02-25-2015, 02:19 PM
#1
  • HarryO
  • Active Member
  • FLA, USA.
User Info
I have been shaving for over 55 years. Since I have retired I shave only 2x per week.
About 8 mos ago I went from a Shick Hydro 5 to completely wet shaving.
I shave after my shower, use a heated cloth on my face for a few mins. I use Prorasso pre shave cream. Then I use one of my shaving soaps.
The razors I use primarily , Feather DS2. Nice razor but I cannot get a close shave. I currently average 4 passes. The last 2 passes are against the grain. Todays shave consisted the Feather and a new Derby Extra Razor blade. It felt as though the first 2 passes took only a min of whisker off.
After 2 passes against the grain I got a pretty close shave but also got 3 small nicks, not good. I finish off the shave with Tend Skin roll on. Been using this product for several years on and off with good results.

At the start of this journey I thought I had a rough beard. Now I don’t think so. I have a light colored beard and I am fair skin (sensitive skin). One time I used a Feather Blade and my face looked pretty bad. As well as the Kai blade same neg results.  Now I am thinking that my beard is light to med. My other razors are the Merkur long handle, Jagger 89lbl, and a Toro Mastiff  and a Muhler 89? which I think is too aggressive for me.
Any suggestions on what i am doing wrong, and possible other combinations I should try?
Thanks. HarryO

21 472
Reply
 02-25-2015, 02:29 PM
#2
  • chazt
  • Senior Member
  • Bayside, NY
User Info
Hi Harry, you'll probably get a ton of good advice from senior members. These guys and gals are great sources of solid info.

My advice would be to try some different blades. I like Crystals, Personna Med Preps and Gillette Silver Blues. They're all different on my face, but I get fine shaves from all of them.

One of the expressions I've seen since being a member here is "don't chase the baby." I interpret that as, "let the shave find it's way to you."

Good luck. It'll work out for you. I'm sure of it.

7 2,357
Reply
 02-25-2015, 02:31 PM
#3
  • blzrfn
  • Butterscotch Bandit
  • Vancouver USA
User Info
You don't mention anything about lather so I will assume you are good there.  The first thing I would recommend would be to get a razor blade sampler.  Those Derbys are very polarizing and many (myself included) feel they are not the smoothest blade on the planet.  I really like Polsilver blades, but experiences will vary with the razor, blade and user combination.  Another thing to consider would be that since you are using such a mild razor are you trying to compensate by using pressure?  This is a big no-no and you would be better suited to moving to a slightly more aggressive razor, such as your Jagger or Merkur, and maintaining very light pressure and letting the blade do its job.

148 2,821
Reply
 02-25-2015, 04:56 PM
#4
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
User Info
(02-25-2015, 02:19 PM)HarryO Wrote: About 8 mos ago I went from a Shick Hydro 5 to completely wet shaving.

The razors I use primarily , Feather DS2. Nice razor but I cannot get a close shave.

My other razors are the Merkur long handle, Jagger 89lbl, and a Toro Mastiff  and a Muhler 89 -- which I think is too aggressive for me.

1  I do not understand the first sentence quoted above.  Wet shaving has to do with prep, and if you do the the same prep with your Schick Hydro that you now do with DE razors, then you are wet shaving, period.

2.  Aside from that, a razor is a tool, and when one starts to use any new tool, it is best to devote some time and effort to learn how to use the tool before flitting to another tool.  (Excepting, of course, if you are tearing your face apart and want to stop the bleeding.)   In eight months, trying five different razors, especially trying a variety of blades in the different razors, you have not had a sufficient chance really to learn any one of the razors, and certainly have had no time to get acquainted with the combinations.  Good science suggests that you work with one variable at a time.  

The Feather AS-DS2 is an excellent instrument, and -- yes -- it has a deserved reputation as a mild razor, but if you work on technique, learn the proper angle and pressure, etc. it is capable of giving you a close shave when fitted with a sharp blade. Sharp blades deserve some respect and caution, but the Kai blades, certainly, are not rough, and most uers of the Feather blades do not regard them as rough when new, just as dangerously sharp.   Either the Kai or the Feather should make a fine match for the AS-D2, and, being inherently mild, the AS-D2 should be a fine learnng tool.

