01-08-2015, 07:42 AM
#1
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I've been using an Aeropress for a while now and have been very happy with it compared to the French Press (better coffee + easy cleanup), but I hear a lot of coffee folks talk about this "pour over" stuff and want to give it a try.

So for basics - not necessarily top-of-the-line since I want to try it before investing in something you'd see in a Williams-Sonoma catalog - what's good equipment, what is the basic technique, the grind, etc.

Thank you kindly, sirs.

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 01-08-2015, 07:58 AM
#2
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
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 01-08-2015, 08:21 AM
#3
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Medium to coarse grind. All you need is a filter cone and filters. I've tried about all of them and my favorite is the Kalita Wave 185 stainless. On a budget just pick up a plastic Melitta.

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 01-08-2015, 08:31 AM
#4
  • Hanzo
  • Senior Member
  • Oakland, California
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(01-08-2015, 08:21 AM)guildx500 Wrote: Medium to coarse grind. All you need is a filter cone and filters. I've tried about all of them and my favorite is the Kalita Wave 185 stainless. On a budget just pick up a plastic Melitta.

I use the Melitta daily, they recommend and what works best is a very fine powdery grind.

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 01-08-2015, 12:08 PM
#5
  • Ram57
  • Senior Member
  • Boise, ID
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I us a Tiamo K02 stainless steel dripper which is a Kalita wave 185 knockoff at 2/3rd the price. I find what works best for my taste buds is a find grid like and expresso and I weigh my water and coffee. My brother in law who has a Kalita 185 got me started with pour over he tends to just eyeball the amount of water and coffee grinds which to me would not lead to a consistent cup of coffee.

Should add that my progression was from the Clever Coffee Drip then Aeropress and now the Tiamo K02 pour over system.

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 01-08-2015, 02:04 PM
#6
  • Giorgio
  • Senior Member
  • Pennsylvania, US
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I have the Clever Coffee drip and I use the same grind with it as I use on my Aeropress Biggrin

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 02-02-2015, 05:38 PM
#7
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Will the 2-4 cup pourovers work fine for just 1-2 cups? I usually only make coffee for myself but sometimes want a big cup Biggrin

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 02-02-2015, 06:25 PM
#8
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Forgive my ignorance. My coffee experience is based on my Mr Coffee, my Keurig, and my camping percolator (makes the best cup of all 3 lol). How does the pour over differ from a coffee maker other than no electricity? Looks like you just pour the hot water over the coffee and let it filter through or did I miss something?

I really am interested to know for I do love a good cup of coffee!

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 02-02-2015, 07:54 PM
#9
  • Giorgio
  • Senior Member
  • Pennsylvania, US
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Freddie, the simple answer to your question is more control. There are various pouring techniques out there for each type of pour over device (and yes, each one has its own unique qualities that requires a different technique). You control the temp and flow of water, how it immerses the grind, and for how long, etc....

For my Clever dripper, it is a little different because it has a valve at the bottom that defaults to close. Technique is much less of an issue with this one, as I just pour and let the water sit in the filter for as long as the type of bean dictates (to get the flavor I want from that particular bean), and when I'm ready it goes on top of my cup which opens the valve and amazing coffee fills it up. I liken the Clever to more of a French Press method with a paper filter than a true pour over.

The pour over is one of those techniques that coffee fanatics can use to adjust the flavor ever so slightly to their liking. Most regular coffee drinkers will barely notice (or care about) that slight difference. This method of brewing is just another tool for the obsessed Biggrin

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 02-03-2015, 02:25 AM
#10
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(02-02-2015, 07:54 PM)Giorgio Wrote: Freddie, the simple answer to your question is more control. There are various pouring techniques out there for each type of pour over device (and yes, each one has its own unique qualities that requires a different technique). You control the temp and flow of water, how it immerses the grind, and for how long, etc....

For my Clever dripper, it is a little different because it has a valve at the bottom that defaults to close. Technique is much less of an issue with this one, as I just pour and let the water sit in the filter for as long as the type of bean dictates (to get the flavor I want from that particular bean), and when I'm ready it goes on top of my cup which opens the valve and amazing coffee fills it up. I liken the Clever to more of a French Press method with a paper filter than a true pour over.

