08-25-2014, 05:15 PM
#1
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I have been having problems using my soap sticks lately. I think I figured out why. I first was successful with shave sticks using my Plisson Cade brush. I was so excited about my success with face lathering with shave sticks that I decided to buy a brush that had a good reputation for face lathering. So I ordered a Semogue 610 boar brush. It seemed to be well liked for face lathering. That is when things went sour. I tried the 610 about 5 times and I never had enough lather for a second pass. I'm sure this is a great brush for face lathering but I guess for me I just can't seem to make it work. I went back to my Plisson last night and things got much better again.
I guess for face lathering I have to stick with synthetic brushes. I give up on my Semogue 610.

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 08-25-2014, 05:38 PM
#2
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I felt the same way after my first couple of outings with my 620. I changed my mind after using it with the La Toja stick in particular. A little more product, a little more time working on the face, and rotating the brush a bit all helped. I love the 620.

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 08-25-2014, 06:14 PM
#3
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Just use more product; I would load double the time with the 610 and spend more time working the lather on your face and ending with quite a bit of paint-brush strokes. You may also want to give it some time to break in.
Good luck.

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 08-25-2014, 06:28 PM
#4
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I tried putting as much product as I could but the second pass has very weak lather. I had high hopes for the 610 after what I have read on these forums.

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 08-25-2014, 06:29 PM
#5
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How long did you load the brush for and how many uses has it had? Also, what soap/cream are you using?

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 08-25-2014, 07:12 PM
#6
  • CRAusmus
  • Senior Member
  • Going from Texas to Georgia
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Is is possible that you have too much water? If you are comparing it to your synthetic your 610 is retaining a lot more water than the synthetic is. I have to really give my boars a nice hard shake.

I know that Badgers are supposed to be better at water retention, but I find that the bristles in my 610 and other boars really absorb a lot of water. You don't get that with you synthetic. I'd try lathering with a drier brush if if where me, and dip the tips if you need more water.

To me, that really was the hardest thing to figure out about brushes. Learning how each brush handled the water. It can be quite challenging in the beginning, at least for me anyway. Of course I don't know how long you've been using a brush either.

Just a suggestion. Gonna take some work to get it dialed in.

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 08-25-2014, 07:42 PM
#7
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(08-25-2014, 06:29 PM)celestino Wrote: How long did you load the brush for and how many uses has it had? Also, what soap/cream are you using?

I'm using shaving sticks.

(08-25-2014, 07:12 PM)CRAusmus Wrote: Is is possible that you have too much water? If you are comparing it to your synthetic your 610 is retaining a lot more water than the synthetic is. I have to really give my boars a nice hard shake.

I know that Badgers are supposed to be better at water retention, but I find that the bristles in my 610 and other boars really absorb a lot of water. You don't get that with you synthetic. I'd try lathering with a drier brush if if where me, and dip the tips if you need more water.

To me, that really was the hardest thing to figure out about brushes. Learning how each brush handled the water. It can be quite challenging in the beginning, at least for me anyway. Of course I don't know how long you've been using a brush either.

Just a suggestion. Gonna take some work to get it dialed in.

I thought that might be the problem that I was dipping the brush too deep into water. I tried dipping less without success. Maybe as you said I'm starting with the brush too wet.

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 08-26-2014, 09:49 AM
#8
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If you are using shave-sticks, how much of the soap are you rubbing on your face? It seems you might be leaving too much water in your 610 and not rubbing enough soap on your face, by the sounds of it.
Try using more soap and less water, then you can add water, little by little.
Another factor to consider might be that you may have 'hard water' which might be complicating things.
Good luck.

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 08-26-2014, 10:16 AM
#9
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I don't think I have hard water because I don't seem to have a real problem with other soaps. I may try to give the brush a squeeze before I start to lather. I can't see why so many people like this brush.

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 08-28-2014, 03:42 AM
#10
  • ben74
  • Senior Member
  • Perth, Australia
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The problem is that the Plisson synthetic so good. It doesn't require much product, hardly any water and no time to produce lather. The boar will require a little more of each I suspect...

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 08-28-2014, 04:09 AM
#11
  • Arcadies
  • Senior Member
  • Greeneville, TN
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The biggest issue will be break in..a Semogue boar will require at least a month of daily use to start breaking in. Until then, it will require a minimum of 5-10 minutes soak time (this will lower to about 3 minutes after break in) and quite a bit more product. Also, synthetics are going to make any boar look bad, they create much creamier lather with half the product. The main reason for using a boar/badger, compared to synthetics, is the feel on the face.

I'd give the boar at least a month to come into it's own, but even when it does, don't expect it to create mountains of yogurty lather similar to your synth.

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 08-28-2014, 04:42 AM
#12
  • Deuce
  • Just a guy
  • Cave Creek
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Very good advice. Since getting a Plisson synth, it makes face lathering so much easier.

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 08-28-2014, 06:02 AM
#13
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by the time it breaks in, add a small amount of cream on top of soap while facelathering.

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 08-28-2014, 10:42 AM
#14
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(08-25-2014, 05:38 PM)Rory1262 Wrote: I felt the same way after my first couple of outings with my 620.

Same with me as some other shavers too in forums
Semogue has quality bristles,they are different from other brands but need some special treatment.
Maybe the full break-in and a lot of time soaking will be the solution.

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 08-29-2014, 08:35 PM
#15
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A number of folks have asked how many uses you have with the brush. I waited to see that answered, maybe I missed it. That is critical because for a boar brush to reach it's stride it needs to break in. That can take anywhere from 20-30 uses. It can be sped up by hand lathering as often as possible with it after it has dried.

So I ask, has it been broken in? You'll know it's been broken in by the split ends on the bristles. It will also be quite soft when wet when that happens.

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 08-31-2014, 06:59 AM
#16
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It does need a break in period. A few wetting and drying cycles may be in order. Let it dry for 48hrs between uses. Also I found that creams worked well for me when trying to break in a boar because they are easy to lather. Also, I just soaked the very tips of the brush so it softened up but still had backbone.


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