09-04-2014, 11:34 PM
#1
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I have been enjoying and act of wet-shaving for about 2 years now and have been generally using only creams. I have been a lurker for almost the past year on this site, just acquiring information and doing my own research, however, I'm really trying to understand the differences between them; besides the obvious.

Honestly, I'm tired of the lack of "slick" I get with the few creams that I use daily. I'm about to start building a collection of things, but I want to truly know if soap if better.

Any solid info will do. Looking forward to getting an understanding and help on all of this.

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 09-05-2014, 11:46 AM
#2
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My research into the subject suggests three major differences:

1. Soaps will have a higher percentage of sodium salt compared to potassium. Softer soaps may still have more K-based than Na-based.

2. Creams have a slightly different set of common oils (or fatty acids) that are used to make the soaps. In particular, I rarely see Mrystic Acid based soap listed on shaving soaps, but they're frequently in creams.

3. Creams generally have additional liquid and unsaponified oils added to the soap mass after the inital cook is over, to contribute to the creamy consistency and keep it loose.

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 09-05-2014, 02:39 PM
#3
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I started with creams and croaps, then last year began using soaps also.

I find that I get the best lather and shaving performance when I mix a soap and a cream.

Can I get fantastic shaves from just using creams and soaps, yes.
But I feel I get a better performance from the superlather you get from mixing the two.

Creams are often better at lathering fast and for moisturizing the face.

Soaps are often better at creating a slick lather and not so much else to be honest. Soaps also tend to dry my face out more, than creams do.

So I find when I mix them together, I get slickness from the soap and all the rest from the cream Smile

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 09-05-2014, 07:27 PM
#4
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I also prefer soaps, specifically, the artisanal ones.
I propose you try some soaps to compare to your creams and see what works better for you as first-hand experience is the best information.
Good luck.

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 09-05-2014, 10:20 PM
#5
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Good information gentleman. So, what's some good soaps to maybe first try out?

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 09-06-2014, 12:15 PM
#6
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(09-05-2014, 10:20 PM)C-NoEviL Wrote: Good information gentleman. So, what's some good soaps to maybe first try out?

1. Tabac
2. Martin de Candre
3. DR Harris
4. Czech & Speak
5. Klar Seifen

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 09-06-2014, 01:29 PM
#7
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Mike's
Queen Charlotte's
Tabac
Stirling

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 09-06-2014, 01:43 PM
#8
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The two suggestions above are very good soaps to try.
I would also suggest these:

* Mystic Water
* Cold River
* Jabonman
* Catie's Bubbles
* HTGAM


Good luck.

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 09-08-2014, 12:45 PM
#9
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Lot of options here. I'll have to get some samples, or take a drive up north one weekend to find a few of these.

I've heard a lot about Tabac and Mystic Water. I'm leaning towards one of those.

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 09-08-2014, 04:22 PM
#10
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I also started with creams and have moved to soaps. The only cream that I now own and use on occasion is Proraso. Not only do I like soaps better, it feels like I'm cheating when making lather with cream since its so easy.Wink

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 09-08-2014, 08:13 PM
#11
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D.R. Harris, Mitchell's Wool Fat. I started out wetshaving with soaps, since what helped draw me in to wetshaving was the fascination of creating a shaving "cream" out of a bar of soap with a brush. I've used creams over the years but have mainly used soaps as I find they give me better shaves.

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 09-09-2014, 02:27 AM
#12
  • joedy
  • Member
  • Shenandoah Valley, Virginia
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If you're just starting into soaps, be sure to initially chose the ones that get good marks for the ease of lathering.

Tabac should have a byline that says, "So easy, even a caveman can lather it." If you find that you love the scent (like I do) then you've found a win-win first soap.

Some of the more challenging hard soaps like Trumper's may discourage you initially since they require more work and may produce substandard lathers when you're relearning the techniques.

Another thought is to pick a hard soap and cream combo of the same scent and same brand label that you enjoy. This way, you can start lathering with the soap and use the cream as a back up if your lather isn't adequate.

-joedy

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 09-09-2014, 07:15 AM
#13
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(09-08-2014, 08:13 PM)ShaveWares Wrote: D.R. Harris, Mitchell's Wool Fat. I started out wetshaving with soaps, since what helped draw me in to wetshaving was the fascination of creating a shaving "cream" out of a bar of soap with a brush. I've used creams over the years but have mainly used soaps as I find they give me better shaves.

(09-09-2014, 02:27 AM)joedy Wrote: If you're just starting into soaps, be sure to initially chose the ones that get good marks for the ease of lathering.

Tabac should have a byline that says, "So easy, even a caveman can lather it." If you find that you love the scent (like I do) then you've found a win-win first soap.

Some of the more challenging hard soaps like Trumper's may discourage you initially since they require more work and may produce substandard lathers when you're relearning the techniques.

Another thought is to pick a hard soap and cream combo of the same scent and same brand label that you enjoy. This way, you can start lathering with the soap and use the cream as a back up if your lather isn't adequate.

-joedy

Very good information. And see, that's why I've been wondering about soaps, because I keep seeing that everyone feels it give such better protection; and being a head shaver, that's what I'm looking for and for something that doesn't dry out so quick.

I'd like to enjoy my head shaving time a lot more than I currently do.

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 09-09-2014, 09:52 AM
#14
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Bryan, many of the artisanal soaps would be great candidates for you to consider using as they aren't drying at all. In fact, they are some of the most hydrating soaps you will find, in my opinion. Good luck. Smile

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 09-09-2014, 09:57 AM
#15
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you can buy samples of creams and soaps from Garry's and Maggard Razors.

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 09-09-2014, 10:07 AM
#16
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(09-09-2014, 09:52 AM)celestino Wrote: Bryan, many of the artisanal soaps would be great candidates for you to consider using as they aren't drying at all. In fact, they are some of the most hydrating soaps you will find, in my opinion. Good luck. Smile

(09-09-2014, 09:57 AM)buddingshaver Wrote: you can buy samples of creams and soaps from Garry's and Maggard Razors.

Celestino, that's the Mystic ones, right?

Sudhir, nice to meet you and thanks for the lookout. I'll head over to the websites.

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 09-09-2014, 03:21 PM
#17
  • joedy
  • Member
  • Shenandoah Valley, Virginia
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Queen Charlotte Soaps also has very reasonably priced samples of their creams and soaps.

http://www.queencharlottesoaps.com/Shavi..._c_18.html

-joedy

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 09-09-2014, 07:59 PM
#18
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(09-09-2014, 10:07 AM)C-NoEviL Wrote: Celestino, that's the Mystic ones, right?

* Actually, Bryan, it includes many of the artisanal ones; Mystic Water, Cold River, Mike's, et cetera.
I think you will really enjoy these soaps and good luck. Smile

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 09-10-2014, 08:17 AM
#19
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Right on. Very excited to try some of these out.

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 09-14-2014, 04:08 AM
#20
  • JAYDEE
  • Israeli Ambassador
  • Montreal, Canada
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I used to be mainly a cream user but I've changed to mainly soaps these days.

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