10-10-2014, 11:55 AM
#1
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Now this I find hard to believe, for some reason. A lock pick set for sale on Massdrop - and over 400 of them have sold.
https://www.massdrop.com/buy/southord-lock-pick-set

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 10-10-2014, 12:10 PM
#2
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Must be a lot of locksmiths out there.

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 10-10-2014, 12:11 PM
#3
  • TheMonk
  • Super Moderator
  • Porto, Portugal
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(10-10-2014, 12:10 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Must be a lot of locksmiths out there.

Let's go with that. Biggrin

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 10-11-2014, 08:26 AM
#4
  • urrlord
  • Active Member
  • central georgia usa
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There are also groups of people who play with locks as a hobby.I think one of these hobbyist groups discovered the "bump key technique".Which was then picked up by the criminal types.At least IIRC that was the subject and conclusion of an investigative report several years ago.

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 10-11-2014, 06:05 PM
#5
  • Harvid
  • Junior Member
  • London ON, Canada
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(10-11-2014, 08:26 AM)urrlord Wrote: There are also groups of people who play with locks as a hobby.I think one of these hobbyist groups discovered the "bump key technique".Which was then picked up by the criminal types.At least IIRC that was the subject and conclusion of an investigative report several years ago.
People obsessed with locks? That sounds crazy. Why would you be obsessed with locks? Anyway, time to get back to things more worthwhile like reading about shaving for the next few hours

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 10-12-2014, 09:49 PM
#6
  • Johnny
  • MODERATOR EMERITUS
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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I use to be obsessed with railroad locks. At one time I had over 100 different types of railroad locks from about 20 different railroads. Most all of the locks had keys. I sold my collection about 8-years ago to a railroad fanatic for a handsome sum of money. Biggrin

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 10-12-2014, 11:31 PM
#7
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I'm one of those sad types that picks locks as a "now and again" hobby. Originally it was going to be a all back trade in these uncertain times but having bought a few bits and pieces it is now more of a hobby to waste an hour or two


Can't really explain the appeal but it's definetly a skill, (well picking is, not using bump keys) that has to be practiced and there is something I enjoy in understanding how these highly engineered locks work and then bypassing them with bent bits of metal

Just another big kid thing, especially if you like gadgets and interesting tools that you can't (officially) buy over the counter.

Oh, and once you are registered you can buy locks and tools at trade prices which is quite a eye opener

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 10-13-2014, 03:12 AM
#8
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seems quite popular - and sell as advanced puzzles

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 10-13-2014, 08:20 PM
#9
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It definitely is a skill! Smile

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 10-13-2014, 09:04 PM
#10
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(10-12-2014, 11:31 PM)Jpshaver Wrote: I'm one of those sad types that picks locks as a "now and again" hobby. Originally it was going to be a all back trade in these uncertain times but having bought a few bits and pieces it is now more of a hobby to waste an hour or two


Can't really explain the appeal but it's definetly a skill, (well picking is, not using bump keys) that has to be practiced and there is something I enjoy in understanding how these highly engineered locks work and then bypassing them with bent bits of metal

Just another big kid thing, especially if you like gadgets and interesting tools that you can't (officially) buy over the counter.

Oh, and once you are registered you can buy locks and tools at trade prices which is quite a eye opener

JPS', I've seen what appear to be some sort of "motorized" lock picker. Have you ever used them and how do they work? I'm just curious, not planning a career in B&E .

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 10-13-2014, 09:16 PM
#11
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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Why mess around with a pick lock? Just use a shotty and blast your way in Smile

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 10-13-2014, 09:27 PM
#12
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 10-13-2014, 10:24 PM
#13
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Kind of a fun skill to learn. I didn't get as far as Jpshaver, but sounds like the motivations were pretty similar.

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 10-14-2014, 10:23 AM
#14
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As a retired locksmith, I can tell you that there are many out there that work with locks as a hobby and some are quite skilled at opening various types of locks. And there are electric (battery) powered picks that work well on common type locks.

However, please be aware of local laws/regulations concerning the use of these tools. In Louisiana, where I live, unless you are a state licensed locksmith you can be charged with a felony if caught with locksmithing tools. And picks are considered tools.

Just thought y'all might like to know.

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 10-14-2014, 11:05 PM
#15
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(10-13-2014, 09:04 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote:
(10-12-2014, 11:31 PM)Jpshaver Wrote: I'm one of those sad types that picks locks as a "now and again" hobby. Originally it was going to be a all back trade in these uncertain times but having bought a few bits and pieces it is now more of a hobby to waste an hour or two


Can't really explain the appeal but it's definetly a skill, (well picking is, not using bump keys) that has to be practiced and there is something I enjoy in understanding how these highly engineered locks work and then bypassing them with bent bits of metal

Just another big kid thing, especially if you like gadgets and interesting tools that you can't (officially) buy over the counter.

Oh, and once you are registered you can buy locks and tools at trade prices which is quite a eye opener

JPS', I've seen what appear to be some sort of "motorized" lock picker. Have you ever used them and how do they work? I'm just curious, not planning a career in B&E .

These are pick guns. Some are manual and work under spring tension (in one burst) whilst others are battery. They work by vibrating the lock pins very quickly whilst a tension bar applies a small amount of pressure. The idea is that the pins with "catch" above the sheer line while bouncing up and down allowing the barrel to turn. As with all picking, it is the tension applied that is the real secret. Too much and the pins won't move, too little an they just fall back into place. When tension is spot on an due to the inaccuracies of the manufacturing process, the pins stick above the sheer line. It doesn't work like it looks in the movies that's for sure, and some locks just won't pick whatever you throw at it. That's when the drill comes out

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 10-17-2014, 12:42 PM
#16
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I've always had an interest in wanting to learn to pick locks. I have picked a few laptop locks over the years (mind you I'm in the IT profession so it wasn't totally wasted time!).

I never did buy a pick set or spend too much time learning the craft though. maybe someday...

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 10-24-2014, 06:29 AM
#17
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Had a locksmith in HI try and pick my house lock so I could get my car keys. Says he has to drill the lock, but left his pick tools out. Before he is back, I have my car keys and happily pay just the call fee.

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 10-25-2014, 11:08 PM
#18
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Thanks JPS. My curiosity has been satisfied.

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