05-19-2012, 05:19 PM
#1
  • ben74
  • Senior Member
  • Perth, Australia
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Help! I have a broken bone!

I have an unused M&F 3 band super from Lee with bone handle. It's a beautiful brush. It's small (by my standards), but the bone provides a lovely weight to it.

But...
[attachment=2273]
It's split all of it's own accord. It wasn't dropped. I believe that due to our hot summers, expansion and contraction are responsible for the cracking.

The knot is still firm in place and the handle is not worsening and it's not really weakened in anyway.

I have a matching one in black horn that I love.

What's your suggestion to do with it?

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 05-19-2012, 05:28 PM
#2
  • slantman
  • Expert Shaver
  • Leesburg, Florida
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What a shame Ben. I am only guessing but I don't think the handle is repairable. This company in Vietnam has a good reputation for making horn handles. This is their website.

http://www.handicraft-vn.com/shop/

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 05-19-2012, 05:29 PM
#3
  • ben74
  • Senior Member
  • Perth, Australia
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Thanks Jerry. I could fill it with an epoxy I guess?

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 05-19-2012, 05:32 PM
#4
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My first thought would be epoxy as I've read of many people sealing a crack. However, none were as completely cracked as yours. My condolences & I hope a revival is in the future for that beauty.

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 05-19-2012, 05:40 PM
#5
  • ben74
  • Senior Member
  • Perth, Australia
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(05-19-2012, 05:32 PM)SharpSpine Wrote: My first thought would be epoxy as I've read of many people sealing a crack. However, none were as completely cracked as yours. My condolences & I hope a revival is in the future for that beauty.

I think the epoxy will work, There is no "play" in the crack, so apart from cosmetically I don't think the brush will be compromised in any way.

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 05-19-2012, 05:59 PM
#6
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(05-19-2012, 05:28 PM)slantman Wrote: What a shame Ben. I am only guessing but I don't think the handle is repairable. This company in Vietnam has a good reputation for making horn handles. This is their website.

http://www.handicraft-vn.com/shop/

Damn Jerry, he's got some nice grips there.

Thanks

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 05-19-2012, 09:10 PM
#7
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Epoxy and paint to match, look at it this way now it has character.

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 05-19-2012, 09:20 PM
#8
  • Johnny
  • Senior Member
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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If it's cracked, it has to have some give to it. How about a small bead of clear epoxy worked down in to the crack, then put two or three hose clamps on it to try and squeeze together. Wrapping it before you put the hose clamps on to protect it.

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 05-19-2012, 09:27 PM
#9
  • ben74
  • Senior Member
  • Perth, Australia
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(05-19-2012, 09:20 PM)Johnny Wrote: If it's cracked, it has to have some give to it. How about a small bead of clear epoxy worked down in to the crack, then put two or three hose clamps on it to try and squeeze together. Wrapping it before you put the hose clamps on to protect it.

Thanks for the advice Johnny.

I've squeezed with all my might with little or no effect on the gap formed by the crack. I'm surprised how sold it still feels, apart from the obvious penetrability of water now, the integrity of the brush seems to have remained intact!

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 05-19-2012, 09:31 PM
#10
  • Johnny
  • Senior Member
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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(05-19-2012, 09:27 PM)ben74 Wrote:
(05-19-2012, 09:20 PM)Johnny Wrote: If it's cracked, it has to have some give to it. How about a small bead of clear epoxy worked down in to the crack, then put two or three hose clamps on it to try and squeeze together. Wrapping it before you put the hose clamps on to protect it.

Thanks for the advice Johnny.

I've squeezed with all my might with little or no effect on the gap formed by the crack. I'm surprised how sold it still feels, apart from the obvious penetrability of water now, the integrity of the brush seems to have remained intact!

Well, I don't know if it's good advise, but it sounds logical to me. If it were mine that is what I would try. But who knows, squeezing with hose clamps could further fracture the bone. Take it to a bone surgon.Biggrin

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 05-20-2012, 11:36 PM
#11
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Hello Ben,

Your local piano shop might have good tools and material for that.
I checked some sites, and they all seem to be able to repair (fill, polish, glue) ivory piano keys (you may want to google that yourself, and see what comes up).

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 05-21-2012, 12:35 AM
#12
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That's a shame Ben.

If you want a new handle, contact Beejay and get yourself a custom handle to go with the knot.

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 05-21-2012, 02:06 AM
#13
  • ben74
  • Senior Member
  • Perth, Australia
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Thank-you gentlemen for all of the advice.

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 05-21-2012, 03:16 AM
#14
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(05-21-2012, 02:06 AM)ben74 Wrote: Thank-you gentlemen for all of the advice.

I second Wim's advice. They are the experts in this area.

Good fortune.

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 05-21-2012, 01:37 PM
#15
  • Brent
  • Active Member
  • Columbus, OH
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I have a question - great discussion on how to fix it. For future bone handled brush owners out there - is there anything preventative that can be done to minimize the risk of this happening?

I've heard that natural horn handled brushes should be treated with mineral oil from time to time. Would this also apply to bone?

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 05-21-2012, 03:05 PM
#16
  • ben74
  • Senior Member
  • Perth, Australia
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(05-21-2012, 01:37 PM)Brent Wrote: I have a question - great discussion on how to fix it. For future bone handled brush owners out there - is there anything preventative that can be done to minimize the risk of this happening?

I've heard that natural horn handled brushes should be treated with mineral oil from time to time. Would this also apply to bone?

Neatsfoot oil is recommended for conditioning horn. I'm sure it would work for bone too.

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 05-21-2012, 10:14 PM
#17
  • xraygun
  • Active Member
  • Bainbridge Island
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Sorry to see that happen Ben.

I think I'd use jeweler's epoxy in that crack. It's thin enough to get in there.
Cheers,
Ray

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 05-22-2012, 02:33 AM
#18
  • ben74
  • Senior Member
  • Perth, Australia
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(05-21-2012, 10:14 PM)xraygun Wrote: Sorry to see that happen Ben.

I think I'd use jeweler's epoxy in that crack. It's thin enough to get in there.
Cheers,
Ray

Thanks Ray, I think that is the way forward...

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 05-22-2012, 07:57 AM
#19
  • sp514
  • Member
  • Toronto, Canada
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Ouch, it hurts me to see such a lovely brush break

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 05-22-2012, 08:14 AM
#20
  • ben74
  • Senior Member
  • Perth, Australia
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(05-22-2012, 07:57 AM)sp514 Wrote: Ouch, it hurts me to see such a lovely brush break

Yes, it would have been easier to take, had I used it and dropped it!

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