02-04-2015, 03:08 PM
#1
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Has anyone else ever noticed that brand names from different time periods or different parts of the world smell differently, contain different ingredients & have different packaging. Brut for example:[Image: sGNnZzU.jpg]

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 02-04-2015, 03:32 PM
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The EDT & brushless shave cream aren't even available in the US. [Image: PYKyBWn.jpg][Image: zJpbJ6W.jpg]

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 02-04-2015, 03:57 PM
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  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(02-04-2015, 03:08 PM)captain caveman Wrote: Has anyone else ever noticed that brand names from different time periods or different parts of the world smell differently, contain different ingredients & have different packaging. Brut for example:

The brand names no longer function as a reliable designation of origin, which was the only basis of trademark rights under the Common Law (law deriving from English jurisprudence, which is the basic law in all of the United States except Louisiana).  Brut was created by Fabergé 50 years ago when Fabergé was its own firm, but subsequently household cleaners giant Lever Bros. (now Unilever, a Dutch firm) acquired Fabergé and then sold the rights to make and market Brut in some markets to Helen of Troy, a Bermuda corporation known for (among other products) Revlon and Dr. Scholls and OXO Good Grips and Vidal Sassoon hair curlers; Unilever retained the right to make and market Brut in other markets, however.  So you need to be a detective to know whether your bottle of Brut is a sister or brother of a Honeywell humidfier (Helen of Troy) or is a sister or brother of Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream (Unilever).  Which gives you more confidence?   Tongue

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 02-05-2015, 04:35 AM
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(02-04-2015, 03:57 PM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(02-04-2015, 03:08 PM)captain caveman Wrote: Has anyone else ever noticed that brand names from different time periods or different parts of the world smell differently, contain different ingredients & have different packaging. Brut for example:

The brand names no longer function as a reliable designation of origin, which was the only basis of trademark rights under the Common Law (law deriving from English jurisprudence, which is the basic law in all of the United States except Louisiana).  Brut was created by Fabergé 50 years ago when Fabergé was its own firm, but subsequently household cleaners giant Lever Bros. (now Unilever, a Dutch firm) acquired Fabergé and then sold the rights to make and market Brut in some markets to Helen of Troy, a Bermuda corporation known for (among other products) Revlon and Dr. Scholls and OXO Good Grips and Vidal Sassoon hair curlers; Unilever retained the right to make and market Brut in other markets, however.  So you need to be a detective to know whether your bottle of Brut is a sister or brother of a Honeywell humidfier (Helen of Troy) or is a sister or brother of Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream (Unilever).  Which gives you more confidence?   Tongue

Ive read about all of this. The same thing happened with the Old Spice brand. Ive personally found four totally different renditions of the classic Old Spice scent. I feel that I miss out on alot of good things that are only marketed in other countries as well. Sad  

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