11-04-2014, 07:04 PM
#1
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This is more of a what's going to happen thread. But I'll keep it updated.

I pulled a brisket out of the freezer the other day and have it thawing in the shop refrigerator. It's still quite solid when last I checked it.

We have friends, the gent of the couple dislikes cooked celery as much as I do, but I don't think he's ever had celeriac, aka celery root, the bulb of which is diced and used in place of celery stalks in soups and stews. It holds it's texture and tastes like, you guessed it, celery. We grew some this summer and pulled them out of the ground a few days ago, o it's time to use them. They'll only be over for beef stew and a 3D movie, but I look forward to seeing how he likes the celeriac.

That will leave quite a bit of the brisket for another use. I haven't had sauerbraten since I was a child, so sauerbraten it is. The meat needs to pickle for a time, so it certainly won't be before next week, at the earliest, that I can even think about cooking it. I'm looking forward to it though. I'll use my Grandmothers sauerbraten recipe, but update the spices a bit to better utilize what's available today.

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 11-04-2014, 07:39 PM
#2
  • Chris24
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I had to Google sauerbraten. Sounds very nice.

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 11-04-2014, 08:22 PM
#3
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A Mainer making sauerbraten...is your heritage qualified?

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 11-04-2014, 11:14 PM
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Biggrin Absolutely!

My lineage is actually Prussian, so yes, I think I'm qualified. :-) Most folks today would know Prussia to be part of Germany, except my starving peasant ancestors left before it was called Germany, hence, I'm Prussian. Just to maybe confuse the issue, or maybe clarify it, when I was stationed in Germany '71-73, many of the Germans who heard or read my last name called me Herr Krampert. So I assumed that they recognized it.

Heck, it's my Grandmothers recipe too and I KNOW she was qualified. Biggrin

FWIW, the recipe actually calls for top round (I think), but I don't know why brisket won't work.

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 11-05-2014, 07:41 AM
#5
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I see. You may proceed then brother...we have to check these things out first ya know.

As for me, Yes, I would qualify in making sauerbraten as well. When my German ancestors came to Texas they where looking for a place to settle when the came upon a huge group of Live Oak trees. The leader looked up in the branches and mistakenly thought moss was sauerkraut. So they made it their home.Tongue

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 11-05-2014, 01:52 PM
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(11-05-2014, 07:41 AM)DoctorShaveGood Wrote: I see. You may proceed then brother...we have to check these things out first ya know.

As for me, Yes, I would qualify in making sauerbraten as well. When my German ancestors came to Texas they where looking for a place to settle when the came upon a huge group of Live Oak trees. The leader looked up in the branches and mistakenly thought moss was sauerkraut. So they made it their home.Tongue

That's too funny!

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 11-08-2014, 02:32 PM
#7
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Update

The brisket was broken down today. It was a packer brisket, which means it was the entire brisket (the primal cut); think untrimmed and both the flat and the point still connected. Sorry, I didn't think to take pix of that. There will be more briskets.

I cut what I needed for the stew from the rest of the flat and point and removed the fat cap. Then cubed the remaining and quite lean flat. But fat contains flavor and I'm going to need some grease or oil to brown the meat in before I simmer it to make it tender. One can use a foreign oil (foreign to beef that is), or one can use rendered beef fat. I just happen to have a great deal of fat that I just removed from the brisket. Can you guess which fat/oil that I'll use? Of course I'll render the beef fat. The crispy cracklins will mostly go to the dogs, but at least a few will need to be tested by the cook and his wife. Salted they are delicious. The resulting fat will be mostly poured off, but some will be used to brown the stew meat in. I want my stew to taste like beef and not grapeseed or olive oil. Contrary to popular belief, a little bit of fat won't hurt you. Everything in moderation. If I had time I would refrigerate the meat and simmering juices and skim off the coagulated fat from the top of the gelatin. But I won't have that time, so I'll do the best I can. The packet of fat that I'll render is seen in a packet in with the stew meat.

