09-10-2014, 03:53 PM
#1
  • mr.jvb
  • Junior Member
  • Ontario Canada
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Good evening gents. I was thinking about the personal significance of the three DEs in my young and modest collection, and how the items in our hobby are kind of like trophy balls are to us golfers. Each represents something special, regardless of the specific brand or model.

My first, a 1972 Gillette Tech, was given to me by my Grandfather.
-The hand-me-down, got one.

My second, an EJ DE-89 was purchased after doing my research and making a decision.
-First 'real' purchase, check.

My third is a 1976 (W2) Gillette black beauty long.
-Birth year and quarter, achieved.

I was thinking that I need to add these ones too:
-A Slant
-Open comb
-A Flea market find
-A Garage sale Goodie

What other 'trophy' DE's do you think a collection has to have? What makes your pieces special to you?

I'm not looking for specific models per se, but what would make it on to the list?




Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk. Any typos are due to autocorrect, not low IQ.

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 09-10-2014, 04:12 PM
#2
  • joedy
  • Member
  • Shenandoah Valley, Virginia
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Can't say you've lived until you've shaved with a slant razor...

-joedy

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 09-10-2014, 04:21 PM
#3
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Vintage SE razor
Injectors
Modern stainless
Modern SE (Cobra, Mongoose, HuntLee)....
(many options for vintage esoterica...)
Straights and their own cans of worms (strops, hones...)
...

Oops, I didn't limit this to DE.

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 09-10-2014, 04:35 PM
#4
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A Schick Krona

31 1,800
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 09-10-2014, 05:00 PM
#5
  • eengler
  • Administrator
  • South Dakota, USA
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Open Comb

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 09-10-2014, 05:20 PM
#6
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A Fatboy!!

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 09-11-2014, 05:48 AM
#7
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I'm a little biased, but if you're the least bit large or clumsy, I'd say a stainless razor has to be in there somewhere.

Sometimes you want a razor that you know isn't going to corrode or break if you screw the handle on too tightly, or drop it into the sink or onto the floor.

There are few things more frustrating than looking at a collection of useless pieces where your razor used to be, halfway through a morning shave when you've got places to be.

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 09-11-2014, 06:50 AM
#8
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a stainless steel razor.

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 09-11-2014, 07:44 AM
#9
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Everyone needs an eBay experience. .. over paying for a razor that is either useless or in worse condition than you expect. There's always that 1 in a million chance you get a great deal on a great razor. .. like you think your getting. .. but you gotta add that experience.

You also need to get a custom razor. ..i mean make a Franken razor. .. mix your favorite handle with your favorite head. .. or get a custom handle like ufo or an ikon or att handle or a wave. ... something that you want to try and do it. I have a stahly live head on an ikon se handle that i like.

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 09-11-2014, 09:22 AM
#10
  • bjorney
  • Senior Member
  • Los Angeles
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Gotta try a single-edge!
Look for a GEM, Ever-ready or Star 1912 or
a GEM Micromatic ( I would avoid the OC Micromatic as a first SE,
but it's great once you are used to it.)

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 09-11-2014, 12:37 PM
#11
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Don't forget the Estate sale special! I've picked up a '58 SS TV special and a '65 Slim, both on excellent condition. Have fun!
Herm2502

Isn't this fun?

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 09-11-2014, 01:56 PM
#12
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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For me I don't really look at it like that. My collection is more based on the different models of DE Gillette and others produced. Not looking for birth year razors, hand me downs, or anything like that. I don't understand the appeal of birth year razors, and certainly not being able to point to something in my collection whose only uniqueness is that I found it in a yard sale, flea market, etc.
I do have razors that are family heirlooms, and they have a proud place in my den, but for me it's the variety of different razors that does it for me. If it's different than what I have, unique in some way, etc., then it is a must have.

