01-27-2015, 07:11 AM
#1
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I'm on a quest to improve my print penmanship. Can anyone recommend a good font to emulate that has a little style, but that isn't full blown calligraphy? I would appreciate pictures and/or links so I can see some good fonts.

I found I don't care for italic print where you connect some letters together because it looks like a more structured form of cursive.

I'm not overly concerned about speed since I'm not taking notes on a daily basis. My writing is confined to shopping lists, an occasional letter, thank you notes, and I'm starting to incorporate it into weekly Bible scripture memorization just to give me a reason to write some more.

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 01-27-2015, 03:21 PM
#2
  • freddy
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  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Kyle, I'm not quite sure what you are looking for. I just use basic "ball and stick" printing when I write, as I was taught in elementary school some 60 years ago.

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 01-27-2015, 05:12 PM
#3
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(01-27-2015, 03:21 PM)freddy Wrote: Kyle, I'm not quite sure what you are looking for. I just use basic "ball and stick" printing when I write, as I was taught in elementary school some 60 years ago.

I'm looking for an image of a character set I can emulate.  I found this example of a Round font, but I'm thinking it tends more to the calligraphy side of writing rather than everyday printing.  Does that make sense?

[Image: call-alphs-rndhnd.gif]

I think this looks sharp, but I figure I would need a calligraphy style pen given all the thick and thin lines.

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 01-27-2015, 06:43 PM
#4
  • freddy
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  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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A proper calligraphy pen would be best, Kyle.  However, why not try a fountain pen with a stub nib.  I wrote this with a Nemoisine Singularity fountain pen with a .6 calligraphy nib (the name of the nib that Nemosine uses). Note the thinner cross lines in the upper case A and F, as well as on other letters.

[Image: CxrsvUv.jpg]

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 01-27-2015, 07:51 PM
#5
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Thanks Freddy!

I just have a Lamy Safari with a Medium Nib at the moment.

It looks like I'm at a bit of a crossroads. If I want the line variation I see on the Round font posted above, I need a different nib, which is basically taking me down the calligraphy path. If I just want something for everyday writing (using print versus cursive), I can stick with my Lamy medium nib, but I need to find a different font to emulate.

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 01-30-2015, 10:40 AM
#6
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I ordered a Pilot 78g with a broad italic nib, which seems like a good way to see if the 'flair' I'm looking for on my print characters is something I want to invest money and time to achieve. For now, I'm continuing to practice with my Lamy, and I can already see some improvement.

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 01-30-2015, 11:57 AM
#7
  • dajmacd
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  • Tennessee River Valley
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Check out identifont.com (look at the script fonts) and oldfonts.com.  They have images of complete character sets for the fonts they have.

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 01-30-2015, 01:32 PM
#8
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Thanks dajmacd! The oldfonts.com site seems like a great fit since it has some actual handwriting examples. I kind of like the Antiquarian Scribe map font. I don't know if I want to get that fancy, but it looks like it might be fun to mess around with and see what I can do with an italic nib.

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 01-30-2015, 02:37 PM
#9
  • dajmacd
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No problem, Kyle. Be sure and try the "Try It Out" feature on the website.  You can type strings of letters (A-M, N-Z, lowercase, numbers, etc) and get nice sets to practice from.  You can drag the generated image to your desktop and print it out.  The images do have very fine watermarking, but work fine as practice guides.

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 02-04-2015, 08:18 AM
#10
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(01-30-2015, 02:37 PM)dajmacd Wrote: No problem, Kyle. Be sure and try the "Try It Out" feature on the website.  You can type strings of letters (A-M, N-Z, lowercase, numbers, etc) and get nice sets to practice from.  You can drag the generated image to your desktop and print it out.  The images do have very fine watermarking, but work fine as practice guides.

Yep, that is what I did. I have a capital, lowercase, and number character set to emulate.

I picked up a Pilot 78g with broad italic nib, which really helps making the thin lines, flourishes, etc.

At this point, I think I may end up making a hybrid character set as each of the fonts I've looked at seem to have things I like, but also some things I don't.

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 02-04-2015, 02:27 PM
#11
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Good luck, Kyle! Just start printing and I am sure you will enjoy the end product as you improve and become more comfortable. Smile

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 02-11-2015, 08:52 AM
#12
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Things are going pretty well at this point.  

I had a big revelation last night after I changed the was I was writing with my Pilot 78g.  Before, I was using it at an slanted angle, but the broad italic nib wasn't working well to produce good line variation.  Then I changed to more of a flat angle after reading a Vintage Pen article on how to use a flex nib.  I was thinking of switching to a flex nib since the italic wasn't working well, but now I am happy with the results of simply changing the way I was writing.

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 02-11-2015, 11:26 PM
#13
  • freddy
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  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Kyle, that is a great article.  It's good to know that you are getting on so well. Thumbsup

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 02-13-2015, 07:45 AM
#14
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Turns out the flat angle I tried is not really for italic nibs.  I thought the line variation was good, but the pen was quite scratchy.

So, last night, I really focused on a more slanted angle (supposedly around 45 degrees is opitimal) and using a lighter touch on the pen.  This seemed to help for sure on the smoothness of the writing.

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 02-13-2015, 08:29 AM
#15
  • freddy
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  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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I hope you'll post a sample of your writing effort. Smile

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 02-18-2015, 08:25 PM
#16
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(02-13-2015, 08:29 AM)freddy Wrote: I hope you'll post a sample of your writing effort. Smile

OK, below is an example of when I started and a month later.  I still have a ways to go.  I'm still thinking about getting a flex nib pen to see if that is any better than the italic.  Additionally, I ordered an italic 1.1 nib for my Lamy Safari to see how that compares with the Pilot 78g.  

I should also note that I ditched the Palmer Method of Business Writing once I figured out it focused on cursive because I am wanting to focus on my printing at this time.

Pilot Varsity, default ink on Mead composition paper
[Image: rhynerson_kyle_first_specimen_01152015.jpg]

Pilot 78g broad italic nib, Noodler's 5 O'Clock Shadow on Rhodia paper
[Image: rhynerson_kyle_first_specimen_02172015.jpg]


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 02-18-2015, 09:31 PM
#17
  • freddy
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  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Wow, that's quite a difference in only one month!  Congratulations. Thumbsup

I was at the Los Angeles International Pen Show on Sunday (15 February) and flexible nib pens were definitely on a lot of people's minds.  I purchased two, a vintage Conklin (for which I paid way too much but it writes like a dream) and a new model that I haven't quite put through its paces, yet.

Although cursive rather than print, here is a sample using the vintage Conklin:

[Image: u1oWyvD.jpg]

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 02-24-2015, 03:33 PM
#18
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The writing sample looks good Freddy.  

Do you have pics of the pens?  

I ordered a vintage Wahl-Eversharp semi-flex from Peyton Street Pens this week.  I'm looking forward to trying it out!

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 02-24-2015, 09:28 PM
#19
  • freddy
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Kyle, I hope to have some photographs posted soon.  I have a guest staying with me right now but once she leaves I'll try to take some pictures.

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