12-12-2014, 09:33 AM
#1
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
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I have a boar brush that I really like but it's sketched to look like three band badger. I have never understood why manufacturers choose to dye a band in the middle of boar bristles to make them resemble badger..

I do however love a bleached boar (all of my brushes except three are bleached boar) and I would love to bleach this one to do away with the band but I wonder if household bleach will destroy the bristles.

Any thoughts, experience, cautions or advice?

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 12-12-2014, 09:54 AM
#2
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Usually sketched boar fades a fair bit over time. I, like you, feel that aesthetics are a bit silly, but over time I've noticed a couple of things about those brushes:

-Usually people consider them to be a bit softer than unsketched varieties, and I have discovered a similar thing with both Omega and Semogue varieties

This got me thinking, one of the things which contributes to boar brushes feeling rougher is that sometimes the ends are "clipped" or perhaps even reversed. What if the sketching makes hand tying the knot easier by providing an easy marker for "this end up" during brush construction? Seems somewhat plausible.

So I don't have a quick fix for your issue, but the sketching will fade over time. In the mean time though, I have come to enjoy my sketched piggies face feel a bit more than the unsketched, but I agree the aesthetics are not so good.

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 12-12-2014, 10:05 AM
#3
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Mike, I would just buy another brush as boars are so inexpensive! Biggrin

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 12-12-2014, 10:24 AM
#4
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
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(12-12-2014, 09:54 AM)explodyii Wrote: Usually sketched boar fades a fair bit over time. I, like you, feel that aesthetics are a bit silly, but over time I've noticed a couple of things about those brushes:

-Usually people consider them to be a bit softer than unsketched varieties, and I have discovered a similar thing with both Omega and Semogue varieties

This got me thinking, one of the things which contributes to boar brushes feeling rougher is that sometimes the ends are "clipped" or perhaps even reversed. What if the sketching makes hand tying the knot easier by providing an easy marker for "this end up" during brush construction? Seems somewhat plausible.

So I don't have a quick fix for your issue, but the sketching will fade over time. In the mean time though, I have come to enjoy my sketched piggies face feel a bit more than the unsketched, but I agree the aesthetics are not so good.

Can't say this sample, is any softer than my other boars.. And I will bail on it long before it fades. I am close to pulling out the scissors...

(12-12-2014, 10:05 AM)celestino Wrote: Mike, I would just buy another brush as boars are so inexpensive! Biggrin

Certainly easy enough, right? However, this one is a little off the beaten path. It's an 1800 knot transplanted in a Rudy Vey resin done to mimic the 1305. I just bought it from Jeff (shanman). I love the handle and it's a keeper. Far easier to replace the knot. And not a big deal to do so, except I like the size. So if bleaching it works, it would be pretty cool.

I guess I should just bleach it. If it's a fail, I replace it. I was just curious if anyone has done it.

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 12-12-2014, 01:00 PM
#5
  • dajmacd
  • Member
  • Tennessee River Valley
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You could try dipping pre-soaked bristles in household hydrogen peroxide (3%, not the 30+% stuff) and putting them in the sun. You could also try lemon juice and sunshine or some of the Sun-In hair lightener as well.

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 12-12-2014, 01:14 PM
#6
  • Gordy
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I do not like sketched boars at all, but there are a lot of very nice handles out there that I'd love to see on bleached boar bristle.

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 12-12-2014, 01:50 PM
#7
  • MikekiM
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  • Long Island, NY
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(12-12-2014, 01:00 PM)dajmacd Wrote: You could try dipping pre-soaked bristles in household hydrogen peroxide (3%, not the 30+% stuff) and putting them in the sun. You could also try lemon juice and sunshine or some of the Sun-In hair lightener as well.

I tried regular bleach and though it seems to have stripped some gunk off, it did nothing for the dye. I will say, it lathers better now... Must have been some residue on it. I'll try the other options.

(12-12-2014, 01:14 PM)Gordy Wrote: I do not like sketched boars at all, but there are a lot of very nice handles out there that I'd love to see on bleached boar bristle.

It's been my quest, of late, to reknot those brushes I really like. I have all but abandoned badger. Bleached Semogue SoC is my favorite of all boar knots I have. I think I have four different handles with SoC knots.

