08-03-2014, 08:18 PM
#1
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A few weeks ago, I was cleaning out some old boxes and I ran across this old razor. I have no idea where I got it from but it was not so long ago that I would have taken one look at it and thrown it away.

Thanks to my shaving journey over the last year, I have come to look at certain things a bit differently. In this case, I saw a chance to tackle a razor restoration for the first time. I didn’t know anything about this maker so I did a bit of research first. I discovered that Atkinson Brothers manufactured knives, cutlery and razors on Nowbray Street in Sheffield starting in 1879. I don’t yet know how to date this particular razor nor do I know if this manufacturer had a good reputation or not.

This manufacturer used two trademarks, one was BRILLO and the other was IN MIND. It’s hard to read the worn text but it looks to match up with IN MIND. The hallmark above the text appears to be a polar bear. I originally thought it was an upside down dead bug. I have no idea how I managed to see that!

So here is my restoration progression so far.

I didn’t think to get a picture of the scales but they were broken apart with half of one side missing altogether. This is a picture of the razor as I found it, minus the scales.

[Image: eLSGAgK.jpg]

[Image: I1WKJjb.jpg]

I started with 120 grit paper and worked the rust out. It was pretty much surface rust with very little pitting. In fact, there is only one tiny spot that is barely visible. This picture is after the initial sanding.

[Image: RWYmMBt.jpg]

[Image: FESDhjQ.jpg]

I worked the grits up from 120, going to 220, 320, 400 and 600. I then honed the blade on a 3000 grit stone and was able to revive the edge pretty well. This picture is what it looks like right now. As you can see, I have totally screwed up the honing process. I should have just sent it out to someone who knows what they are doing.

[Image: tmJsIeD.jpg]

[Image: o6Ko2Fq.jpg]

There are still visible sanding marks on the blade although they are small. I don’t know if I need to re-work from a lower grit paper again or if I just need to find a higher grit paper to smooth it out more. I don’t yet know where to find paper higher than 600 but once I start looking on-line, I’m sure I’ll figure something out. I have also been looking for replacement scales but have not found any that I like just yet. That will be a whole new learning experience when I replace the scales.


Anyway, since this is my first complete restoration, I thought I would share this here. Any input or suggestions on any part of my project are welcome. Thanks.

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 08-03-2014, 09:01 PM
#2
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Actually a really nice first restore. Some higher grit and the Maas work and it will be a real looker. One thing you can do when honing is to put electrical tape on the spine. It will protect the spine from the honing stone.

I am too afraid to try something like that.

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 08-04-2014, 01:36 AM
#3
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You should have used tape on the spine what you have now done is alter the blade geometry by taking off more metal towards the front of the spine altering the angle of the bevel and the reason why the the leading edge of the blade as a small bevel, and towards the heel as a much larger bevel, if only all newcomers to restoration would heed the words of a few pro's always tape no matter what, besides being wrong it looks wrong a razor can cost many hundreds of dollars a piece of tape costs peanuts it really is false economy.

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 08-04-2014, 01:52 AM
#4
  • BobH
  • Senior Member
  • Thunder Bay Canada
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Not too shabby at all for a first shot at a restore.

A lot of razors have issues like warps/twists/uneven grinds that make honing difficult and require the use of different kinds of strokes when honing. That makes honing more difficult. Your razor may be one of those more difficult ones and hard to learn honing on.

When you do rescale the razor the pivot hole looks a bit big and if it is there will be some play in the blade once pinned. To avoid that you could sleeve the hole to the proper size before pinning.

Lots to learn but you are not off to a bad start.

Bob

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 08-05-2014, 03:05 AM
#5
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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I've often read about this taping of the blade but I've never seen it done. Perhaps one of you pros could show us a picture of a taped blade.

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 08-05-2014, 05:39 AM
#6
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Thank you all for the input. I had seen reference to tape some time ago but I didn't remember what it was referring to. Now that you mention this, it makes sense. I have a Whipped Dog sight unseen that works wonderfully but the spine is ground like mine only consistently along its length. I suppose I saw that as normal for a blade that needed a lot of work on it's edge so I honestly was not concerned.

What I was more worried about was the fact that the grind marks were not consistent along the spine but when you mention that this changes the geometry of the blade by making the angle different along the edge, I am wondering if it can be salvaged.

Jamie, thank you for your input and I take your gentle chiding as part of the learning process. Yours is very good information that I will apply to any future endeavors. My biggest frustration,. in retrospect, was not posting this project here sooner. I started this restoration before becoming a member here and when I posted at another forum, it seemed there was no interest from that community at all. Not one response even to this day. So, I read as much as I could on my own and just started. When I posted here, you guys responded quite quickly with apparent interest in helping. I only wish my first stop was here because by then, the damage was already done.

