02-03-2015, 08:57 AM
#1
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Any suggestions here? Purchased a lightly used brush and am wondering how to sanitize it, if i even need to. Thanks!

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 02-03-2015, 01:10 PM
#2
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I use my fiance's cosmetic brush cleaning solution made by MAC. Can't say how effective it is but it hasn't hurt my brushes.

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 02-04-2015, 01:03 AM
#3
  • mlzettl
  • Artisan
  • Morehead City, NC
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I would first wash the brush with Dawn (or equivalent) dish washing detergent and hot water. Rinse it well. This alone will remove most microorganisms. If you really want to sanitize it, then soak it for a few minutes in 130 degree F undiluted white vinegar. This will kill virtually all pathogens that might remain. After a good rinse, lather it a few times with your shave cream or soap of choice. Is all of this really necessary? From a practical standpoint, probably not, but then again we're not talking about some complicated and lengthy procedure either. Just my opinion.

Hope this helps.

Matt

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 02-04-2015, 05:59 AM
#4
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(02-03-2015, 01:10 PM)Shakamoto Wrote: I use my fiance's cosmetic brush cleaning solution made by MAC. Can't say how effective it is but it hasn't hurt my brushes.

I agree the MAC brush cleaner is great at getting out old soapy residue and cleaning shaving brushes, and in my opinion leaves my brush smelling far better than using vinegar and water (for me that scent remains for a long time, not even Tabac can make it go away Biggrin ).  Obviously you can't really sterilize a shaving brush with the methods we are talking about, rather we can sanitize our brushes.

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 02-04-2015, 11:14 AM
#5
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I've just done quite a few palm-lathers with the used brushes I have gotten, but if yours is quite congested with soap residue, a water/vinegar solution would work for a few minutes along with a shampooing, afterwards.

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 02-04-2015, 11:26 AM
#6
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(02-04-2015, 01:03 AM)mlzettl Wrote: I would first wash the brush with Dawn (or equivalent) dish washing detergent and hot water. Rinse it well. This alone will remove most microorganisms. If you really want to sanitize it, then soak it for a few minutes in 130 degree F undiluted white vinegar. This will kill virtually all pathogens that might remain. After a good rinse, lather it a few times with your shave cream or soap of choice.

Matt

I pretty much do this, but don't know the temp of my water.

Rinse, Dawn lather, soak in water, rinse, soak in vinegar and water solution, rinse, dawn lather, rinse....or something like that.

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 02-07-2015, 12:44 PM
#7
  • okok
  • Still smiling
  • Indianapolis
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Thanks guys - this is helpful.  Sounds like a reasonable plan.

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 02-07-2015, 01:15 PM
#8
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(02-04-2015, 01:03 AM)mlzettl Wrote: I would first wash the brush with Dawn (or equivalent) dish washing detergent and hot water. Rinse it well. This alone will remove most microorganisms. If you really want to sanitize it, then soak it for a few minutes in 130 degree F undiluted white vinegar. This will kill virtually all pathogens that might remain. After a good rinse, lather it a few times with your shave cream or soap of choice. Is all of this really necessary? From a practical standpoint, probably not, but then again we're not talking about some complicated and lengthy procedure either. Just my opinion.

Hope this helps.

Matt

The techniques listed above will most likely damage your brush.
1.) You do not want to use water that is too hot (if it's too hot for you to bathe in, it's too hot for the brush)
2.) Undiluted white vinegar is much too strong
What I like to do is take a measuring cup, fill it up with 7 ounces of warm water and 1 ounce of white vinegar. When soaking the brush, you should not allow the solution to go past 3/4 of the bristles, so you will likely have to dump some of the solution out. The reason why I say this is because Shaver Joe posted a thread on B&B where he showed white vinegar dissolving epoxy, which is what is used to keep the knot together and in the handle. After that I just rinse it thoroughly and it's good to go. 

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 02-07-2015, 02:22 PM
#9
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Of you don't mind losing the brush then use fire. It kills everything!

YMMV.

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 02-07-2015, 03:23 PM
#10
  • mlzettl
  • Artisan
  • Morehead City, NC
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(02-07-2015, 01:15 PM)NSmalls Wrote:
(02-04-2015, 01:03 AM)mlzettl Wrote: I would first wash the brush with Dawn (or equivalent) dish washing detergent and hot water. Rinse it well. This alone will remove most microorganisms. If you really want to sanitize it, then soak it for a few minutes in 130 degree F undiluted white vinegar. This will kill virtually all pathogens that might remain. After a good rinse, lather it a few times with your shave cream or soap of choice. Is all of this really necessary? From a practical standpoint, probably not, but then again we're not talking about some complicated and lengthy procedure either. Just my opinion.

Hope this helps.

Matt

The techniques listed above will most likely damage your brush.
1.) You do not want to use water that is too hot (if it's too hot for you to bathe in, it's too hot for the brush)
2.) Undiluted white vinegar is much too strong
What I like to do is take a measuring cup, fill it up with 7 ounces of warm water and 1 ounce of white vinegar. When soaking the brush, you should not allow the solution to go past 3/4 of the bristles, so you will likely have to dump some of the solution out. The reason why I say this is because Shaver Joe posted a thread on B&B where he showed white vinegar dissolving epoxy, which is what is used to keep the knot together and in the handle. After that I just rinse it thoroughly and it's good to go. 

Nick,

Thanks for that information. I was unaware that vinegar would dissolve epoxy. That information may come in handy at some point. The problem then arises that a dilute solution of vinegar, especially a 7:1 dilution in warm water is ineffective as a sanitizing agent. So, that again leaves us with simply washing the brush well with whatever shaving soap you prefer, and then rinsing it well. To be honest, that is all that I do. The OP asked about sanitizing, and that is different than cleaning. It may very well be that sanitizing with any of the readily available home sanitizing agents is not good for a badger brush. Another poster mentioned something about a brush cleaning product from MAC that is used for women's cosmetic brushes. Being unfamiliar with that product, I looked it up. The primary sanitizing agent in it is alcohol. Again, I don't know if this is good for a badger brush or not. As I said in my original post, from a practical standpoint, it is questionable in my mind whether anything other than thorough routine cleaning and rinsing after use is necessary at all.

Cheers,

Matt

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 02-07-2015, 06:07 PM
#11
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soak in water diluted white vinegar, then lather with dish soap or shampoo. shampoo and dish soap are interchangeable. I do the vinegar treatment alone every few months on all my brushes. It works really well to remove soap scum that builds up on the hairs

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 02-08-2015, 05:02 AM
#12
  • MPH
  • Member
  • UK
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Hi

What about a quick wash in the anti bacterial hand wash stuff you can buy everywhere (in UK at least)???? Say it kills 99% of bugglies.

As you may be able to tell I am not an expert in bacterial\ microbial stuff but surely it must do a better job than shampoo...and if its mild enough for children's hands maybe its OK for the hairs???

Any ideas????

Matt

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 02-08-2015, 06:51 AM
#13
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I use one spoon of borax substitute in a glass of warm water. I dip the brush in there and leave it for half an hour then rinse and dry. They're definitely clean after that but I'm not sure if Borax is a sanitiser as such.

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 02-23-2015, 02:25 PM
#14
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I use borax, I feel that is enough cleansing. Boar bristle comes from pigs, not the most sanitary animal I've ever seen, and based on the smell of some of the new boar brushes I question how much time was spent washing the hair before making into a brush. A cleaning with dish soap or a soak in borax is in my opinion enough to remove anything of concern.

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