10-22-2014, 11:04 AM
#1
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Hi everyone -


So I thought I'd throw this out there as topic to ruminate on. At work during lunch we'll talk about our "dream jobs," the caveats being:

(1) It has be either something you make or a tangible service you provide.
(2) It has to be something you'd "sell" in a storefront.

The reasons for the caveats are that you can't just say "I'd be a 'Masters of the Universe' investment banker and make a billion dollars and retire." The range of responses among my co-workers were what I found interesting.

So what say you? (I'm sure the artisans here probably already have their answers!) My "dream job" would be a butcher. Upon thinking a little bit about it, I realized that I enjoy learning about cuts of meat and breaking them down and developing new ways to use cuts and "scraps."

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 10-22-2014, 11:18 AM
#2
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one of my dream "jobs" would be making (handmade) fly fishing reels.

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 10-22-2014, 11:21 AM
#3
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A job I dreamed about for years was one in which I had a beachfront shop on the coast in Oregon, and in the shop I would have had a half-time allergy medical practice (which I did full-time in real life) open only 9-12 in the morning and a driftwood sculpture retail shop open only 2-5 in the afternoon. During my 2-hour lunch break I could stroll on the beach.

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 10-22-2014, 12:39 PM
#4
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Producing a song as a life soundtrack to every person I meet. It would be an instrumental.

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 10-22-2014, 01:06 PM
#5
  • davizera
  • Non Dvcor Dvco
  • São Paulo - Brazil
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A huge passion of mine is politics, but I wouldn't be able to sell it in a storefront, so If I could I'd pursue this dream.

There another one that I wouldn't be able to sell either, but If I could I wanted to dedicate my life to study, understand, and research astrophysics, astronomy and number theory.

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 10-22-2014, 01:13 PM
#6
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One idea I'm playing with is taking up woodworking, a lathe specificity, so I have something to do when I retire. And the results would have to be sold or given away, so... Wink

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 10-22-2014, 01:36 PM
#7
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what a wonderful combination that would have been! Bow

(10-22-2014, 11:21 AM)churchilllafemme Wrote: A job I dreamed about for years was one in which I had a beachfront shop on the coast in Oregon, and in the shop I would have had a half-time allergy medical practice (which I did full-time in real life) open only 9-12 in the morning and a driftwood sculpture retail shop open only 2-5 in the afternoon. During my 2-hour lunch break I could stroll on the beach.

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 10-22-2014, 10:18 PM
#8
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Not a commodity that can be sold out of a store, but it's the selling of knowledge and ability. Actually my dream job would be being a semi-retired firearms instructor. I have the semi-retired part down, and I have the credentials, and I teach at times, but not nearly often enough. It's very rewarding to take a newbie who has never handled a firearm, and might even be a bit afraid, and turn that person into a competent shooter who can defend self and family. I've often commented to others that I want a career turning loaded ammo into fired brass, and this is that job. In some ways it's more enjoyable to watch others do the same.

I do however, enjoy the after the shave business. But it chose me, I didn't choose it. I just had the skills to make it work. So far it's quite challenging. Being retired from one endeavor, I now pick and choose what I do and if it isn't fun I simply don't do it. I like challenges. Some times I doubt that I actually sell anything because there is so much outgo. But I think I actually do sell stuff. I've met some mighty fine people through it and that in itself is quite rewarding.

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 10-23-2014, 10:48 AM
#9
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Samurai sword craftsman! Biggrin

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 10-23-2014, 06:43 PM
#10
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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A nearly dead retail niche- used and rare bookshop. I would have leather club chairs, Russian brass Samovar with free tea and allow pipesmoking. Male patrons would have to wear ties and women dresses. A cat of great gravitas would vet
people as they enter. Music would be eclectic, but subdued; Mozart to Edith Piaf. The floors- the whole place would creak as you walked on old Persian runners down aisles designed to conceal young lovers stealing kisses.
The books would be all the forgotten treasures or classics each generation should rediscover. Children buying THE LITTLE PRINCE would get an old 50 franc NOTE AS BOOKMARK AND TAUGHT TO PRONOUNCE Antoine DE Saint-Exupery Correctly.
I would have curios to explain countless books without annotation. I brought in a .30-06 SOLID and 6.5x54 Mannlicher to a college teacher who 'didn't get' Hemingway or THE GREEN HILS OF AFRICA.She asked 'Why did I have those bullets?' (sic) I replied ' because I own a Griffen & Howe and Mannlicher.'
She replied ' are those British or german sports cars?'- She knew I drove a MGA coupe and Mini Cooper.
THAT is why we need real bookstores.

