06-22-2017, 05:02 PM
#21
User Info
La Pavoni Europiccola. Vintage preferred.

5 272
Reply
 06-26-2017, 05:40 PM
#22
User Info
I have had a Rancilio Silvia for about 20 years. I've had minor repairs done on it and replaced the steam wand, but it is a great,very durable machine that makes great espressos and cappuccinos. They taste wonderful after a great shave with Proraso soap and an Omega brush--the complete Italian experience.

0 89
Reply
 08-14-2017, 07:30 AM
#23
User Info
If steam in not required a VAM or Caravel by Arrarex is extremely easy to use, clean and maintain. These are simple yet brilliant engineered machines giving excellent results in the cup.

5 272
Reply
 10-01-2017, 04:00 PM
#24
User Info
I keep telling everyone to try the bialetti brikka.  It makes great espresso if you use italian style beans (medium roast), is small, inexpensive, and really easy to use.

0 173
Reply
 10-02-2017, 10:39 AM
#25
User Info
Bialetti Brikka is a moka pot, not an espresso maker - even if I love the coffee my moka pot makes. Cold dead hands would be involved before I give it up.

As far as I can tell the major differences are in the pressure used to force the water through the grounds. Real espresso should be brewed at at least 9 bar (130.53 psi / 900 kPa / 265.80 inHg), while the moka pot brews at a paltry 1.5 bar (21.76 psi / 150 Kpa / 44.30 inHg). Household espresso machines usually work around 20 bar (290.08 psi / 2000 kPa / 590.67 inHg). If you get your moka pot up to 20 bar, you'll have shrapnel flying around the kitchen.

Moka pots are awesome. So are proper espresso machines. Wish I had room in my kitchen for both.

3 4,678
Reply
 10-02-2017, 11:07 AM
#26
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
User Info
Hans do you mean something like this.
[Image: oPTDrx5.jpg][Image: MBiK3Ji.jpg]

70 1,098
Reply
 10-02-2017, 11:44 AM
#27
User Info
Great setup!

21 1,807
Reply
 10-02-2017, 11:55 AM
#28
User Info
Awesome setup... someone is serious about coffee Biggrin

3 4,678
Reply
 11-28-2017, 07:42 AM
#29
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
User Info
(10-02-2017, 10:39 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote: Bialetti Brikka is a moka pot, not an espresso maker - even if I love the coffee my moka pot makes. Cold dead hands would be involved before I give it up.

As far as I can tell the major differences are in the pressure used to force the water through the grounds. Real espresso should be brewed at at least 9 bar (130.53 psi / 900 kPa / 265.80 inHg), while the moka pot brews at a paltry 1.5 bar (21.76 psi / 150 Kpa / 44.30 inHg). Household espresso machines usually work around 20 bar (290.08 psi / 2000 kPa / 590.67 inHg). If you get your moka pot up to 20 bar, you'll have shrapnel flying around the kitchen.

Moka pots are awesome. So are proper espresso machines. Wish I had room in my kitchen for both.

Thanks for the follow explanation, Hans. I have a 16 oz Bialetti moka pot and it makes an excellent cup of coffee. The coffe I like best is...hold it...Starbucks Komodo Dragon. I grind the beans to almost espresso fineness and heat the pot over medium heat for my first cup of the day; there can be 1 or 2 cups later in the day. I like really like espresso too, but I have yet to find an affordable machine that makes a decent cup. For now I'm using my wife's Nespresso machine, which makes a tolerable espresso for after dinner.

7 934
Reply
 11-28-2017, 09:29 AM
#30
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
User Info
A good starter machine is the Silvia. She is an unforgiving taskmaster and allows for little operator error. However, if one can master Miss Silvia one is well on his way to mastering the art of espresso making.

70 1,098
Reply
 11-28-2017, 10:42 AM
#31
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
User Info
(10-02-2017, 11:07 AM)Barrylu Wrote: Hans do you mean something like this.
[Image: oPTDrx5.jpg][Image: MBiK3Ji.jpg]

I'm in awe.

7 934
Reply
 11-28-2017, 10:52 AM
#32
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
User Info
This is the machine in operation.

70 1,098
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)