The pour over is one of those techniques that coffee fanatics can use to adjust the flavor ever so slightly to their liking. Most regular coffee drinkers will barely notice (or care about) that slight difference. This method of brewing is just another tool for the obsessed Biggrin

Giorgio,
Thank you for taking the time to educate me on that. Sounds interesting. I may have to look into that down the road since I only see myself having time to toy with one on the weekends and even thats pushing it lol.

Regards,
Freddie

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 02-03-2015, 06:22 AM
#11
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(02-02-2015, 06:25 PM)FreddieP318ti Wrote: Forgive my ignorance. My coffee experience is based on my Mr Coffee, my Keurig, and my camping percolator (makes the best cup of all 3 lol). How does the pour over differ from a coffee maker other than no electricity? Looks like you just pour the hot water over the coffee and let it filter through or did I miss something?

I really am interested to know for I do love a good cup of coffee!

I use two different pour-over methods.
1) Chemex. 
Chemex recommends a French-Press grind (course) I agree. The Chemex filters are thicker than the Melitta. 
Try this ratio: 48g coffee and 710g water, heated to 200˚. Pre-soak the Chemex filter (not necessary, but I feel that the filter absorbs LESS oil when it is wet). 
Pour approx. 150g of water over the beans and wait for 60-90 sec. (This allows the beans to de-gas)
Slowly pour the remainder water over the beans, making sure your pour slowly and direct the water flow in a circular motion all around the beans, to ensure complete coverage.

2) Melitta.
Coffee beans should be ground fine. This is the only difference in the preparation. 

The main advantage to a pour-over method vs. machine (with the exception of the Technivorm) is the flooding of the beans with water, rather than the spitting, dribbling of MOST electric coffee makers.  The second advantage is the ability to control EXACTLY the temperature of the water. Most recommend a water temperature of 195˚- 205˚. I have a Cuisinart electric kettle. I can choose my water temperature. There are a couple of good ones on the market. 

Hope this helps you enjoy your java. (Next up...home roasting Biggrin ) 

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 03-14-2015, 02:46 AM
#12
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I would recommend french press as the ultimate cup of coffee.  Use water that is just coming off boiling for about the perfect water temp.  Pour in slowly as you stir it with a chopstick.  fiddle with the timer till you get the brew  that you favor.  my setup is a 12 cup press, a 1 quarter cup of whole beans (before grinding) and 1/2 of a quarter measuring cup of beans.  In other words, I fill up a 1/4 measuring cup of beans and dump them in the grinder, then fill the 1/4 measuring cup again 1/2 way, and dump those beans in the grinder too.  Fill the press with the hot water just to above the metal band on my Bodum press, let it steep for 4.5 minutes, press and pour into a Nissan thermos.  Perfect every time.

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 03-17-2015, 07:00 PM
#13
  • Shanman
  • Reserve Collection Squirrel Hair
  • NE Florida
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I'm a Hario V60 guy. I pefer the cone pass through versus the flat bottom Kalita I own. I don't use plastic anything.
28g per 12oz water, Bonavita electric pour over kettle. Bodum conical burr grinder set to medium coarse.
Bloom for 30 seconds, then pour the rest in a circular pattern avoiding the filter walls until kettle empty.
Makes about three big cups of perfect coffee.

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 03-17-2015, 08:50 PM
#14
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
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I need to get my Clever Drip out and start using it again. I have been using mainly Aeropress but it is time to experiment a bit.

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 03-17-2015, 09:04 PM
#15
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Have never tried the pour over. I did recently discover thy Moka Pot...this thing kills regular drop coffee.[Image: 5d729d6f10a381bb17d82efb8d99bffc.jpg]

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 04-23-2015, 04:32 AM
#16
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I use Chemex, but I found out that regular #4 filters (mine is 8 cup) work just fine. For the ratio of coffee to water I use this resource:
https://www.blackbearcoffee.com/resources/83

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 04-23-2015, 05:51 AM
#17
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Partly based on this thread, I went out and bought one of those cheap Melitta pour over cones, some filters, and some ground coffee for use at work and its been great.  I try not to "fuss" it up too much; we have a hot water tap at our water source and it just takes about 2-3 minutes and the coffee is delicious.  I think all told, it cost about $18-$20 to get up and running.

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 04-23-2015, 07:30 AM
#18
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"Pour Over" is how I order it from the local Java Shop.

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