So, from one curmudgonly codger (born 1942) to another, my curmudgeonly suggestion is to put the Merkur, the Jagger, the Toro, and the Mühle razors on the shelf for the time being, and work exclusively with the Feather AS-D2 loaded with only one brand of blade -- Feather or Kai -- until you are absolutely certain in your own mind that you have completely mastered that combination.  Give your exclusive devotion to mastering that one trick for a minimum of a couple of months.  Only then, and not before, try experimenting with other blades, other razors, and other razor+blade combinations. 

My $0.02.

1 1,109
Reply
 02-25-2015, 05:32 PM
#5
User Info
(02-25-2015, 04:56 PM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(02-25-2015, 02:19 PM)HarryO Wrote: About 8 mos ago I went from a Shick Hydro 5 to completely wet shaving.

The razors I use primarily , Feather DS2. Nice razor but I cannot get a close shave.

My other razors are the Merkur long handle, Jagger 89lbl, and a Toro Mastiff  and a Muhler 89 -- which I think is too aggressive for me.

1  I do not understand the first sentence quoted above.  Wet shaving has to do with prep, and if you do the the same prep with your Schick Hydro that you now do with DE razors, then you are wet shaving, period.

2.  Aside from that, a razor is a tool, and when one starts to use any new tool, it is best to devote some time and effort to learn how to use the tool before flitting to another tool.  (Excepting, of course, if you are tearing your face apart and want to stop the bleeding.)   In eight months, trying five different razors, especially trying a variety of blades in the different razors, you have not had a sufficient chance really to learn any one of the razors, and certainly have had no time to get acquainted with the combinations.  Good science suggests that you work with one variable at a time.  

The Feather AS-DS2 is an excellent instrument, and -- yes -- it has a deserved reputation as a mild razor, but if you work on technique, learn the proper angle and pressure, etc. it is capable of giving you a close shave when fitted with a sharp blade. Sharp blades deserve some respect and caution, but the Kai blades, certainly, are not rough, and most uers of the Feather blades do not regard them as rough when new, just as dangerously sharp.   Either the Kai or the Feather should make a fine match for the AS-D2, and, being inherently mild, the AS-D2 should be a fine learnng tool.

So, from one curmudgonly codger (born 1942) to another, my curmudgeonly suggestion is to put the Merkur, the Jagger, the Toro, and the Mühle razors on the shelf for the time being, and work exclusively with the Feather AS-D2 loaded with only one brand of blade -- Feather or Kai -- until you are absolutely certain in your own mind that you have completely mastered that combination.  Give your exclusive devotion to mastering that one trick for a minimum of a couple of months.  Only then, and not before, try experimenting with other blades, other razors, and other razor+blade combinations. 

My $0.02.

Nicely stated Mel S Meles! I agree wholeheartedly that too often we shavers are too quick to assume that if we get the latest gadget that it will magically transform our shaves from average to flawless.  The truth of the matter is that simply learning good technique is perhaps the greatest thing we can give ourselves.  It takes patience, practice and the use of a limited set of tools as Mel suggests. 
My own battle with the ASD2 was finally won and I got it to perform for me but like you I found that it required too many passes to get the level of smoothness I wanted to so I sold it to fund other purchases including more efficient razors.

75 2,319
Reply
 02-25-2015, 06:33 PM
#6
  • HarryO
  • Active Member
  • FLA, USA.
User Info
(02-25-2015, 04:56 PM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(02-25-2015, 02:19 PM)HarryO Thanks for the input. I hate to say this but I am pretty compulsive and have kept a shaving log of my experiences with various razors and blades so not to get to confused (which is easy for me). I will take your suggestion and keep with the Feather DS2 and try the Feather blade with them. Thanks Wrote: About 8 mos ago I went from a Shick Hydro 5 to completely wet shaving.

The razors I use primarily , Feather DS2. Nice razor but I cannot get a close shave.

My other razors are the Merkur long handle, Jagger 89lbl, and a Toro Mastiff  and a Muhler 89 -- which I think is too aggressive for me.

