01-27-2015, 03:01 AM
#1
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
User Info
I am reliably informed (Simpson) to use a paint-brush stroke on my face when applying and working lather, and not a circular motion as this apparently twists the hairs thus shortening their lifespan. Sound familiar? Yes, I am sure we've heard this before. But the question is this: if you are bowl lathering...what then? Intriguing... or did Simpson only recommend face lathering? Smile When I bowl lather, I use a combination of both strokes. I find that a paint stroke motion during bowl lathering helps aerate. Perhaps I am simply imagining things.

0 1,769
Reply
 01-27-2015, 03:52 AM
#2
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
User Info
I never bowl lather, but I've wondered about the same tihing.  It strikes me that if circular lathering on your face will shorten the life of a knot, why wouldn't that apply to bowl lathering?  I regard these warnings from brush makers (Simpson are not the only ones) as purely exculpatory, i.e. protect thy posterior.  One of the brushes I have, a Thater I think, came with such a warning, stating that the bristles on one's face are very tough, so circular face lathering would put undue wear on the knot hair.

7 909
Reply
 01-27-2015, 05:40 AM
#3
  • tave
  • Mr whiskers
  • baltimore
User Info
Circular motions on your face can serve as an exfoliant and a good facial massage. I'll take my chances with knot damage and just enjoy the ride. Let Simpson and the like sweat the small stuff.

0 76
Reply
 01-27-2015, 05:49 AM
#4
User Info
This is the new hardware for bowl lathering.  New terminology maybe needed, dish lathering maybe?

[Image: L8yojV1.jpg]

13 246
Reply
 01-27-2015, 06:01 AM
#5
User Info
One of the reasons I use an $11 Omega boar is I can't stand thinking about what I should be doing to take care of the brush.  I just use it like I want, set down on its handle (bristles up), whatever I want.  

And, as Murphy's Law would have it, it's bulletproof.  Two years of daily use and no signs of wear.

0 303
Reply
 01-27-2015, 06:10 AM
#6
  • tave
  • Mr whiskers
  • baltimore
User Info
(01-27-2015, 05:49 AM)Sevenbark Wrote: This is the new hardware for bowl lathering.  New terminology maybe needed, dish lathering maybe?

[Image: L8yojV1.jpg]

Dish lathering!! Why not use Dawn detergent too. Our grandfathers will be turning in their graves.

0 76
Reply
 01-27-2015, 07:05 AM
#7
User Info
I've always wondered why brush manufacturers advise against circular motions. I understand their rationale is that it will reduce the lifespan of the brush but maybe it reduces it from 60 years to 50, in which case I'll "take my chances." Besides when I buy a brush I'm not really thinking about it out-lasting me. I'd rather use it the way I like and buy a new one sooner. At the very least it gives me an excuse to get a new one!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

84 1,505
Reply
 01-27-2015, 07:17 AM
#8
User Info
I've always read it is the grinding type motion (i.e., think of using a screwdriver) that is to be avoided.

If you bowl lather, it would be hard to avoid circular motions unless you had the lather trough shown above. Also, it would be rather difficult to build up lather from a soap because most are stored in round containers.

1 135
Reply
 01-27-2015, 07:26 AM
#9
User Info
I believe that they are talking more about "mashing" the brush while lathering.  I don't think that normal circular motions hurt much of anything.  It's the pressure they are most likely concerned about.  At least that's my feeling.

21 555
Reply
 01-27-2015, 07:45 AM
#10
  • Java
  • Active Member
  • Warner Robins, Georgia, USA
User Info
My two cents is that they are just covering their tails. Will avoiding circular strokes increase brush life? Sure. So would taking it out of the box and sealing it in a climate controlled display case, and never taking it out again. Like Face Bannon I have $11 Omegas that I've had for years, that only keep getting better. I don't abuse my brushes, but I don't really baby then either. The way I see it, a brush doesn't have to last 100 years, because I'd be surprised if I  last another 55.

0 272
Reply
 01-27-2015, 09:17 AM
#11
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
User Info
I worry most about going clockwise VS counterclockwise. A brush is a tool. Tools have a usefull life. If you wear one out with honest use and care- BUY ANOTHER one.
Didn't Simpson hear about the guy at the toothpaste company? " How can we sell more toothpaste? Sir, We could make the hole bigger in the tube."

2 3,171
Reply
 01-27-2015, 09:31 AM
#12
  • Barrylu
  • Senior Member
  • Portland OR
User Info
I stopped worrying about it after I bought my first Plisson. Plisson recommends a circular motion for lathering.  I use my Plissons for face lathering and my Simpson's for bowl lathering. With a little forethought and practice it is easy to train yourself to load and bowl lather a Simpson using a back and forth motion.

68 1,068
Reply
 01-27-2015, 10:19 AM
#13
User Info
Life is too short.  Just use that nice brush.  

Tips must break or fall out often.  I am not the easiest on my brushes and I have never had any trouble.  

2 58
Reply
 01-27-2015, 10:35 AM
#14
User Info
I have used bowls, scuttles, and face lathering using circular motions (soaps and creams) with boars and badgers for many, many years.  Not one "twisted hair" to date.

Ed

22 752
Reply
 01-27-2015, 10:53 AM
#15
User Info
If you never used circular motions, a badger brush would not even properly bloom with time.  I am sticking with it.

3 28
Reply
 01-27-2015, 11:01 AM
#16
  • Johnny
  • MODERATOR EMERITUS
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
User Info
Envision how you would scrub your back with a back brush in the shower. That's basically the way I apply lather to my face (using a lite brush stroke to smooth it out). I don't imagine they would approve of my way either. I've never had a brush go bad.

178 23,809
Reply
 01-27-2015, 11:12 AM
#17
User Info
gotta admit . that is something i don't worry about . i use it and if i need to get another one i will.

0 189
Reply
 01-27-2015, 11:21 AM
#18
User Info
Never even thought about it either.  I'm always living on the edge! Cool

0 33
Reply
 01-27-2015, 11:51 AM
#19
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
User Info
Dangerous-living bad boys, ha ha. I don't care too much myself about circular motion with a badger. 

0 1,769
Reply
 01-27-2015, 12:14 PM
#20
User Info
One thing that probably helps mine is I'm always combing them.  I use one, leave it out to dry for 24 hours.  Before I put it back in the cabinet, I always comb it out.  If any hairs were twisted, they'll untwist with some combing.

Don't even get me started with the crazy looks my wife gives me when I'm combing them out.  She once asked me if I had those little crazy hair troll dolls when I was a kid.  LOL  Nope, but I probably should have.  I could have refined my combing technique.

21 555
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)