While the brisket was out and being worked on it was a great time to put together the meat for the sauerbraten. It's sitting in a bag with the pickle juices. It needs to be turned once a day, and it must stay in there for at least 3 days to pickle. The refrigerator it's in hovers near 32°F and there are no hands constantly opening the door, so spoilage isn't a factor. I've kept meat in there without spoilage for over a month. So I can easily meet the 3 day minimum requirement. I'm in no hurry to cook the sauerbraten. We'll get to it when we need it. I left the point connected to the flat and it has a large seam of fat connecting both muscles. But that's not a big deal. Unless we want to eat it the same day it's cooked, I'll allow it to cool down and the grease to float and firm up for removal. The sauerbraten is on the left in the picture.

>>>>>>>> Click here to see the picture <<<<<<<<<

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 11-08-2014, 05:19 PM
#8
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It all sounds good, making want to cook a brisket at least!

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 11-08-2014, 11:51 PM
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Mike I hadn't cooked a brisket in literally years because I couldn't find any at less than steak prices. For what they wanted for it I'll eat steak instead. But not long ago our butcher got a mess of them and while not priced the way they were 10 years ago, they were priced OK for today. We bought a mess of 'em. I wish I had more room in the freezer at the time, but we stuffed it as it was. I wanted to buy more and can 50 - 100# but SWMBO didn't want to. Canned beef and broth can be used for so much and it's easy to can meat, or anything else for that matter.

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 11-09-2014, 08:48 AM
#10
  • Chris24
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Wow brisket the same price as steak, that's crazy.

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 11-10-2014, 12:24 AM
#11
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Yeah, I couldn't believe it either Chris. But that was the price for years.

FWIW, tonight was stew night and we had guests over. They'd never had celeriac before and both he and I detest cooked celery. That was the purpose of this stew; so that they could experience celeriac (aka celery root). Normally I wouldn't serve stew to guests. They liked it. He went back for seconds and wanted to try for thirds but couldn't. She had a small second helping. I also employ some other "tricks" with stew. Like thickening it slightly with a dark roux and also to lend that dark roux flavor.

She brought roasted garlic for the bread. I wanted to make the no knead crusty loaf, but forgot to put it together the night before, so I made 2 hour yeast rolls instead. They were good. If anyone wants the recipe just let me know. They're best made with a mixer, but I suppose they can be kneaded by hand. I've never done that though. I'm pretty much so busy when I'm cooking that I just start the mixer and set its timer so that it stops when the kneading is done. Yeast rolls might seem daunting but these are fairly easy and definitely quick.

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 11-10-2014, 10:59 AM
#12
  • freddy
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Brian, why don't you like cooked celery? I should think it would enhance the flavor of something like a stew. Just curious.

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 11-10-2014, 03:59 PM
#13
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If it was juiced I'd probably like it cooked with, but instead of water. But after it's cooked it's like tofu to me; flavorless and just existing but not worth chewing. Now celeriac actually has flavor, and it's still celery; or a very close relative.

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 11-10-2014, 04:10 PM
#14
  • freddy
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Interesting. While I have, in the past, cooked with celery, I have never cooked with celeriac even though it is readily available.

P.S. I LIKE tofu! (Okay, so I'm even weirder than you originally thought. 24 )

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 11-10-2014, 05:05 PM
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I like tofu a great deal more a few hours after I eat it. The same goes for other soy products, miso specifically. It makes for quite spectacular aftereffects. It never fails to get attention among close friends.

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 11-11-2014, 07:38 AM
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(11-10-2014, 05:05 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I like tofu a great deal more a few hours after I eat it. The same goes for other soy products, miso specifically. It makes for quite spectacular aftereffects. It never fails to get attention among close friends.


Tofu Zombie
[Image: 6vFMmjP.jpg]

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 11-16-2014, 04:58 PM
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Dang! I cooked the Sauerbraten tonight with a caramelized onion potato gratin and veggies cooked in the broth (before turning it into gravy) but forgot to take pix as we had a guest over. Hopefully I'll remember pix tomorrow.

FWIW, it's the first sauerbraten I've had in decades and it was delicious. I figure once or twice a year would be really good for a definite change of pace.

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 11-17-2014, 04:11 PM
#18
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As promised, a picture.

[Image: DSC04172_zpsd5ec7369.jpg]

The almost potato looking veg' next to the carrots is celeriac.

Picture taken before putting gravy on the meat (for clarity).

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 11-17-2014, 06:00 PM
#19
  • freddy
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That looks sensational, Brian! ClapHambre

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 11-17-2014, 08:39 PM
#20
  • Chris24
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That brisket looks like it would melt in your mouth.

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