1  I do not understand the first sentence quoted above.  Wet shaving has to do with prep, and if you do the the same prep with your Schick Hydro that you now do with DE razors, then you are wet shaving, period.

2.  Aside from that, a razor is a tool, and when one starts to use any new tool, it is best to devote some time and effort to learn how to use the tool before flitting to another tool.  (Excepting, of course, if you are tearing your face apart and want to stop the bleeding.)   In eight months, trying five different razors, especially trying a variety of blades in the different razors, you have not had a sufficient chance really to learn any one of the razors, and certainly have had no time to get acquainted with the combinations.  Good science suggests that you work with one variable at a time.  

The Feather AS-DS2 is an excellent instrument, and -- yes -- it has a deserved reputation as a mild razor, but if you work on technique, learn the proper angle and pressure, etc. it is capable of giving you a close shave when fitted with a sharp blade. Sharp blades deserve some respect and caution, but the Kai blades, certainly, are not rough, and most uers of the Feather blades do not regard them as rough when new, just as dangerously sharp.   Either the Kai or the Feather should make a fine match for the AS-D2, and, being inherently mild, the AS-D2 should be a fine learnng tool.

So, from one curmudgonly codger (born 1942) to another, my curmudgeonly suggestion is to put the Merkur, the Jagger, the Toro, and the Mühle razors on the shelf for the time being, and work exclusively with the Feather AS-D2 loaded with only one brand of blade -- Feather or Kai -- until you are absolutely certain in your own mind that you have completely mastered that combination.  Give your exclusive devotion to mastering that one trick for a minimum of a couple of months.  Only then, and not before, try experimenting with other blades, other razors, and other razor+blade combinations. 

My $0.02.

21 472
Reply
 02-25-2015, 06:35 PM
#7
  • HarryO
  • Active Member
  • FLA, USA.
User Info
(02-25-2015, 02:29 PM)chazt Wrote: Hi Harry, you'll probably get a ton of good advice from senior members. These guys and gals are great sources of solid info.

My advice would be to try some different blades. I like Crystals, Personna Med Preps and Gillette Silver Blues. They're all different on my face, but I get fine shaves from all of them.

One of the expressions I've seen since being a member here is "don't chase the baby." I interpret that as, "let the shave find it's way to you."

Good luck. It'll work out for you. I'm sure of it.

Thanks for your response and suggestions.

21 472
Reply
 02-25-2015, 07:07 PM
#8
User Info
I can't disagree with any advice from above. You do need to work with as few variables as possible to isolate the problem. When you're starting out, variables include pressure and and angle, in addition to the blade and razor. So, I would stick with a combination for a while and work on the other two of the aforementioned variables - pressure and angle. Getting the angle wrong will either mess up your face, or won't allow you to get a close shave, depending on if your angle is too steep, or too shallow. To keep the angle right is more difficult on some parts of your face than others. If you get the angle wrong, you may try to compensate with pressure, which will also cause you problems.

Good luck, and let us know how it goes.

0 1,097
Reply
 02-25-2015, 08:00 PM
#9
User Info
Go back to the Muhle R89 and stay with it until you have mastered the shave you want.  If it's too aggressive right now, only do one WTG pass and then one XTG pass.  Time, patience and repetition cures all ills.

9 1,208
Reply
 02-25-2015, 08:04 PM
#10
User Info
Good advice so far.

Since you come to blade shaving from cart's concentrate on using NO PRESSURE. Cart's require pressure to work, blades require the opposite. When you think you're using no pressure reduce it by half. Then again by half. The pressure required is just enough to keep the blade from skipping over the skin. If you see the skin being depressed by the razor you're using too much.

The other thing I would work on is lather. Lather making is a critical skill, but it's not difficult to learn. I like mine to be so fine "grained" that it's almost iridescent. Too, it should be hydrated enough to last for at least one pass. Practice making lather; seriously. When I was learning I would hand lather soap, then spread it on my arm. It should be hydrated enough to last for at least 5 minutes, or one pass, without drying out. Longer is a plus. When making lather be sure to deliberately over hydrate it. It will get foamy with large bubbles and then break down completely. Neither of those conditions yield lather useable for shaving, but you need to recognize them. The best thing to do if you make lather like that is to just rinse it and begin again.