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 10-24-2014, 03:11 AM
#11
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There is an old building in the downtown where I now live called 'The Antique Blade'

I think it would be great to open it up and have a knife and straight razor shop with a lathe in the back making brushes and bowls. I would also include sharpening and honing services.

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 10-24-2014, 04:19 AM
#12
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(10-23-2014, 10:48 AM)celestino Wrote: Samurai sword craftsman! Biggrin

dear celestino - a few years ago i was asked by a friend that had this as his dream - and to find out his chances for it to actually happen.

a well known american art dealer and friend of mine residing in japan had a close pal that happened to be one of the largest collectors of swords anywhere. my american friend put me in contact with him - and i got my answer:

it is entirely possible to become a samurai swords craftsman - and be taken in as a full time pupil with a famous sword smith - but

1. you have to speak and write japanese fluently
2. you must have a wish to devote all your time for the future for this one cause

naturally my friend had to give up - becuse of the language barrier - but he became a viking sword smith instead Biggrin

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 10-24-2014, 11:05 AM
#13
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Josh, Interesting question, thanks.

I would love to have a small shop where I could bake and sell artisan breads. There's something magical about bread dough fermenting.

Combined with a small lunch menu and some good coffee, it would be a lot of fun.

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 10-24-2014, 12:06 PM
#14
  • Gago
  • Active Member
  • Rio de Janeirto
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I dream of opening a Shenaningan's !Rolleyes

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 10-24-2014, 12:25 PM
#15
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(10-24-2014, 11:05 AM)redrako Wrote: I would love to have a small shop where I could bake and sell artisan breads. There's something magical about bread dough fermenting.

Combined with a small lunch menu and some good coffee, it would be a lot of fun.

here is one norwegian guy - morten schakenda - that did just that: bakeriet i lom (sorry - only in norwegian. click top menu 'om bakeriet' and 'produkter' to see some pics). wood fired oven.

[Image: w73gd51.jpg]

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 10-24-2014, 12:59 PM
#16
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Marius, I was drooling looking at the photos of his breads. Biggrin

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 10-24-2014, 01:00 PM
#17
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Now that's a guy doing what he likes and making a lot of dough. Perfect. Biggrin

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 10-24-2014, 01:03 PM
#18
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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(10-24-2014, 01:00 PM)rsp1202 Wrote: Now that's a guy doing what he likes and making a lot of dough. Perfect. Biggrin

Groan! Facepalm ( 24 )

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 10-24-2014, 01:26 PM
#19
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Indeed! Groan!

(10-23-2014, 06:43 PM)kav Wrote: A nearly dead retail niche- used and rare bookshop. I would have leather club chairs, Russian brass Samovar with free tea and allow pipesmoking. Male patrons would have to wear ties and women dresses. A cat of great gravitas would vet
people as they enter. Music would be eclectic, but subdued; Mozart to Edith Piaf. The floors- the whole place would creak as you walked on old Persian runners down aisles designed to conceal young lovers stealing kisses.
The books would be all the forgotten treasures or classics each generation should rediscover. Children buying THE LITTLE PRINCE would get an old 50 franc NOTE AS BOOKMARK AND TAUGHT TO PRONOUNCE Antoine DE Saint-Exupery Correctly.
I would have curios to explain countless books without annotation. I brought in a .30-06 SOLID and 6.5x54 Mannlicher to a college teacher who 'didn't get' Hemingway or THE GREEN HILS OF AFRICA.She asked 'Why did I have those bullets?' (sic) I replied ' because I own a Griffen & Howe and Mannlicher.'
She replied ' are those British or german sports cars?'- She knew I drove a MGA coupe and Mini Cooper.
THAT is why we need real bookstores.

KAV, you have no idea (maybe you do) how few Americans have a clue what a SOLID is or even what it's used for. Karamojo Bell made good use of them.

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 10-24-2014, 02:10 PM
#20
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Marius, lovely photos of real bread! Biggrin

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