08-26-2014, 12:59 PM
#1
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I'm active duty myself, I usually shave around 2000hours, so I give my face a break before PT (Physical training) also to save time I wake up 0500 if I to shave in the morning I'll need to wake-up like 0430! anyway back to my point, I start with prepping my face with hot water or shower, lather real nice thick lather with some of my kid's lotion for extra hydration and slickness after the shave I use AS Bayrum or Menthol yet the next morning and while running once I start sweating my face is on fire!
I use R41 2013, Shavette or SR, Luv close shave so shave with less aggressive is not an option, last thing I need is 5 o'clock shadow by noon. so active duty or daily shavers with sports activity how do u do it?!

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 08-27-2014, 08:51 AM
#2
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I've experienced that a few times after a particularly aggressive shave. Seeing how you shave at night maybe give a balm a try. The new Proraso Green Balm (available at IB) is incredibly calming and very affordable.

Another thing to try might be alum. My face seems to respond well to it, especially several hours later.

Lastly, check out a daily face lotion that has some SPF in it. Nivea, Loreal and Neutrogena all make one that's pretty cheap and available everywhere. I sometimes find that sweat plus a touch of sunburn makes for a nice sting!

Long list I know, hopefully one of them works for you.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 08-28-2014, 04:30 AM
#3
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I applied some burt bee lotion b4 bed, had a sweet ruck march today, burn free

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 08-28-2014, 04:44 AM
#4
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I get up at 0500 in order to have to time to have my coffee, do half an hour on the thread mill, shave/shower, eat and be at work (I'm flying a desk these days) at 0730. It works for me, and has worked for years* - since before I started with a DE in fact.

The days I know I have to get sweaty at work I try to avoid alcohol based aftershaves - not sure if it helps, but it certainly don't hurt.

*) How long, you ask? Well... it's 21½ years since I joined up Biggrin

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 08-28-2014, 08:22 AM
#5
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The control a straight razor offers over the shave cannot be beat.

On to my question for you fellows. First, thanks for your service. Second, someone told me that DE's & straight razors are easier to use in the field. If true, why is that? I would imagine that a cartridge (being fool proof) would be easier to lug around. Not to mention a straight razor would require more maintenance.

And I don't see how using a brush & soap would be more convenient, but the fellow only mentioned razors.

That said, I don't see a DE as being worse, but I can't see it being easier to use. Please help shed some light on this for me.

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 08-28-2014, 08:38 AM
#6
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Lee, I can't say anything about straights (even if I keep wondering about getting a shavette), but in my experience a DE, brush and shave stick is as easy as a cart and canned goo - with the added benefit of keeping more blades in the same space, as well as not running out of goo. Don't take any longer to shave either, if you gotten your technique down pat.

Also; when I was on my one year tour in South Sudan, I could actually buy DE blades but carts were hard to come by (and when they could be found, they were clearly knock-offs).

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 08-28-2014, 11:21 AM
#7
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Lee, during my last tour to Afghanistan I used my gillette cartridge, that was b4 I was reborn wetshaver Smile, but now I think about it I don't think it will be easier. ... during mu last tours many times I was rudely interrupted by a rocket and had to run to a bunker... I don't want to do that while a razor on my throat. .. beside if it was dropped and damaged I won't be too happy

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 08-28-2014, 01:36 PM
#8
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Ex military here, I can't see how a straight would be easier or desirable in the field. A DE or SE yes. My travel tech takes up no space, weighs nothing, and with 2 shims gives a passable shave. I can carry enough blades in the kit to last a very long time. Having written that, I'd still take a SE travel razor. That with a stick or tube of soap and a Simpsons WeeScot or tiny synthetic brush with a hole drilled in the handle and worn around the neck (so as to dry from body heat) would work fine. The only problem that I can see ... no steel pot. Can't use the Kevlar brain bucket to shave out of. What does one do for a "sink" today?

Sarge, I can't help with the original posted problem. I've been out for over 40 years and I used cartridges back then.

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 08-28-2014, 04:05 PM
#9
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I did not think about pack space (it's been too long since I backpacked) or resupply. I can see how that would be a plus.

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 08-28-2014, 07:21 PM
#10
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(08-28-2014, 04:05 PM)asharperrazor Wrote: I did not think about pack space (it's been too long since I backpacked) or resupply.

Lucky you Smile - when I'm on the Go (mostly for exercises, thankfully), it's a matter of grabbing the bags and be self supplied for up to three days... if it ain't in the pack, I won't have it.

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 08-29-2014, 02:36 AM
#11
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(08-28-2014, 01:36 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Ex military here, I can't see how a straight would be easier or desirable in the field. A DE or SE yes. My travel tech takes up no space, weighs nothing, and with 2 shims gives a passable shave. I can carry enough blades in the kit to last a very long time. Having written that, I'd still take a SE travel razor. That with a stick or tube of soap and a Simpsons WeeScot or tiny synthetic brush with a hole drilled in the handle and worn around the neck (so as to dry from body heat) would work fine. The only problem that I can see ... no steel pot. Can't use the Kevlar brain bucket to shave out of. What does one do for a "sink" today?

Sarge, I can't help with the original posted problem. I've been out for over 40 years and I used cartridges back then.
We get a steel cup with wire handle
[Image: 5e133ae70a47183e14b0db2af3626d5f.jpg]

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 08-29-2014, 10:22 AM
#12
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(08-28-2014, 04:05 PM)asharperrazor Wrote: I did not think about pack space (it's been too long since I backpacked) or resupply. I can see how that would be a plus.

Yeah, when we jumped we had over 100# strapped to us. Every ounce or cubic inch had to count. If we had ever jumped in combat that weight would have gone up by another 50-75# or more near as I can figure with the combat loads of ammo and food we all would have had. Some would have had more with a separate (huge) bag that would have been released after their main 'chute opened (WECE [?] bag? It's been a long time).

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