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 12-12-2014, 06:08 PM
#8
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I also share your dislike of dyed boar. Fornunately, my favorite boars are the Semogue SOC and the Omega large knots, all of which are undyed.

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 12-12-2014, 08:59 PM
#9
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(12-12-2014, 01:50 PM)MikekiM Wrote: It's been my quest, of late, to reknot those brushes I really like. I have all but abandoned badger. Bleached Semogue SoC is my favorite of all boar knots I have. I think I have four different handles with SoC knots.


How come, Mike?

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 12-13-2014, 06:39 AM
#10
  • MikekiM
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  • Long Island, NY
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(12-12-2014, 08:59 PM)celestino Wrote:
(12-12-2014, 01:50 PM)MikekiM Wrote: It's been my quest, of late, to reknot those brushes I really like. I have all but abandoned badger. Bleached Semogue SoC is my favorite of all boar knots I have. I think I have four different handles with SoC knots.


How come, Mike?

Well... that's a good question and to be frank, I never really considered why I gravitated away from badger...

So.. my first brush was a very nice silvertip.. it was a custom from Pen Works that I bought from a member here. Over time I had a few really nice badgers.. Shavemac D01 two band, Rooney Heritage Stubby II, Semogue LE. All well made, dense and luxurious. I found that since I face lather and use hard soaps, 99.9% of the time, nearly all of the badgers lacked the backbone I wanted. And, though this may sound odd, they were often too luxurious. I mean, too soft and delicate on my Mediterranean, skin and beard.

My first bore was a Vulfix which I sold shortly after buying it because at that early stage of my BBAD (Boar Brush Acq Disorder) I didn't fully understand the process of breaking in a boar. As I learned the process I found it to be really enjoyable and frankly, I really look forward to the process and enjoy all the stages as the brush blossoms into its' own. And they are all different. I also like the way boar is uniquely different when dry than when wet and the 'day after', when it's half dry is when I most enjoy fondling the bristles.

There is also a bit of romance to it.. I have myself convinced that my great great grandfathers (none of whom where wealthy men) more than likely used the boar (probably horse hair too). The combination of straight razor and boar brush carries that romantic connection for me to how I suspect the gentleman of years gone by would have shaved and that's why it's what I choose.

I have about thirty brushes last count. Only three or four badgers remain. Two are Semogue LE's that carry #12 & #62; the month a year of my birth. I use them maybe once a year. I have a one-of-a-kind iKon travel brush only because I love early iKon stuff. And one TGN Super Badger that I retrofitted in a Hoffritz Beer Barrel handle I restored. The rest are Omega & Semogue. In that lot are about five Oscar11 handles (three more are coming) and a bunch of SoC knots with only one of those still in the original cherry handle. By far, my favorite boar is the SoC. I love the color, and the density. I really love how it looks and feels after a shave as well, and when it's half dry.. it's a wild crazy blonde. Its' break-in is a great experience and it's one of the faster boars when it comes to initial splitting and softening. I've found that setting the SoC a little lower than originally set makes it even better (this applies to Omega knots too).

That's my 'brain dump' on boars. None of the badger brushes I have had left me feeling like this, so.. I am a self admitted Boar-Whore!

HeartHeart

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 12-13-2014, 09:00 AM
#11
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(12-13-2014, 06:39 AM)MikekiM Wrote:
(12-12-2014, 08:59 PM)celestino Wrote:
(12-12-2014, 01:50 PM)MikekiM Wrote: It's been my quest, of late, to reknot those brushes I really like. I have all but abandoned badger. Bleached Semogue SoC is my favorite of all boar knots I have. I think I have four different handles with SoC knots.


How come, Mike?

Well... that's a good question and to be frank, I never really considered why I gravitated away from badger...

So.. my first brush was a very nice silvertip.. it was a custom from Pen Works that I bought from a member here. Over time I had a few really nice badgers.. Shavemac D01 two band, Rooney Heritage Stubby II, Semogue LE. All well made, dense and luxurious. I found that since I face lather and use hard soaps, 99.9% of the time, nearly all of the badgers lacked the backbone I wanted. And, though this may sound odd, they were often too luxurious. I mean, too soft and delicate on my Mediterranean, skin and beard.