I am still not quite sure how I feel about this mistake. I had nothing invested in this razor when I started but now that I have put time and effort into it, I want to turn out the best first product I can. With that in mind, is there anything I can do to salvage this blade? Even if not, I will continue to use it for learning how to replace the scales.

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 08-05-2014, 07:13 AM
#7
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(08-05-2014, 05:39 AM)ButchersHook Wrote: Thank you all for the input. I had seen reference to tape some time ago but I didn't remember what it was referring to. Now that you mention this, it makes sense. I have a Whipped Dog sight unseen that works wonderfully but the spine is ground like mine only consistently along its length. I suppose I saw that as normal for a blade that needed a lot of work on it's edge so I honestly was not concerned.

What I was more worried about was the fact that the grind marks were not consistent along the spine but when you mention that this changes the geometry of the blade by making the angle different along the edge, I am wondering if it can be salvaged.

Jamie, thank you for your input and I take your gentle chiding as part of the learning process. Yours is very good information that I will apply to any future endeavors. My biggest frustration,. in retrospect, was not posting this project here sooner. I started this restoration before becoming a member here and when I posted at another forum, it seemed there was no interest from that community at all. Not one response even to this day. So, I read as much as I could on my own and just started. When I posted here, you guys responded quite quickly with apparent interest in helping. I only wish my first stop was here because by then, the damage was already done.

I am still not quite sure how I feel about this mistake. I had nothing invested in this razor when I started but now that I have put time and effort into it, I want to turn out the best first product I can. With that in mind, is there anything I can do to salvage this blade? Even if not, I will continue to use it for learning how to replace the scales.


I assure you it's not chiding and when you consider it's your first attempt then hats off to you, but I'm glad you choose that razor and not something that cost you a lot more money, but really It's worth investing in some quality Scotch 3M super 88 heavy duty tape in the future good start to your honing career.

Jamie.

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 08-05-2014, 10:52 AM
#8
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(08-05-2014, 03:05 AM)Johnny Wrote: I've often read about this taping of the blade but I've never seen it done. Perhaps one of you pros could show us a picture of a taped blade.

Here's a Google image. I tend to end it closer to the toe than in the pic. The idea is, the wear will take place on the tape and not the actual spine. Cheap chinese electrical tape is best. Comes off easy and is a bit thicker than regular.

[Image: IMG_0027.jpg]

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 08-05-2014, 11:23 AM
#9
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Thanks Doug.

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 08-05-2014, 03:33 PM
#10
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I might be speaking out of turn here, but you should also make notes as to what type of tape and how many layers were used when honing, as you'll want to replicate the same setup in the future.

Also I think that the pic shows a chip in the blade still? I could be wrong, but about 1/3 blade length from the heel?

Anyways. It's not a bad first go, and you'll learn loads from your mistakes, but little from your successes.

Cheers!

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 08-05-2014, 08:42 PM
#11
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(08-05-2014, 03:33 PM)RunWithScissors Wrote: I might be speaking out of turn here, but you should also make notes as to what type of tape and how many layers were used when honing, as you'll want to replicate the same setup in the future.

Also I think that the pic shows a chip in the blade still? I could be wrong, but about 1/3 blade length from the heel?

Anyways. It's not a bad first go, and you'll learn loads from your mistakes, but little from your successes.

Cheers!

Good point what tape and how many layers is another good point raised, I'm a bit of a stickler for very small even bevels, for my own razors which tend to be full hollows or half hollow one layer of tape is perfect, but as I hone quite a few razor weekly and they are a mixed bunch anything that's a quarter of closer to a wedge grind I always use two layers as one layer tends to produce not only a larger bevel on these razors which means you are taking off more metal than you really need to, and another point what tape you use is very important cheap tapes leave tape transfer on the hone I've found the best tape by far for not leaving transfer is Scotch 3M super 88.

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 08-05-2014, 08:43 PM
#12
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(08-05-2014, 08:42 PM)Jamie Mahoney Wrote:
(08-05-2014, 03:33 PM)RunWithScissors Wrote: I might be speaking out of turn here, but you should also make notes as to what type of tape and how many layers were used when honing, as you'll want to replicate the same setup in the future.

Also I think that the pic shows a chip in the blade still? I could be wrong, but about 1/3 blade length from the heel?

Anyways. It's not a bad first go, and you'll learn loads from your mistakes, but little from your successes.

