11-22-2014, 06:23 PM
#1
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My wife, Mary Lou, is a 4th grade special education teacher. She bought 5 Pilot Varsity disposable fountain pens for the classroom.

Pen usage is a reward for good work or behavior. The kids love them and pass them around to use all the available colors. One girl talked about them so much her mother came to school to see what they were. ML gave Mom a link and that child will receive the Varsity 8 pack for Christmas.

This parent and ML have noted the kids pay more attention and have better handwriting due to the fountain pens. Chrissy posted similar findings with her son and a pen Freddy sent him.

After ML introduced the pens a child requested to use them as opposed to receiving a sticker or stamp. He knew the pens name had something to do with water spraying but the word "fountain" eluded him. His brain filled in a suitable synonym - "waterfall" pen. And that is what all her students now call themSmile

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 11-22-2014, 07:06 PM
#2
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Phil, please tell Mary Lou how wonderful your post made me feel. Thank you Mary Lou. Thumbup

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 11-23-2014, 12:48 PM
#3
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Excellent post, Phil! The magic of writing with a beautiful instrument! Biggrin

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 11-23-2014, 01:43 PM
#4
  • evnpar
  • Emeritus
  • Portland, Oregon
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Wonderful post, Phil. I grew up in Twin Falls, Idaho and would have been in elementary school in the early 50's, where we learned handwriting with fountain pens. Weekly, we'd take out ink bottle from the hole in our desk, to have it filled, and we'd pick up a new pen nib for use the following week. Handwriting was taught using the Palmer method. Now there is a movement against handwriting in the public schools, with an emphasis on "paperless" classrooms, using only an iPad. Interestingly, there have been several neurodevelopment studies finding that learning handwriting at an early age helps development of the brain, as there are so many different muscle movements involved, and that the child will learn at an accelerated rate over his/her lifetime, compared to those who don't learn handwriting. I would much rather send a note handwritten with a fountain pen to a friend, than to send them an email.

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 11-23-2014, 03:59 PM
#5
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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(11-23-2014, 01:43 PM)evnpar Wrote: Wonderful post, Phil. I grew up in Twin Falls, Idaho and would have been in elementary school in the early 50's, where we learned handwriting with fountain pens. Weekly, we'd take out ink bottle from the hole in our desk, to have it filled, and we'd pick up a new pen nib for use the following week. Handwriting was taught using the Palmer method. Now there is a movement against handwriting in the public schools, with an emphasis on "paperless" classrooms, using only an iPad. Interestingly, there have been several neurodevelopment studies finding that learning handwriting at an early age helps development of the brain, as there are so many different muscle movements involved, and that the child will learn at an accelerated rate over his/her lifetime, compared to those who don't learn handwriting. I would much rather send a note handwritten with a fountain pen to a friend, than to send them an email.

Oh, a HUGE +1 to all that you have written here.

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 11-24-2014, 09:43 AM
#6
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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I have my Waterman with paper next to the Laptop to record items of importBiggrin
I had a elective class in MORSE CODE with Mr Nolet in JHS. Students either utterly feared or loved him. The school district 'allowed' him to teach it after a near catatonic student traumatised in an car crash that killed his father was put in our English class. He just sat there.
Mr Nolet noticed he responded to the classroom lights turning on. They went into a dark room with a flashlight and two weeks later the boy began opening up to a Psychologist THROUGH MORSE and eventually recovered.
I remember the day Morse was discontinued at sea in the service. It was like a songbird going extinct.

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 11-24-2014, 01:00 PM
#7
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Great post!!! thank you very much, I think I will go pick up a handful of "disposable fountain pens" as gifts.

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 11-25-2014, 08:08 AM
#8
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(11-22-2014, 07:06 PM)freddy Wrote: Phil, please tell Mary Lou how wonderful your post made me feel. Thank you Mary Lou. Thumbup

freddy,
Did you enjoy the post because you were an educator? Or because you like seeing ML as an "enabler" like you?Biggrin

(11-23-2014, 01:43 PM)evnpar Wrote: Now there is a movement against handwriting in the public schools, with an emphasis on "paperless" classrooms, using only an iPad. Interestingly, there have been several neurodevelopment studies finding that learning handwriting at an early age helps development of the brain, as there are so many different muscle movements involved, and that the child will learn at an accelerated rate over his/her lifetime, compared to those who don't learn handwriting. I would much rather send a note handwritten with a fountain pen to a friend, than to send them an email.

Richard,
I think most educators would agree with you.

Interesting that you mention ipads. In Mary Lou's classroom there is a shared ipad. It is on the "rewards" and "quiet time" list. Since introducing the fountain pens a month ago the pens have supplanted the ipad as the most requested item. Wow.

