07-28-2014, 04:35 PM
#1
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So you have a black handle Gillette Super Speed, a puck of Williams and a Dorco blade. Not the best rig but your working on it. What you do have is a kick arse set of techniques. Does your technique triumph over a lame rig or does your rig dictate the superior shave?

P.S. The rig components above are only hypothetical. My black handle Gillette is actually a pretty good shaver.

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 07-28-2014, 04:57 PM
#2
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That's a tough question. You can have the best equipment and poor technique and get a terrible shave.
You can have sub par blades, a great prep and technique and still get a terrible shave.

However, with great technique, I think you can overcome a lot of adversity in SW/HW deficiency.

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 07-28-2014, 05:13 PM
#3
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I've seen your mug Aaron. No blade, razor, soap, or technique is going to help! Biggrin

Love ya mean it big guy!

In all seriousness I believe great technique would make a major difference no matter what your useing. Granted it might not be as good as it could be but it would be better than just starting out and this being your first wet shave.

I've used both that razor and blade combo. Never used that soap so I can speak from some experience.

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 07-28-2014, 05:30 PM
#4
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(07-28-2014, 05:13 PM)FreddieP318ti Wrote: I've seen your mug Aaron. No blade, razor, soap, or technique is going to help! Biggrin

Love ya mean it big guy!

In all seriousness I believe great technique would make a major difference no matter what your useing. Granted it might not be as good as it could be but it would be better than just starting out and this being your first wet shave.

I've used both that razor and blade combo. Never used that soap so I can speak from some experience.

So what you are saying is that both are important. Not necessarily one or the other. Would you care to elaborate?

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 07-28-2014, 06:08 PM
#5
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(07-28-2014, 05:30 PM)DoctorShaveGood Wrote:
(07-28-2014, 05:13 PM)FreddieP318ti Wrote: I've seen your mug Aaron. No blade, razor, soap, or technique is going to help! Biggrin

Love ya mean it big guy!

In all seriousness I believe great technique would make a major difference no matter what your useing. Granted it might not be as good as it could be but it would be better than just starting out and this being your first wet shave.

I've used both that razor and blade combo. Never used that soap so I can speak from some experience.

So what you are saying is that both are important. Not necessarily one or the other. Would you care to elaborate?

I believe they are. Someone who has been wet shaving for a while has more experience and could still get a far better shave with this set up than someone new. Then again someone new might find this their holy grail of shaving.

Having used that blade and razor combo I can safely say that it will get the job done but was not my cup of tea. I found the razor to be too mild and the blade not up to par to handle my steelwool stubble. Having experience I know how to handle the razor properly, get a decent shave and could probably work up a decent enough lather with what some would consider a sub par soap as opposed to someone whom has never swirrled a brush.

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 07-28-2014, 06:17 PM
#6
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So what you are saying is that you are some kind of ninja who can get it done no matter what the rig may be? You my friend, is what I am talking aboutWink

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 07-28-2014, 06:23 PM
#7
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(07-28-2014, 06:17 PM)DoctorShaveGood Wrote: So what you are saying is that you are some kind of ninja who can get it done no matter what the rig may be? You my friend, is what I am talking aboutWink

LOL I dont think I would go that far. So far my shavette technique has me cutting more flesh than stubble. Thats one rig that no matter what the soap or blade, I still need better technique!Sad

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 07-28-2014, 06:31 PM
#8
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Ah, so the step up to shavette or straight means more practice even though the soap, prep and blade are superior? You have made a great point and that's technique is king.

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 07-28-2014, 06:36 PM
#9
  • Bsohne
  • Member
  • NY TRISTATE AREA
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It is key ...


Bill

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 07-28-2014, 06:52 PM
#10
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I think it's probably like anything else, a combination of materials and skill. A violin virtuoso can compensate, up to a point, for the lack of quality of a mediocre instrument; and a beginning music student can only barely touch the potential of a Stradivarius. In order to have that perfectly beautiful music, one needs both a great instrument and top technique.

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 07-28-2014, 07:04 PM
#11
  • LORDBISHOP
  • Lover of the Wet Shaving way of Life
  • Westchester, NY
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Technique triumphs over a lot of shaving adversity.

I mean good technique in regards to handling of your razor, prepping your face/head and making the best quality lather given the products capability(along with correct use of other products).
Having these variables down pat allows one to change their shaving style/technique to achieve the best results with given products.

If poor/unrefined or tired/lazy technique is employed during ones shave, I'm convinced the "BEST" razor, brush, soap and a/s wont really help to improve ones shave if there isn't attention paid to all the variables involved in a daily shave, and the attention needed to take advantage of higher end products. Sure some soaps lather easier comparatively, some razors are hands down smoother and some brushes whip lather quicker...but again if one isn't sure what nice lather feels like, they may not achieve positive results...same for the razor, heavy hands can turn any razor aggressive therefor affecting the shave negatively...finally if one doesn't know how to adjust product to water ratios depending on a given brush and cream/soap combo, nice lather will only be produced by sheer luck IMO

P.S. I am convinced that some people are just not blessed with skin that takes to being shaved. Situations like extreme skin sensitivity along with thick beard hairs and thick growth in many different directions just do not help with an irritation free BBS shave...This is why I ask people to show me their shave on video, or for a friend - in person, if they are having trouble or claim to be unable to achieve the results they expect from their shave..Then I can see if there are needed adjustments in technique, or does someone just have a tough combo that they need to find a happy median with, in regards to their shave. OH yeah YMMVBiggrin

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 07-28-2014, 07:30 PM
#12
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If you have your technique down pat you can get a decent shave out of substandard gear... but if your technique is poor your shaves will be substandard no matter how good the gear is. Which is pretty much what everyone else have already said, just with different words.