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 09-11-2014, 02:05 PM
#13
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(09-11-2014, 01:56 PM)SRNewb Wrote: For me I don't really look at it like that. My collection is more based on the different models of DE Gillette and others produced. Not looking for birth year razors, hand me downs, or anything like that. I don't understand the appeal of birth year razors, and certainly not being able to point to something in my collection whose only uniqueness is that I found it in a yard sale, flea market, etc.
I do have razors that are family heirlooms, and they have a proud place in my den, but for me it's the variety of different razors that does it for me. If it's different than what I have, unique in some way, etc., then it is a must have.

Personally, IMHO, I believe that the appeal for a razor from a specified "birth year" is pretty great for us collectors and even the users. Preferably, cause owning something that isn't produced but passed down from generation to generation makes for a great history lesson or generally conversation. It's awesome, to me, to know that I have something from the early 1900s when so many modern products are not manufactured with the pride and soul that the old world USE to have.

With that being said, JvB, I think a find at a yard sale or flea would be awesome and kind of a "fate" thing.. especially if you are collecting vintage(s) and weren't necessarily looking for anything once found.

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 09-11-2014, 02:11 PM
#14
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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(09-11-2014, 02:05 PM)C-NoEviL Wrote: Personally, IMHO, I believe that the appeal for a razor from a specified "birth year" is pretty great for us collectors and even the users. Preferably, cause owning something that isn't produced but passed down from generation to generation makes for a great history lesson or generally conversation. It's awesome, to me, to know that I have something from the early 1900s when so many modern products are not manufactured with the pride and soul that the old world USE to have.
I get that from every vintage razor I own or use. None of them are my birth year razor. Not knocking the concept, just don't understand it. A razor as old as me? I have several made before I was even born.

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 09-11-2014, 02:23 PM
#15
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Oh, then I must have misunderstood. You are referring to a razor from the year someone was born; so I agree with you. That doesn't have an appeal. Plus there might not even be anything produced from that same year.

My apologies.

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 09-11-2014, 02:25 PM
#16
  • SRNewb
  • Senior Member
  • No. Va, USA
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Hey, anything that gets folks excited about wetshaving! The world would suck if I understood everything, lol.

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 09-11-2014, 02:26 PM
#17
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Haha, tell me about it! Smile

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 09-12-2014, 05:01 PM
#18
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I think straight razors in general make great collector's items. Frankly, I began my modest assortment of them long before I actually ever used one to shave! They just seem so cool, like a bit of nostalgia or a throwback to a bygone era.

PS - Pardon me, I forgot the OP said "DE's" specifically. For a DE I'd have to say a vintage Hoffritz-style open tooth German travel safety razor.

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 09-12-2014, 07:00 PM
#19
  • mr.jvb
  • Junior Member
  • Ontario Canada
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I've been looking at straights for a while now and not sure how to start. I think I'll just finally buy one based on looks when the time is right. I'm still a bit intimidated by honing and stropping. You're right, they are very cool. Would my first straight add to my collection, or start a new one?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk. Any typos are due to autocorrect, not low IQ.

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 09-12-2014, 07:36 PM
#20
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(09-12-2014, 07:00 PM)mr.jvb Wrote: I've been looking at straights for a while now and not sure how to start. I think I'll just finally buy one based on looks when the time is right. I'm still a bit intimidated by honing and stropping. You're right, they are very cool. Would my first straight add to my collection, or start a new one?

I felt that way, too. The last thing I want to do is ruin the edge on a prized straight by stropping or honing incorrectly. And they're all prized to me. I bought my first straight, new, and then bought my first DE about a week later, because it seemed like a compromise between using the straight and risking screwing it up! I'm still learning to use one, but it gets easier as you go, and now I've spent hours and hours reading and watching videos on SR shaving, stropping and honing. The DE is simple. The straight takes time and patience. So I'm alternating between the two as I go, simply because that's how I want to do it. There really are no right and wrongs (except for cutting yourself, and hey, everybody does that sometimes, especially in the beginning).
I bought a nice straight (+/- $160) for my first one, and then three more before I intentionally bought a cheap vintage one ($56) to actually use to practice and learn on. But now I like them all just as much regardless! You can get great vintage ones in the BST forum for little money, and you can tell by the member's profile and previous posts that they know how to hone and that the blades are truly "shave-ready" before you pay. Have fun!

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