08-25-2014, 03:27 AM
#1
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An interesting read, that made me think... I remember life before the internet well enough - if through rose-tinted glasses.

What it feels like to be the last generation to remember life before the internet

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 08-25-2014, 05:37 AM
#2
  • BobH
  • Senior Member
  • Thunder Bay Canada
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Yes, I remember life before the internet even to having a party line on the telephone. Yes, I find the technology today a little overwhelming in some aspects too.

Don't get me wrong, I do enjoy certain aspects of today's technology obviously as I am here now. You have to pick and choose what you want to do with it and when.

I just don't understand the need for constant unrelenting connection. I don't do face book or twitter and am amazed at the vast amount of inane chatter. Nothing like taking wonderful technology for communicating and wasting it on nonsense for the most part.

Bob

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 08-25-2014, 05:53 AM
#3
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(08-25-2014, 05:37 AM)BobH Wrote: ... Nothing like taking wonderful technology for communicating and wasting it on nonsense for the most part.

This image sums that last bit up wonderfully:
[Image: A_5iVsaCQAAAp_I.jpg]

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 08-25-2014, 06:22 AM
#4
  • BobH
  • Senior Member
  • Thunder Bay Canada
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(08-25-2014, 05:53 AM)WegianWarrior Wrote:
(08-25-2014, 05:37 AM)BobH Wrote: ... Nothing like taking wonderful technology for communicating and wasting it on nonsense for the most part.

This image sums that last bit up wonderfully:
[Image: A_5iVsaCQAAAp_I.jpg]

Laughing1Thumbup In a nutshell.

Bob

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 08-25-2014, 09:14 AM
#5
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Technology is a tool. We decide how to use the tool.

I've seen a lot of 80 yr old men driving Corvettes 15 mph below the posted speed limit on the highway. It is theirs to use as they choose but it certainly is not testing the car's limits. Thanks to marketing many people buy much more tool than they need (isn't capitalism a wonderful thing?). They choose how to use the tool.

The other issue is not recognizing what the tool in your hand is capable of. I know that use more resources on my smart phone than most but it still has untapped potential.

I too lived through party phone lines and dial up phones. Life was fine without modern technology and conveniences but is better with it.

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 08-25-2014, 09:15 AM
#6
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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(08-25-2014, 05:37 AM)BobH Wrote: Yes, I remember life before the internet even to having a party line on the telephone. Yes, I find the technology today a little overwhelming in some aspects too.

Don't get me wrong, I do enjoy certain aspects of today's technology obviously as I am here now. You have to pick and choose what you want to do with it and when.

I just don't understand the need for constant unrelenting connection. I don't do face book or twitter and am amazed at the vast amount of inane chatter. Nothing like taking wonderful technology for communicating and wasting it on nonsense for the most part.

Bob

I agree with Bob. The only reason I have a Facebook account is because the first shaving site I ever joined (and, sadly, long gone) was located on that site. The inanity I observe there boogles the mind.

While I certainly use and enjoy some of today's technology, some of my patterns will not change. (I was born in 1945 so my look at the world is definitely molded by just what the article points out.)

1) I still cannot enjoy a book if it is on any kind of e-reader, be it an iPad, Kindle, or the like. I need the physical book in my hand.

2) I still go to a store, purchase a birthday, anniversary, sympathy card, write a personal note in it, and send it via the postal service. When I receive an e-mail greeting card that says to me (rightly or wrongly) that the sender really doesn't care.

3) I enjoy an occasional video and they can be very helpful. However, I still need the written word, either on its own or in conjunction with that video.

4) I have a smartphone cellphone that I truly enjoy. However, I still shut it off at night so I don't get awakened by any number of sounds. If there is an emergency then I can be reached on my landline, and yes, I still have one of those.

5) Speaking of landlines, for longer calls, I always find it more comfortable to hold a landline rather than a cell phone and also to listen to a conversation through the former rather than the latter.

I am happy to have known both worlds and to have a place in my life for both pre and post 1985 ways of life.

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 08-25-2014, 10:06 AM
#7
  • BobH
  • Senior Member
  • Thunder Bay Canada
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(08-25-2014, 09:14 AM)Aimless1 Wrote: I too lived through party phone lines and dial up phones. Life was fine without modern technology and conveniences but is better with it.

