10-20-2014, 09:18 PM
#1
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Does the brush have to stand with the bristles down(in a stand)?

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 10-20-2014, 09:54 PM
#2
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There are claims made for upright or in a stand, but my understanding is that when actually tested there are no detectable differences. If I bought a brush and the manufacturer recommended one method over the other, I would probably go with that. Otherwise based on the empirical data I think you can do whatever you prefer.

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 10-21-2014, 12:10 AM
#3
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do you mean for drying the brush - or do you mean longtime storing or for a few days/weeks?

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 10-21-2014, 04:06 AM
#4
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The following instructions come with new Simpson brushes:
Please ensure your Simpson shaving brush is thoroughly rinsed in warm clean water after use & is free from all soap or cream residue within the knot. Shake gently & stroke on a soft bath towel to remove any excess moisture before standing in a well vented area to dry (preferably near an open window).

After every use I stroke on a bath towel and stand the brush close to the window.

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 10-21-2014, 04:10 AM
#5
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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I seem to recall an experiment conducted here in the Nook that concluded standing the brush upright (it's why they have a flat base) means the brush dries a bit more quickly. The moisture sublimates off into the air, not up into the bristles. I have my brushes standing; not problems drying.

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 10-21-2014, 05:21 AM
#6
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No, your brushes will last for many years standing upright, just shake and squeeze out excess water and give it at least a day to dry thoroughly if you want to store it in a confined space/air-tight container.

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 10-21-2014, 07:16 AM
#7
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I have done it both ways. Before I had a stand I just shook out the brush really good and set it bristles up on its handle. Almost a year of daily shaving like that with NO PROBLEMS. I then was gifted a stand so now it hangs upside down and again NO PROBLEMS. I find it aesthetically pleasing in a stand but I would be just fine without one too. In fact when I travel out of town I don't use a stand. Just be sure to rinse and shake very well.

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 10-21-2014, 07:26 AM
#8
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I don't think it matters. I used to hang brushes on a stand. About 3 years ago I stopped using the stand and have not noticed a difference. I actually think my brushes may dry slightly faster on their base. What is more important than whether you use a stand or not is the post shave routine with the brush. I hold the brush at the base of the knot and gently shake out excess water. I then gently strop the brush a few times on a towel. Finally, I stand it to dry in an open area for a minimum of 24 hours.

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 10-21-2014, 07:38 AM
#9
  • Kavik79
  • Active Member
  • Albany, NY - USA
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Mine stand on their base, never had a problem

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 10-21-2014, 07:45 AM
#10
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No, they don't need to be in a stand upside down. In fact, you could make the (extremely hypothetical and very, very minute) argument its better to have them standing "up" on their base. The capillary action phenomenon is that water will travel along a narrow area, even in contravention of gravity. The water then evaporates into vapor, rising (usually) up. So on its base, the water in the brush should move up along along the bristles and then evaporate upward.

But if you have a brush upside down, the water will still travel outward (now down), and evaporate into vapor, but now instead of (usually) moving upward and away from the brush, the vapor will rise right back into the brush itself.

Like I wrote, this is probably barely detectable and almost purely hypothetical, but I think about this whenever someone writes "brushes should be stored upside down on a stand." I think the correct answer is truly: either way is fine.

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 10-21-2014, 08:38 AM
#11
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(10-21-2014, 07:45 AM)jpakstis Wrote: But if you have a brush upside down, the water will still travel outward (now down), and evaporate into vapor, but now instead of (usually) moving upward and away from the brush, the vapor will rise right back into the brush itself.

so - with this argument - the brush would stay forever wet - and also contradicts with 'either way is fine'.
my friend - you have invented the perpetuum mobile Biggrin

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 10-21-2014, 08:43 AM
#12
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I agree with what seems to be the consensus here: As long as you get the excess water out, you'll probably be fine. I think many would also say that you'd want to place the brush somewhere where it can dry.

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 10-21-2014, 09:15 AM
#13
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(10-21-2014, 08:38 AM)tonsorius Wrote: so - with this argument - the brush would stay forever wet - and also contradicts with 'either way is fine'.
my friend - you have invented the perpetuum mobile Biggrin

Who says that wetshaving is a waste of time!

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 10-21-2014, 09:24 AM
#14
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No need for a brush stand! All brushes will dry very well without one.

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