Recently a special education aide left and ML had the students make goodbye cards. She set out the usual art supplies. The kids looked around, saw they were missing and requested the fountain pens to use. ML said the kids enjoy them but are also aware that their handwriting is better with the fountain pens.

Phil

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 11-25-2014, 10:21 AM
#9
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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(11-25-2014, 08:08 AM)PhilNH5 Wrote:
(11-22-2014, 07:06 PM)freddy Wrote: Phil, please tell Mary Lou how wonderful your post made me feel. Thank you Mary Lou. Thumbup

freddy,
Did you enjoy the post because you were an educator? Or because you like seeing ML as an "enabler" like you?Biggrin

(11-23-2014, 01:43 PM)evnpar Wrote: Now there is a movement against handwriting in the public schools, with an emphasis on "paperless" classrooms, using only an iPad. Interestingly, there have been several neurodevelopment studies finding that learning handwriting at an early age helps development of the brain, as there are so many different muscle movements involved, and that the child will learn at an accelerated rate over his/her lifetime, compared to those who don't learn handwriting. I would much rather send a note handwritten with a fountain pen to a friend, than to send them an email.

Richard,
I think most educators would agree with you.

Interesting that you mention ipads. In Mary Lou's classroom there is a shared ipad. It is on the "rewards" and "quiet time" list. Since introducing the fountain pens a month ago the pens have supplanted the ipad as the most requested item. Wow.

Recently a special education aide left and ML had the students make goodbye cards. She set out the usual art supplies. The kids looked around, saw they were missing and requested the fountain pens to use. ML said the kids enjoy them but are also aware that their handwriting is better with the fountain pens.

Phil

Phil, both! Winky

What Richard wrote is what I argued while I was still teaching, that is, do not drop penmanship from the curriculum. It all fell on deaf ears. Sad

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 11-28-2014, 10:35 PM
#10
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WooHooooo!!! Excellent job of enabling ML! I am seeing more beginner fountain pens on the market than in the past. The Pilot Varsity is as good as any, and I can see that kids would love all the different colors. The sealed pen minimizes any bad ink spills and they aren't horrible to write with either. I keep one in my travel bag.

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 12-01-2014, 08:07 AM
#11
  • Johnny
  • MODERATOR EMERITUS
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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I asked my 8 year old grandson to write his name and of course he printed it. I asked him to do it in cursive and he asked, what's that. Very sad indeed.

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 12-01-2014, 12:16 PM
#12
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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(12-01-2014, 08:07 AM)Johnny Wrote: I asked my 8 year old grandson to write his name and of course he printed it. I asked him to do it in cursive and he asked, what's that. Very sad indeed.

In all fairness, Johnny, eight used to be on the borderline as to when cursive was taught. However, in your and my day we certainly would have known what it was even if we could not yet use it.

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 12-01-2014, 01:29 PM
#13
  • Johnny
  • MODERATOR EMERITUS
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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(12-01-2014, 12:16 PM)freddy Wrote:
(12-01-2014, 08:07 AM)Johnny Wrote: I asked my 8 year old grandson to write his name and of course he printed it. I asked him to do it in cursive and he asked, what's that. Very sad indeed.

In all fairness, Johnny, eight used to be on the borderline as to when cursive was taught. However, in your and my day we certainly would have known what it was even if we could not yet use it.

When I see my grandkids at Christmas I will ask my 14 year old granddaughter who is a straight A student if she can write her name. I highly doubt she can, and if she does the penmanship will probably be very poor.

Here in Wausau writing is not on the school curriculum at any age.

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 12-01-2014, 03:22 PM
#14
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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(12-01-2014, 01:29 PM)Johnny Wrote:
(12-01-2014, 12:16 PM)freddy Wrote:
(12-01-2014, 08:07 AM)Johnny Wrote: I asked my 8 year old grandson to write his name and of course he printed it. I asked him to do it in cursive and he asked, what's that. Very sad indeed.

In all fairness, Johnny, eight used to be on the borderline as to when cursive was taught. However, in your and my day we certainly would have known what it was even if we could not yet use it.

When I see my grandkids at Christmas I will ask my 14 year old granddaughter who is a straight A student if she can write her name. I highly doubt she can, and if she does the penmanship will probably be very poor.

Here in Wausau writing is not on the school curriculum at any age.

That was happening here in San Diego when I retired eleven and a half years ago. I don't even want to think about what it must be like now. Sad

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 12-01-2014, 08:20 PM
#15
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Well, I guess the kids, nowadays, must have fastest thumbs in the west! Biggrin

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