02-16-2015, 05:56 AM
#1
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Does anyone have tips on how to clean and maintain a shaving brush on a regular basis?

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 02-16-2015, 06:05 AM
#2
  • celar36
  • Enjoying Life 1 shave at time
  • London, UK
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Rinse well after use so no soap will be left

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 02-16-2015, 06:52 AM
#3
  • jtmke
  • Ex shaving hater
  • milwaukee
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Just a rinse is what mine get. I may occasionally rub the handle for good luck (or clear unwanted residue)

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 02-16-2015, 06:58 AM
#4
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I do basically the same as others have mentioned above.  One additional thing I do if I notice a lot of soap build up near the handle is use some of my wife's MAC brush cleaning solution (made for cosmetic brushes).  It works really well, removes the soap gunk without the stink of vinegar. 

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 02-16-2015, 07:19 AM
#5
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I soak and rinse with warm water. As I presoak my boar brushes, they do not retain as much soap.
Also, I have a face wash dispenser sitting on my sink, if soap builds up and stiffens the brush, I use that, then some conditioner. Maybe  comb it through when dry

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 02-16-2015, 08:07 AM
#6
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I used to use vinegar on mine every so often.  It always took a while for the smell to go away.  I have since started using borax and hot water.  After soaking in that solution, all of the soap scum is gone and no vinegar smell.  Borax is cheap too, not as cheap as vinegar, but still cheap.

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 02-16-2015, 09:01 AM
#7
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As others have said, rinse well after each shave.

I have too many brushes in rotation to really build up soap/cream residue in them, but I have been using my boars brushes a lot these two months to break them in, and I use this solution to remove soap residue from them, it works perfectly:

1. Hand wash the brush in a shampoo with conditioner build in ( 2 in 1 ). Rinse it with water afterwards
2. Let the brush soak for 15-30 minutes in a cup with warm water and one teaspoon regular vinegar and a teaspoon of dishwasher soap. Rinse it with water afterwards.
3. Repeat step 1
4. Hand lather the brush with a shaving cream or shaving soap to bring out the scent of the vinegar. Let the brush sit for 10-15 minutes with the lather inside the brush.
5. Finally rinse the brush thoroughly in flushing warm water for 1-2 minutes

FINITO !!

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 02-16-2015, 11:59 AM
#8
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I get a drop of baby shampoo and let the brush soak.

Once it's soaked I lather up with baby shampoo water.

Rinse and it's done.

I found vinegar does very little, if anything once the baby shampoo has worked its magic.


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 02-16-2015, 01:12 PM
#9
  • Jovan
  • Banned
  • Traveling USA
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Once every other month (based on rotation) I soak the brush with some shampoo (mild no conditioner) then rinse thoroughly.  Then I take outside to air dry (living in California temperature is your friend in the winter) for the day.  By then the brush is ready for use.  Very easy and the brush feels and looks refresh and new.

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 02-16-2015, 02:39 PM
#10
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I think of what a badger, boar, or horse would do.

Just rinse and go.

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 02-16-2015, 03:03 PM
#11
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(02-16-2015, 02:39 PM)KnurledNut Wrote: I think of what a badger, boar, or horse would do.

Just rinse and go.
sounds reasonable at first - but the hairs in a shaving brush is dead, so perhaps not completely comparable?

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 02-16-2015, 03:10 PM
#12
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(02-16-2015, 02:39 PM)KnurledNut Wrote: I think of what a badger, boar, or horse would do.
Take a mud bath!

Not to get brittle, some skin fat, or in our case  shaving soap fat of any kind

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 02-16-2015, 03:44 PM
#13
  • mlzettl
  • Artisan
  • Morehead City, NC
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My personal opinion is that if a brush is rinsed very well after each use, it will need other maintenance/cleaning rarely, if ever. By rinsing well, I do not mean putting it under running water. If you have ever rinsed a paint brush loaded with water based paint under running water, you know how much water and how long it takes to get it really clean. Cleaning a brush used with a solvent based paint using the "3 can" technique is much more effective and efficient. Translating that technique to shaving brushes, what I do is to squeeze as much soap out of the brush as possible, then put about a quart or so of clean water in the sink. Swirl the brush around in the water for 10-20 seconds, squeeze and shake out the excess, drain the sink, and refill with another quart or so of water. Repeat the whole process for a total of about 3 rinses. If you mathematically figure out the dilution that is occurring with this technique vs. using the same total volume of water to rinse the brush once, either under the running faucet, or in the sink with 3 quarts of water in it, the degree of dilution is exponentially greater using the multiple rinses. It's a technique that I learned cleaning glassware when I took quantitative analysis many years ago (!) in college. It works. That is all I do with my brushes.

Matt

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 02-16-2015, 04:20 PM
#14
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(02-16-2015, 03:03 PM)tonsorius Wrote:
(02-16-2015, 02:39 PM)KnurledNut Wrote: I think of what a badger, boar, or horse would do.

Just rinse and go.
sounds reasonable at first - but the hairs in a shaving brush is dead, so perhaps not completely comparable?

Hair, itself, is dead. Only the follicle is live.

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 02-16-2015, 09:46 PM
#15
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A good rinse under warmer water and towel dry; haven't had an issue in four years. 

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 02-16-2015, 09:56 PM
#16
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I've only performed a brush cleaning after purchasing two second hand brushes. 
Normally I just rinse them after each use and forget about it.  

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 02-18-2015, 05:09 PM
#17
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I have used the shampoo and conditioner method a few times with good sucess, I have also used vinegar in the past. Claus gave a great example above witch I will probably follow next time.

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 02-20-2015, 11:35 AM
#18
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I notice two interesting things...

First, Boars need quite a bit more drying time, so be sure to leave them to dry thoroughly.  Second thing is that TOBS seems to leave a little bit of residue even when well rinsed.  I wash mine about once a month with mild dish soap.

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 02-20-2015, 12:10 PM
#19
  • Mr_Smartepants
  • Senior Member
  • Cambridgeshire, UK (CONUS post address)
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White vinegar is good for removing limescale deposits in hard-water areas.  Where I live we have ridiculously-hard water, so I have to clean my brushes about twice a year.
1) Diluted vinegar solution 5-1.  Soak the bristles, NOT the knot, agitate the bristles continuously. (no longer than 10 min)
2) Rinse well.
3) Palm lather baby shampoo.
4) Rinse well and soak knot in fresh water.
5) Shake well, strop on dry towel and dry thoroughly.

**Edit
Lately I've been using a Borax/hot-water solution (1 Tsp Borax, 8 oz hot water) and it clears out the limescale buildup quite nicely.  You can tell when you've got limescale buildup when you fluff/fan the dry brush and a powdery dust floats out into the air.

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 02-20-2015, 12:39 PM
#20
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After every shave I use this

http://www.hblythco.com/kernseife-brush-...n/dp/12191

Run my brush under warm running water cleaning out the lather from my shave. Just 3-4 swirls on the cleaning soap and a quick 5 second go in a bowl. Rest the brush on its bumb so it works into the knot. Clean my razor pop my software away and then rinse my brush. Hair is soft, tangle free and resilient. Haven't seen any hard water in my brushes for ages


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