My first bore was a Vulfix which I sold shortly after buying it because at that early stage of my BBAD (Boar Brush Acq Disorder) I didn't fully understand the process of breaking in a boar. As I learned the process I found it to be really enjoyable and frankly, I really look forward to the process and enjoy all the stages as the brush blossoms into its' own. And they are all different. I also like the way boar is uniquely different when dry than when wet and the 'day after', when it's half dry is when I most enjoy fondling the bristles.

There is also a bit of romance to it.. I have myself convinced that my great great grandfathers (none of whom where wealthy men) more than likely used the boar (probably horse hair too). The combination of straight razor and boar brush carries that romantic connection for me to how I suspect the gentleman of years gone by would have shaved and that's why it's what I choose.

I have about thirty brushes last count. Only three or four badgers remain. Two are Semogue LE's that carry #12 & #62; the month a year of my birth. I use them maybe once a year. I have a one-of-a-kind iKon travel brush only because I love early iKon stuff. And one TGN Super Badger that I retrofitted in a Hoffritz Beer Barrel handle I restored. The rest are Omega & Semogue. In that lot are about five Oscar11 handles (three more are coming) and a bunch of SoC knots with only one of those still in the original cherry handle. By far, my favorite boar is the SoC. I love the color, and the density. I really love how it looks and feels after a shave as well, and when it's half dry.. it's a wild crazy blonde. Its' break-in is a great experience and it's one of the faster boars when it comes to initial splitting and softening. I've found that setting the SoC a little lower than originally set makes it even better (this applies to Omega knots too).

That's my 'brain dump' on boars. None of the badger brushes I have had left me feeling like this, so.. I am a self admitted Boar-Whore!

HeartHeart

The entire thread is interesting. But I especially like the selected bit of text. Who can't relate to that!? I know it's a large factor in why I use vintage razors, so why not boar brushes?

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 12-13-2014, 10:09 AM
#12
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
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Truth told, I believe the reason I started to wet shave, first with DEs and now with straights, is largely because of the sentimental romance of the whole process. My life is largely dictated by technology, 'the immediate', the whiz bang that is the world we live in. Things become numbingly rote and often monotonous. Battery chargers, email, blue tooth, wireless this and LED that.. The connection to life in a simpler way has all but been severed. The business world (society in general) has decided that one must be clean shaven to be deemed trustworthy so shaving is a daily activity for me. What better way to reconnect with simpler times, when it was cool to be a 'gentleman', than by the daily shaving ritual.

The process is what's it's all about. The hand tooling of equipment. The maintenance of a straight razor. Whipping up lather each morning rather than pressing a button.

Whether or not our forefather preferred boar or badger will never be proven, but we do know they didn't have mass produced & disposable cartridge razors and canned too. Therein is what draws me to wet shaving and boar & straights in particular.


Sent from East of Montauk

We have taken a departure from my original question about sketching the boar, but in some ways the detour is appropriate. Shave a pig and the hair isn't sketched.. Technology has stepped in here too..


Sent from East of Montauk

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 12-13-2014, 10:29 AM
#13
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(12-12-2014, 10:05 AM)celestino Wrote: Mike, I would just buy another brush as boars are so inexpensive! Biggrin

+1

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 12-13-2014, 11:37 AM
#14
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Mike, thanks for your insights and I hope you keep enjoying your brushes! I guess we are in opposition as I just love Badger brushes and would only use boar if I had no other choice! They are just a bit too rough for my delicate face and I feel bad as the best ones are made in my country of origin, Portugal! Biggrin

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 12-17-2014, 01:52 AM
#15
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(12-12-2014, 06:08 PM)TheLegalRazor Wrote: I also share your dislike of dyed boar. Fornunately, my favorite boars are the Semogue SOC and the Omega large knots, all of which are undyed.

Me too
I like my Boars "clear".

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 12-18-2014, 08:06 AM
#16
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It may be harmful to the brush to expose it to any unnecessary chemical treatments. If you have any sentimental value placed on this brush in particular, I would suggest trying any such treatments on a brush you are not crazy about first.

A lot of people have been saying buy another, and while I tend to agree, I myself would be loathing the typical boar break-in period for a second time. I think thats one of the reasons why I was never big on boars in the first place.

Best of luck and let us know how it ends up going for you!

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