Cheers!

Good point what tape and how many layers in another good point raised, I'm a bit of a stickler for very small even bevels, for my own razors which tend to be full hollows or half hollow one layer of tape is perfect, but as I hone quite a few razor weekly and they are a mixed bunch anything that's a quarter of closer to a wedge grind I always use two layers as one layer tends to produce not only a larger bevel on these razors which means you are taking off more metal than you really need to, and another point what tape you use is very important cheap tapes leave tape transfer on the hone I've found the best tape by far for not leaving transfer is Scotch 3M super 88.

I'll have to pick up some of the 88 and try it out.

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 08-08-2014, 12:50 PM
#13
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(08-05-2014, 03:33 PM)RunWithScissors Wrote: I might be speaking out of turn here, but you should also make notes as to what type of tape and how many layers were used when honing, as you'll want to replicate the same setup in the future.

Also I think that the pic shows a chip in the blade still? I could be wrong, but about 1/3 blade length from the heel?

Anyways. It's not a bad first go, and you'll learn loads from your mistakes, but little from your successes.

Cheers!

Yes, there is still a small chip there and there is still some work to do yet but I have been taking it very slow now that I know how easy it is to mess up the edge.

Thank you all for the taping information. I hadn't thought about how tape alone could alter the bevel so making notes on how many layers of tape, etc, is a very good idea that I intend to follow.

If I follow all of this great advice, I think I can get rid of that last tiny chip while restoring the edge to how it should be. Or, at least very close to it, anyway.

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 08-08-2014, 05:54 PM
#14
  • mbrando
  • Member
  • Bolingbrook, IL USA
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Hello,

When I'm working an edge to remove chips, I'll tape the spine to so all be the metal being removed comes from the shaving edge. To make quick work I use a 220 DMT, but I have to keep an eye on the tape and the DMT really eats up quick. I may change the tape 3-4 times by the time I have a chip removed or bevel set. Once the chip is gone and bevel set. I remove the tape then reset the bevel on 1k norton hone, since there is a slight difference with tape vs. without. Then I just work the blade up my progression and finish on a hard black surgical Arkansas.

- Mike

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 08-11-2014, 02:36 PM
#15
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(08-05-2014, 03:33 PM)RunWithScissors Wrote: I might be speaking out of turn here, but you should also make notes as to what type of tape and how many layers were used when honing, as you'll want to replicate the same setup in the future.

Also I think that the pic shows a chip in the blade still? I could be wrong, but about 1/3 blade length from the heel?

Anyways. It's not a bad first go, and you'll learn loads from your mistakes, but little from your successes.

Cheers!
That last comment is so true!

I've toyed with the idea of restoring a straight, but have held off since I know nothing about the finer points. (The devil being in the details and all thatSad) Saying that, my hat's off to you for attempting this project and putting yourself out the way you have. Bravo!Biggrin

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 08-11-2014, 04:16 PM
#16
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(08-08-2014, 05:54 PM)mbrando Wrote: Hello,

When I'm working an edge to remove chips, I'll tape the spine to so all be the metal being removed comes from the shaving edge. To make quick work I use a 220 DMT, but I have to keep an eye on the tape and the DMT really eats up quick. I may change the tape 3-4 times by the time I have a chip removed or bevel set. Once the chip is gone and bevel set. I remove the tape then reset the bevel on 1k norton hone, since there is a slight difference with tape vs. without. Then I just work the blade up my progression and finish on a hard black surgical Arkansas.

- Mike

Thank you for the response.

Could you please clarify something you said? The way I read your reply is that you take the tape off after the 220 and never put it back on as you go through the rest of the progression. I suspect that you were saying that after the 220, you only have to tape the spine once and it lasts through the rest of the progression.

The reason I ask is that I did that spine damage on a 3k stone so I am wondering if there is another technique that you use without tape.

I apologize if that sounds like a dumb question but I just want to make sure I am learning everything I can from everyone here.

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 08-11-2014, 05:58 PM
#17
  • mbrando
  • Member
  • Bolingbrook, IL USA
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(08-11-2014, 04:16 PM)ButchersHook Wrote:
(08-08-2014, 05:54 PM)mbrando Wrote: Hello,

When I'm working an edge to remove chips, I'll tape the spine to so all be the metal being removed comes from the shaving edge. To make quick work I use a 220 DMT, but I have to keep an eye on the tape and the DMT really eats up quick. I may change the tape 3-4 times by the time I have a chip removed or bevel set. Once the chip is gone and bevel set. I remove the tape then reset the bevel on 1k norton hone, since there is a slight difference with tape vs. without. Then I just work the blade up my progression and finish on a hard black surgical Arkansas.

