of pickle below. The 1/2 gallon I'm working on emptying always sits out on the countertop and I have yet to have any spoilage.

Add salt and pepper as desired when eaten, a good hot sauce is also good on them if the hot peppers aren’t added to the jar. I think they make the best egg salad.

Feel free to adjust the flavorings or add your own.

Note: I now use 5 parts vinegar to 1 part water. Nor do I chop anything. I quarter the onions leaving the root nub attached, and just crush the garlic. No need to even fight the skins of the cloves if they don't come free easily.

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 07-22-2014, 12:13 PM
#2
  • freddy
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  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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The trouble with recipes like this, Brian, is that they are simply too big for me. At most I wouldn't want to make any more than 4 eggs at once. This does look delicious, though.

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 07-22-2014, 12:30 PM
#3
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This looks like a good recipe. Cool Hand Luke would be proud.

[Image: oZGVIGA.jpg]

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 07-22-2014, 01:58 PM
#4
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(07-22-2014, 12:13 PM)freddy Wrote: The trouble with recipes like this, Brian, is that they are simply too big for me. At most I wouldn't want to make any more than 4 eggs at once. This does look delicious, though.

DSG, you need to post the recipe. Inquiring minds want to know. OK, that'd be me. Biggrin

Freddy, scale it down. You can use any ratio of vinegar:water; from the 3:1 of the recipe, or all the way up to straight vinegar. Everything else is negotiable. It is NOT chipped in stone. But don't forget that it will keep for a very long time. Especially at the higher vinegar rates. That's what it's designed to do; that is, not spoil at room temps. In the old days and for some of us rural folk even today, it's a way to store eggs during the months of plenty so that we have them in the coming months when the hens molt and stop laying. What I'm saying is if you make "too many" they will keep on the countertop. Use a large jar that you'll be discarding. As long as it has a lid it'll work, nor does the jar need to be full. If you only want to make 4 eggs (that'll only happen once, once you taste them) just keep the ratio of vinegar/water and add some onion and garlic. We use 62oz pickled jalapena jars; they work just fine. You'd use a smaller jar. FWIW, we just made 3 of those 62oz jars full of pickled eggs, over 5 dozen eggs. Again, the pickle is critical, the other items are negotiable. Freddy, if you can boil and peel an egg you can do this. Have I ever lied to you?

Pictured below is one of the 62 oz pickle jars we use. The jar next to it is a 21 oz olive jar and I think it would be big enough for 12 eggs. Of course it would need a lid, this jar I pulled out of recyclables. Again, the jar used doesn't need to be filled, only the eggs need to be covered with pickle.
[Image: DSC04128_zps3d4d2e01.jpg]

I eat them for breakfast, but it's not unusual for me to grab one out of the jar midday when I come in to tank up on water. Freddy, I bet you could easily make a dozen pickled eggs and eat them long before they spoiled a year or more later. 4 pickled eggs is at most 2 breakfasts; for me it would be one or 1 1/3 breakfasts. They are delicious and go down some easy.

------------------

OH, I nearly forgot I wanted to write it earlier. A tip regarding eggs and what you see printed on the egg carton... Most claim that they're "fresh eggs". If you can boil the eggs and easily peel them they are at least 3 weeks old as a minimum. We find that eggs 5 weeks old and held under refrigeration is what we want for boiling and peeling. A truly fresh egg will NOT peel worth a hoot. Too, I've seen on TV the "experts" claiming that an egg that floats is spoiled. Maybe, maybe not. But a 5 week old egg, perfectly good to eat, will almost float, some try to. It's because the egg has dehydrated a bit and pulled away from the shell that they peel easily. That drying out allows air to get inside. Too much air will allow it to float, but it might not be a "bad" egg. It could be spoiled, but probably not if it came out of a refrigerator. A spoiled egg will explode and smell like, well, a rotten egg. When I find the eggs in an old guinea hen nest they go into the garden for tilling under. They sound like mini grenades going off when they burst. A spoiled egg will smell horrible and put you off of eggs for awhile maybe. There will be absolutely no doubt that you got a "bad egg". Unless you live on a farm and collect questionable eggs it probably isn't spoiled.

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 07-22-2014, 02:10 PM
#5
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Thanks for the tip, Brian. I like eggs a lot but tend to eat them in spurts. I agree with your assessment about the "floating egg" mantra, as I have discovered through personal experience. I can buy a dozen eggs and throw out half of them, unused, six months later and other times go through the dozen in two to three weeks.

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 07-22-2014, 02:45 PM
#6
  • Crag
  • Senior Member
  • Menifee, Ca 92586
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freddy...Any variety of egg works, too. In Arkansas we would often use quail eggs. My Grandma has used Pheasant, too.. Sometimes we use larger eggs from our neighbors pea hen. We use the same pickling recipe as Brian, although we also add thyme and sage as additional flavorings from time to time.

My brother even made a batch from hard boiled ostrich eggs, but those shells were very hard to crack! My favorite egg is from Rhode Island Red Chickens.

Good Luck!

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 07-22-2014, 03:16 PM
#7
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Man those look good. I love me some eggs.

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