11-20-2014, 02:28 PM
#1
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Gents,

I have a Nespresso and really enjoy it but I feel like I'm missing out on the art form that comes with preparing a nice espresso using a more Traditional machine and method.

I just had someone give me a brand new Starbucks Barista Athena and am less than impressed with the quality of the crema on the shots I am pulling using this machine.

My friend has a Sirena and when I use it at his home in can make a very good cup of espresso that rivals my others friends Rancilio and Gaggia higher end machines.

So what say you connoisseurs of espresso..Is there anything I have hope of finding used below $200 that will give a decent espresso with good crema and nice temperature?

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 11-21-2014, 09:01 AM
#2
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What grinder do you have?

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 11-21-2014, 09:32 AM
#3
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I can't say I'm a connoisseur, but I've had a Briel that I like very much. The model I have has stellar reviews on Amazon, but it's no longer available. The newer ones seem to have a reputation for making great espresso, but having spotty quality.

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 11-21-2014, 11:22 AM
#4
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Which model do you have Brian?

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 11-21-2014, 01:26 PM
#5
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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This is what I have. I bought mine on sale for about $70 US:

https://www.sunbeam.com.au/Coffee-and-Be...resso.aspx

Makes great coffee.

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 11-26-2014, 01:47 AM
#6
  • ojinsa
  • Senior Member
  • San Antonio
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This is a tricky question, for many reasons. Most people will tell you that a quality grinder is at least equally important, and possibly more important, than the machine itself. Most quality grinders start at apprx $300, but there are some good crank-style grinders that are less expensive.

For machines, there are many used machines at varying price points. I have bought several used machines, in good condition, at varying price points. Shoot me a PM if you are having some difficulties finding one you like. I may have one for you.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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 11-26-2014, 01:41 PM
#7
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(11-21-2014, 11:22 AM)Boonie21 Wrote: Which model do you have Brian?

I have the Chamonix. It's a more entry-level machine (still pump-driven though) that retailed for something like $240.

I can't speak to the quality issues some have had with the brand, but the Briel espresso machine and burr grinder I have have been reliable.

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 11-26-2014, 03:13 PM
#8
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i will say this: norwegian tim wendelboe became the 2004 world barista champion and 2005 world cup tasting champion. if i remember correctly, the only machine he had used and trained on prior to this was a second hand rancilio silvia.

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 03-01-2016, 10:25 AM
#9
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I like traditional lever machines since they provide a broader spectrum to the cup. Ramping pressure and true preinfusion are native to lever machines. Also like the fact that they take up little space and have fewer parts to contend with.
Here is mine http://shavenook.com/showthread.php?tid=...#pid671465

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 03-01-2016, 12:33 PM
#10
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Keep in mind that for a traditional portafilter to get a consistent pour at the right pressure and speed requires a quality grinder, one that is more than your $200 machine budget.

This requirement is alleviated by a pressurized portafilter, such as those in a Saeco Aroma or Gaggia Classic. So I'd point you in the direction of those machines. If you go for a Rancilio Silvia prepare to spend $300 for a Baratza Preciso or Vario grinder to get the grind and adjustability needed.

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