- Mike

Thank you for the response.

Could you please clarify something you said? The way I read your reply is that you take the tape off after the 220 and never put it back on as you go through the rest of the progression. I suspect that you were saying that after the 220, you only have to tape the spine once and it lasts through the rest of the progression.

The reason I ask is that I did that spine damage on a 3k stone so I am wondering if there is another technique that you use without tape.

I apologize if that sounds like a dumb question but I just want to make sure I am learning everything I can from everyone here.

Hello,

Ah, no dumb questions here. Just questions. Wink

To clarify, Yes, for me, I only tape the spine while working to set a bevel or remove a chip on the 220. I'll keep changing the tape on the 220 as it wears through until I see that both sides have met.

At this both the geometry of the bevel to spine differs from a naked razor by about the thickness of the tape. I prefer my spine and bevel be on the same plain. Having the bevel and spine on the same plain allow the use of barbers hone without having to tape the spine.

Then I move to the 1K. No tape for me at this point. I work the blade on the 1K until the entire bevel has nice even frost. It will creep forward from the rear of the bevel forward since the spine was the thickness of the tape lower than the bevel.

Again, for me, I feel I get a sharper edge with no tape. I think it is easier to maintain and I think part that is because the spine is on the same plain as the bevel.

Now that it is all flattened. The two sides meet at the shaving edge. It'll cut hair and it is ready to move on up the progression from there. Getting the bevel set with the two side meeting to make the edge takes the longest. After that the other hones move quickly. You want to make sure you remove all the grit marks from the previous hone before moving on. After the edge is polished, you cannot see grit marks so you have to feel your way as it glides on the hone. For me a rule of thumb is about 20-40 laps to and fro. By 10 to 20 I start feel the blade give a glassy feedback. On my finishing hone it sticks like rubbing 2 sheets of glass together. Then strop and test shave.

Hope that helps. Smile

Just and FYI, my progression is 220, 1K, 4K, 8K, 12K, 15K, Surgical Black Hard Arkansas finisher. Strop linen then leather.
- Mike

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 08-12-2014, 08:45 AM
#18
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(08-11-2014, 05:58 PM)mbrando Wrote: Just and FYI, my progression is 220, 1K, 4K, 8K, 12K, 15K, Surgical Black Hard Arkansas finisher. Strop linen then leather.

Wow, that is some serious progression!

I tend to keep taped through the 8k, and remove tape for 12k. A lot of that depends on the spine. If the spine is a basic spine I will remove far sooner than if it has decorations, or is beveled or something special. If I ever get my technique down pat, than I may feel more comfortable removing the tape sooner.

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 08-12-2014, 08:53 AM
#19
  • mbrando
  • Member
  • Bolingbrook, IL USA
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(08-12-2014, 08:45 AM)wingdo Wrote:
(08-11-2014, 05:58 PM)mbrando Wrote: Just and FYI, my progression is 220, 1K, 4K, 8K, 12K, 15K, Surgical Black Hard Arkansas finisher. Strop linen then leather.

Wow, that is some serious progression!

I tend to keep taped through the 8k, and remove tape for 12k. A lot of that depends on the spine. If the spine is a basic spine I will remove far sooner than if it has decorations, or is beveled or something special. If I ever get my technique down pat, than I may feel more comfortable removing the tape sooner.

Hello,

Yes, it is. But like everyone says, "It works for me". And for me I get predictable results e.g. a keen smooth edge. Biggrin

- Mike

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 08-12-2014, 08:56 AM
#20
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(08-12-2014, 08:53 AM)mbrando Wrote:
(08-12-2014, 08:45 AM)wingdo Wrote:
(08-11-2014, 05:58 PM)mbrando Wrote: Just and FYI, my progression is 220, 1K, 4K, 8K, 12K, 15K, Surgical Black Hard Arkansas finisher. Strop linen then leather.

Wow, that is some serious progression!

I tend to keep taped through the 8k, and remove tape for 12k. A lot of that depends on the spine. If the spine is a basic spine I will remove far sooner than if it has decorations, or is beveled or something special. If I ever get my technique down pat, than I may feel more comfortable removing the tape sooner.

Hello,

Yes, it is. But like everyone says, "It works for me". And for me I get predictable results e.g. a keen smooth edge. Biggrin

- Mike

Your edge is one of the best I have ever used. I have ZERO complaints on that. I wish I could get an edge like that myself.

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