The best is to have both good technique and good gear off course Wink

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 07-28-2014, 07:50 PM
#13
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Look at lathering. I can use the same brush and soap but get very different qualities of lather based on the technique I utilize. Proper technique is not necessarily king, but it does guarantee that you reach optimal potential out of whatever gear you have at your disposal.

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 07-28-2014, 08:00 PM
#14
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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I used the same two razors, a Fat Boy and a slim, and two soaps, either Mennen's shave cream or Old Spice soap or cream, for 50 years, long before internet or forums were available to learn technique. Whatever technique I learned was from learning what worked best from shaving day after day. A year or so after discovering the forums, I think that I tried nearly every DE razor availble, as well as about a hundred soaps, and I don't think my shaves were really that much better. I have discovered soaps with scents that I enjoy, and certainly soaps with better skin moisturizing properties, but the quality of the shave isn't that much better. I have had a wonderful time exploring the world of shaving and what is available, and am now exploring the world of straights. My point is that "everything is king." You work on one thing at a time, from preparation, to finding the right soap, the right razor, the right blade, etc., until you work out what works best for you. There isn't a "best" soap, cream, razor, or blade, or necessarily "best" technique, although many people will argue the point. There are many very experienced shavers on this forum, and each one has found what works for them, which is different from what works for other experienced shavers. You need to work on one thing long enough until you get it down, and you'll never know if you keep changing things. Let experience be the guide. Become very experienced with your Super Speed until you know it well, so that you'll be able to compare how it shaves compared to another that you try. Then do the same with blades, soaps, preparation, etc. For me, this has been the fun part of shaving. It's quite an adventure. A young man walked up to Hemingway and asked him how to be a famous writer. Hemingway responded by describing young artists sitting in cafés talking about art. He said that you don't become an artist by talking about it, but by painting, and painting, and painting. He told the young man to stand outside of the theatre and write descriptions of the people leaving the performance, over and over again. My advice would be to do the same with shaving. I'd also recommend a mentor, someone very experienced who could sit down with you and discuss what has worked for them and what has not, and who will give you suggestions for how you could improve and develop your own personal technique. I'm fortunate to have found someone experienced with straights in my area, who I'm meeting with next week to discuss shaving and to learn his honing techniques. Have fun, and the rest will come.

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 07-29-2014, 09:39 PM
#15
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I would call technique most of a good shave. There isn't really such a thing as a "Good Lather" in my optinion. If a person gets a good shave with lather that's a litle airy or wet, then so be it. Blades are just the same, everybody is different. I believe it all comes down to technique. It's about the only thing that is hard and fast rule in all of this.

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 07-31-2014, 06:53 AM
#16
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I think technique and gear are both limiting factors - as is your face itself.

If you have the easiest-to-use, mildest razor, no-brainer soap, butter-smooth blades, but don't know what you're doing, your shave can only be so good.

Similarly, if you have amazing technique, a poorly aligned razor, and a soap that lathers like SoftSoap hand cleanser, your technique can only do so much to salvage that situation.

If you have a beard like a steel wire brush, or skin like onion paper, that's also going to limit your experience and/or magnify anything that's a bit off.

All three factors have to work in harmony, IMO.

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 07-31-2014, 11:43 AM
#17
  • Stubbl E
  • Senior Member
  • Lake Tahoe, California
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Of course technique trumps all else. A good technique will deliver fine shaves from just about anything. But "technique" is typically used in a very generalized way, when it's really very particular and subjective - tuned for your own beard & skin. Angle & pressure, of course, but also prep, lather, razor, edge... they're all part of what makes "technique" good or bad for an individual.

Once you've got it then any sort of external "sub-par" classification is basically meaningless outside of considerations of luxury and consumer exclusivity.

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 07-31-2014, 05:03 PM
#18
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I'll have to agree with the above remarks, but add that "best" is somewhat subjective both in terms of equipment and technique. Said differently, what's best for me might (or might not) work for another. Certainly, some of what I'll call equipment can be rated objectively in terms of build quality (e.g., razors, brushes, mugs, etc.) Soaps and creams probably fall into that category as well. From there skin and beard types, as mentioned previously, come into play. (Also the amount of beard growth, lest we forget....)

At that point, I believe things start to get interesting because attaining a DFS, let alone a BBS, becomes a matter of combining the "right" components, techniques and attitudes to work with each individual's beard and skin condition at the time of the shave.

So long story short: is technique King? Yes...but, as others have mentioned, only to a point.Wink

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 07-31-2014, 07:59 PM
#19
  • Mouser
  • Senior Member
  • Forest City, Florida U.S.A.
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(07-28-2014, 07:30 PM)WegianWarrior Wrote: If you have your technique down pat you can get a decent shave out of substandard gear... but if your technique is poor your shaves will be substandard no matter how good the gear is. Which is pretty much what everyone else have already said, just with different words.

The best is to have both good technique and good gear off course Wink
+1.Give a good, low handicap/pro golfer a beat up bent up half set of old Northwestern forged clubs an he'd whoop the average golfer with a set of custom Pings.

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 08-04-2014, 11:55 AM
#20
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For me technique is what ensures that I have a comfortable shave everyday and quality equipment is what makes the process enjoyable. Technique trumps any amount of money you can plop down on amazing equipment (although that doesn't stop me from plopping Biggrin).

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