Tell me that when you can't deposit or withdraw your money when the bank's computer goes TU. Seems they can't/won't do manual deposit withdrawal slips anymore. How about stores that have their CC machines go down and you don't have cash in your pocket.

In any event it is just a tool which brings a new set of problems with it. It solves some problems bit also creates others.

Bob

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 08-25-2014, 10:58 AM
#8
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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(08-25-2014, 10:06 AM)BobH Wrote:
(08-25-2014, 09:14 AM)Aimless1 Wrote: I too lived through party phone lines and dial up phones. Life was fine without modern technology and conveniences but is better with it.

Tell me that when you can't deposit or withdraw your money when the bank's computer goes TU. Seems they can't/won't do manual deposit withdrawal slips anymore. How about stores that have their CC machines go down and you don't have cash in your pocket.

In any event it is just a tool which brings a new set of problems with it. It solves some problems bit also creates others.

Bob

Bob, that's somewhat like when the pundits were stating that computers were going to make us a paperless society. Yeah, right. Rolleyes

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 08-25-2014, 11:01 AM
#9
  • Harvey
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  • North Hills CA
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When I was working and we went "paperless" we wore out at least 2 shreaders a year and bought paper in truckloads....all for medical records...what a scam.....

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 08-25-2014, 11:22 AM
#10
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"Whatever happened to the good old days when kids was scared to death of their parents?"

Archie Bunker

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 08-25-2014, 11:43 AM
#11
  • BobH
  • Senior Member
  • Thunder Bay Canada
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(08-25-2014, 10:58 AM)freddy Wrote:
(08-25-2014, 10:06 AM)BobH Wrote:
(08-25-2014, 09:14 AM)Aimless1 Wrote: I too lived through party phone lines and dial up phones. Life was fine without modern technology and conveniences but is better with it.

Tell me that when you can't deposit or withdraw your money when the bank's computer goes TU. Seems they can't/won't do manual deposit withdrawal slips anymore. How about stores that have their CC machines go down and you don't have cash in your pocket.

In any event it is just a tool which brings a new set of problems with it. It solves some problems bit also creates others.

Bob

Bob, that's somewhat like when the pundits were stating that computers were going to make us a paperless society. Yeah, right. Rolleyes

Where it has brought big changes is in the newspaper and book publishing fields. What news papers are left are a mere shell of their former selves. I worked in a pulp and paper mill for 34 years and the demand for news print has vastly diminished.

That means far fewer mills as capacity was shrunk and huge permanent lay offs of workers. The same is/was true off the newspapers at the same time.

We still use paper but far less than we used to.

The new technologies have also rapidly increased the rate of automation which in turn has lead to far fewer jobs being available to make a true living at. I distinctly remember a high school teacher telling us in the mid 1960s that we would be the generation to have the most leisure time of any generation. I don't think he meant that would be due to job losses and globalization which turned out to be the case. It is not all hearts and roses.

Bob

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 08-25-2014, 11:54 AM
#12
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Live by technology. Die by technology. I am a throw back in that I still carry and use cash. Too much risk in debit cards for me although no worries with credit cards. Chang brings both opportunity and consequence. Sorry for the effect on your industry Bob. I always recall that the inventors of the computer always claimed it would lead to shorter work weeks and more leisure time. Must have been naive as greed wasn't accounted for.

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 08-25-2014, 12:21 PM
#13
  • BobH
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  • Thunder Bay Canada
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(08-25-2014, 11:54 AM)Aimless1 Wrote: Live by technology. Die by technology. I am a throw back in that I still carry and use cash. Too much risk in debit cards for me although no worries with credit cards. Chang brings both opportunity and consequence. Sorry for the effect on your industry Bob. I always recall that the inventors of the computer always claimed it would lead to shorter work weeks and more leisure time. Must have been naive as greed wasn't accounted for.

Don't feel sorry for my industry, it happened in lots of others too. Got lucky and retired at 56.

I remember a time when you got paid to work, no interning/apprenticing for free. That is tantamount to slave labour IMHO.

Yea with all the technology today we work longer hours, take fewer and shorter holidays and are working for less money because of it. That is if you have not been forced to give concessions in wages to boot compounding the lowering of your standard of living.

