09-16-2014, 05:03 PM
#1
  • Niro884
  • Italian Shaving Enthusiast
  • Stoney Creek, Ontario CANADA
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Looking to give straight razor use another try. Have only tried using a Feather and a Parker shavette. Didn't like either. I would like to try a true straight that needs to be stropped and honed. I realize you need to have this equipment if you have a straight. Any advice on a good one to learn on that also doesn't break the bank? Any details on size or make and model would be helpful.

Thanks

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 09-16-2014, 05:11 PM
#2
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(09-16-2014, 05:03 PM)Niro884 Wrote: Looking to give straight razor use another try. Have only tried using a Feather and a Parker shavette. Didn't like either. I would like to try a true straight that needs to be stropped and honed. I realize you need to have this equipment if you have a straight. Any advice on a good one to learn on that also doesn't break the bank? Any details on size or make and model would be helpful.

Thanks

First, for the love of all that is great, don't learn to hone while learning to straight shave. You're asking for trouble.

As for strops, I personally prefer a 3" so I don't have to do the X pattern, but a 2.5" is also nice. Get a double strop with linen, cotton or nylon webbing on the reverse. Most strops which say "linen" aren't. Sad but true.

I suggest going for a vintage blade to start with, nothing Chinese or SE Asian. Just avoid that. Go American, German, Sheffield or Japanese. You can usually find some in BST (*cough*). Just get one which is honed and shave ready.

Until you get stropping down, you should not hone. Stropping incorrectly may damage the strop and dull the blade a bit. Honing incorrectly .... well that's some serious hone work to fix.

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 09-16-2014, 10:18 PM
#3
  • Snuff
  • Senior Member
  • Belgium
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Good advice, I would go look in the BST section also. Doesn't need to cost a lot, also if you can find someone in your area that is willing to show you how to do things correctly that would make a big difference.

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 09-17-2014, 02:22 AM
#4
  • BobH
  • Senior Member
  • Thunder Bay Canada
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Not much to add to the good advice already given. Just want to underscore how important it is that you do get a shave ready razor no matter what. Do not strop a shave ready razor before the first use when you get it. That way you will know what a shave ready razor's edge feels like and you haven't dulled it with beginner stropping technique.

A 5/8 or 6/8 sized razor with a round point is a good starter. Round point as it is less likely that you will cut yourself with the point than with a spike point blade.

Bob

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 09-20-2014, 12:48 PM
#5
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I'm a newbie, too, and I did exactly what all these guys are saying and want to endorse everything they've just said. I got this great little 9/16" with a round point from an experienced member off the BST, truly shave-ready, for only $56 shipped. I didn't strop it until my third shave upon the advice of the member who honed and sold it to me, either. It's not a DOVO or any of the big names, of course, but I'm liking it more and more as I use it and honestly, I value it now just as much as the nice brand-new (or almost brand-new) Solingen straights I bought that I didn't want to learn on should I screw them up by stropping poorly.

PS - I think a bench strop is a great tool for learning how to take your time and learn to strop. I got a 3" one for only about $20 shipped from Star Shaving.

Black Latigo Leather Bench Strop

[Image: G7L2Pq1.jpg]

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