01-12-2015, 12:07 AM
#1
  • Teddyboy
  • Guilty, with an explanation
  • NYC
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Is it possible to determine from a soap's ingredient list whether or not it is a melt and pour soap, or simply a soap that has more than a tad of added glycerine?

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 01-12-2015, 06:33 AM
#2
  • sch1989
  • Senior Member
  • Mesa arizona
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I don't think you can melt and pour anything with tallow. I may be wrong there ?


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 01-12-2015, 09:13 AM
#3
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Sure, if the ingredient list is honest. A handmade cold or hot process soap may have additional glycerine added to it but that does not make it a melt-and-pour soap.

Some things that you might see on a melt-and-pour ingredient label that aren't used in hand-made soap: Propylene Glycol, Sorbitol, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Sodium Laurate, Wheat or soy Protein.

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 01-12-2015, 09:21 AM
#4
  • Agravic
  • Super Moderator
  • Pennsylvania, USA
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Thanks for the clarification, Michelle.

There seems to be some variability in terms of 'honest' disclosure of ingredients with certain soap makers/brands.

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 01-12-2015, 12:38 PM
#5
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(01-12-2015, 06:33 AM)sch1989 Wrote: I don't think you can melt and pour anything with tallow. I may be wrong there ?

Nope, you can make a melt-and-pour soap that contains tallow. I don't know of anywhere to buy that sort of base, though.

(01-12-2015, 09:13 AM)Mystic Water Wrote: Sure, if the ingredient list is honest. A handmade cold or hot process soap may have additional glycerine added to it but that does not make it a melt-and-pour soap.

Some things that you might see on a melt-and-pour ingredient label that aren't used in hand-made soap: Propylene Glycol, Sorbitol, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Sodium Laurate, Wheat or soy Protein.

This is a pretty reliable way to know that a soap has been made melt and pour. However, it is possible to make a melt and pour soap by hand. I don't know of any shaving soaps made this way, but it is possible. I suppose one could make a very large batch of soap, then scent & jar it later according to demand.

Another tell tale sign is that the soap is translucent. One of the major reasons that soapers make "melt and pour" soap themselves is because they want their soap to be clear. That's one of the major effects of the extra glycerin + solvent (propelyne glycol) aside from meltability..

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 01-12-2015, 02:14 PM
#6
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It is possible to make a translucent soap out of a regular handmade soap. If you made home-made "melt and pour" soap, then alcohol and sugar would be in the ingredient list, instead of sorbitol, propylene glycol, etc.

Some of the reasons people use melt and pour soap: it's easy, relatively inexpensive, you don't have to mess about with lye, children can do it with minimal supervision, and it gives fast results because there's no curing period. Originally melt and pour soap was clear, but in the last few years opaque versions are being sold that mimic the appearance of "regular" soap: goat milk melt and pour, shea butter melt and pour, etc. So transparency is not necessarily a tip-off anymore.

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 01-12-2015, 02:22 PM
#7
  • Teddyboy
  • Guilty, with an explanation
  • NYC
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(01-12-2015, 09:13 AM)Mystic Water Wrote: Sure, if the ingredient list is honest. A handmade cold or hot process soap may have additional glycerine added to it but that does not make it a melt-and-pour soap.

Some things that you might see on a melt-and-pour ingredient label that aren't used in hand-made soap: Propylene Glycol, Sorbitol, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Sodium Laurate, Wheat or soy Protein.

Very interesting. What if glycerine is listed first? Can tallow be included in melt and pour soap?

(01-12-2015, 12:38 PM)Songwind Wrote:
(01-12-2015, 06:33 AM)sch1989 Wrote: I don't think you can melt and pour anything with tallow. I may be wrong there ?

Nope, you can make a melt-and-pour soap that contains tallow. I don't know of anywhere to buy that sort of base, though.

(01-12-2015, 09:13 AM)Mystic Water Wrote: Sure, if the ingredient list is honest. A handmade cold or hot process soap may have additional glycerine added to it but that does not make it a melt-and-pour soap.

Some things that you might see on a melt-and-pour ingredient label that aren't used in hand-made soap: Propylene Glycol, Sorbitol, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Sodium Laurate, Wheat or soy Protein.

This is a pretty reliable way to know that a soap has been made melt and pour. However, it is possible to make a melt and pour soap by hand. I don't know of any shaving soaps made this way, but it is possible. I suppose one could make a very large batch of soap, then scent & jar it later according to demand.

Another tell tale sign is that the soap is translucent. One of the major reasons that soapers make "melt and pour" soap themselves is because they want their soap to be clear. That's one of the major effects of the extra glycerin + solvent (propelyne glycol) aside from meltability..

Very interesting and useful. Thank you.

(01-12-2015, 02:14 PM)Mystic Water Wrote: It is possible to make a translucent soap out of a regular handmade soap. If you made home-made "melt and pour" soap, then alcohol and sugar would be in the ingredient list, instead of sorbitol, propylene glycol, etc.

Some of the reasons people use melt and pour soap: it's easy, relatively inexpensive, you don't have to mess about with lye, children can do it with minimal supervision, and it gives fast results because there's no curing period. Originally melt and pour soap was clear, but in the last few years opaque versions are being sold that mimic the appearance of "regular" soap: goat milk melt and pour, shea butter melt and pour, etc. So transparency is not necessarily a tip-off anymore.

More interesting and useful info. This thread should be in a Wiki or other informative venue. I never expected it to be this instructive! Thanks Michelle and Eric.

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 01-12-2015, 05:47 PM
#8
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You can most definitely melt soaps that contain tallow. It's not nearly as easy as non tallow soaps and I'm sure the higher the tallow content the more difficult it becomes, but when someone tells you it's impossible......they are mistaken.


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