Bob

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 08-25-2014, 12:29 PM
#14
  • Gago
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  • Rio de Janeirto
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As a 28 year-old, i don't recall life without internet. Even if here in Brazil, the internet took longer to be accessible to all, i was still a kid when my sister bought a PC with a 56k Moden and a AOL CD with Netscape on it =D

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 08-25-2014, 12:30 PM
#15
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Some things have gone backwards. Cars are an example. I think the older cars from the 50's, 60's and early 70's were the best ever made. We owned a 1973 Oldsmobile Delta 88 when I was a kid. Not a classic by any means, but it drove great, had more than enough room and had the best air conditioner known to mankind...certainly a must in South Texas. That stupid car never broke down and it drove like a boat. For some reason the whole family fought over it to drive. Tongue Oh, and it didn't have talking GPS, but we still got there.

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 08-25-2014, 12:33 PM
#16
  • freddy
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  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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(08-25-2014, 12:30 PM)DoctorShaveGood Wrote: Some things have gone backwards. Cars are an example. I think the older cars from the 50's, 60's and early 70's were the best ever made. We owned a 1973 Oldsmobile Delta 88 when I was a kid. Not a classic by any means, but it drove great, had more than enough room and had the best air conditioner known to mankind...certainly a must in South Texas. That stupid car never broke down and it drove like a boat. For some reason the whole family fought over it to drive. Tongue Oh, and it didn't have talking GPS, but we still got there.

I have to disagree with you on this, Aaron. Until the "Japanese invasion" took hold, most cars were lemons. To this day I will not buy a car designed or sold by GM, Ford, or Chrysler. While this is my opinion, foreign autos would not have gotten the toehold they did if American autos were well built.

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 08-25-2014, 12:51 PM
#17
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Does this mean I am really that old?! Biggrin

I guess I should finally get a cell-phone of some type, soon, to catch up to the digital age! Biggrin

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 08-31-2014, 12:47 PM
#18
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Incredible how many folks who responded that I can identify with.

> I remember party lines. But I remember CompuServe also, BBSes, and transfer protocols such as xmodem and such. I also remember getting a USRobotics 19.2bps modem and knew I had the cutting edge. It was connected to an IBM PS2 model 30 that I souped up and it had paged memory, 2 30mb hard drives (huge). For it's day it was pretty decent. I also ran the MS/IBM proto version of Windows before the had their hissy fit. Can't remember what it was called. I used that keyboard until just recently. I loved that keyboard.
> Yes, we still have a land line, but we have cell phones also. I have no interest in ever having a dumb phone.
> I love the internet, but have no use for Facebook, twitter or any of the social media that appears to me to be only designed to waste the time of folks with no true self image. Made in Maine has stopped trying to convince me to get a facebook page or whatever it's called. I do have an acc't I think, but if so it's blank.
> I wouldn't want to lose the 'net, life would be far less rich. But I use aspects of it at my choice. I don't succumb to pressure to use any part of it.
> I remember when children used the phone to speak. I refuse to text. That's just a BS way to "converse". Heck, anyone can be texting on the other end. If they don't want to speak, that's OK, it means we don't converse. It's their loss, not mine. Whatever we were going to do we'll tell them about if we ever see them. Or I could text them to let them know what they missed.
> I hate online banking, but it's a necessity. My personal bank is OK, Paypal is the pits. Now they turned all acct's into dumb phone acc'ts. I have a good monitor, but it could just as easily be CGA as far as the interface is concerned. Paypal (today) is the pits. Not long ago it was OK. Just OK. If another viable option opens up, I'll leave Paypal in a heartbeat.
> I carry cash. Or my wife does. I back her up.
> I can't understand folks who are always connected. Do they really think they are that important? Will the world come to an end if they disconnect? Is the phone call that important that it needs to be taken while you're driving in traffic or at high speeds in traffic? Really!?

It's a convenience, a way for a richer life, but one needs to be selective. There's a time for it and a time to just let it be.

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 08-31-2014, 01:20 PM
#19
  • Karlo
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  • Manila, PHL
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Back then, you set a meeting and everyone came on time. Usually the only timepiece they had was what they wore on their wrist.

Now you have clocks built into phones, cars, tablets, etc... and 8 out of 10 meetings wont start on time because guys are late.

There were no mobile phones or Internet messaging apps. You called a fella to set a meeting. You called a bunch of fellas if you had to organize a study group. Usually, you just called once and everybody made it happen. On time, as agreed.

Our tools have allowed us to do more in a shorter time compared to the 70s and 80s but I think it's the users that have gotten a bit soft.

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