Good advice on reducing variables. Change nothing until you get basic technique down. Don't be fast to change things up. You need to crawl before you can walk, and walk before you can run. You'll get there, and the fastest way is to do it slowly. It may sound strange but it's true.

32 6,470
Reply
 02-25-2015, 08:14 PM
#11
User Info
Best of luck and you may want to consider using a more moderate DE razor until your technique improves, then you can revisit the Feather AS-D2. Good luck.  Smile

83 21,109
Reply
 02-25-2015, 10:39 PM
#12
User Info
The 89 is pretty mild. I'd try different blades as Derbys are one of my least favorite. Be sure that you understand your hair grain as it is different for everyone. Stick with with grain and cross grain passes only for a while until you develop your technique. Also it sounds like you were getting satisfactory results with the Schick before and you might want revisit it to see that your prep and lather is up to snuff.

15 771
Reply
 02-26-2015, 06:45 AM
#13
  • clint64
  • Senior Member
  • Atlanta, GA
User Info
The advise given above is very good.  The thing that helped me most with my technique was to settle on one razor and blade combo that worked reasonably well.  Then keep all the other variables the same so that I could concentrate on improving my technique.  I was pleasantly surprised when everything just clicked and consistently good results were the norm .  Good luck and keep us posted of your progress.

Clint

7 1,278
Reply
 02-26-2015, 02:59 PM
#14
  • HarryO
  • Active Member
  • FLA, USA.
User Info
(02-26-2015, 06:45 AM)clint64 Wrote: The advise given above is very good.  The thing that helped me most with my technique was to settle on one razor and blade combo that worked reasonably well.  Then keep all the other variables the same so that I could concentrate on improving my technique.  I was pleasantly surprised when everything just clicked and consistently good results were the norm .  Good luck and keep us posted of your progress.

Clint
Thanks Clint will take your advice.

21 472
Reply
 02-26-2015, 03:00 PM
#15
  • HarryO
  • Active Member
  • FLA, USA.
User Info
(02-25-2015, 08:04 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Good advice so far.

Since you come to blade shaving from cart's concentrate on using NO PRESSURE. Cart's require pressure to work, blades require the opposite. When you think you're using no pressure reduce it by half. Then again by half. The pressure required is just enough to keep the blade from skipping over the skin. If you see the skin being depressed by the razor you're using too much.

The other thing I would work on is lather. Lather making is a critical skill, but it's not difficult to learn. I like mine to be so fine "grained" that it's almost iridescent. Too, it should be hydrated enough to last for at least one pass. Practice making lather; seriously. When I was learning I would hand lather soap, then spread it on my arm. It should be hydrated enough to last for at least 5 minutes, or one pass, without drying out. Longer is a plus. When making lather be sure to deliberately over hydrate it. It will get foamy with large bubbles and then break down completely. Neither of those conditions yield lather useable for shaving, but you need to recognize them. The best thing to do if you make lather like that is to just rinse it and begin again.

Good advice on reducing variables. Change nothing until you get basic technique down. Don't be fast to change things up. You need to crawl before you can walk, and walk before you can run. You'll get there, and the fastest way is to do it slowly. It may sound strange but it's true.

Thanks for your response. Will take up your suggestions. H

21 472
Reply
 02-26-2015, 03:03 PM
#16
  • HarryO
  • Active Member
  • FLA, USA.
User Info
(02-25-2015, 08:04 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: Good advice so far.

Since you come to blade shaving from cart's concentrate on using NO PRESSURE. Cart's require pressure to work, blades require the opposite. When you think you're using no pressure reduce it by half. Then again by half. The pressure required is just enough to keep the blade from skipping over the skin. If you see the skin being depressed by the razor you're using too much.

The other thing I would work on is lather. Lather making is a critical skill, but it's not difficult to learn. I like mine to be so fine "grained" that it's almost iridescent. Too, it should be hydrated enough to last for at least one pass. Practice making lather; seriously. When I was learning I would hand lather soap, then spread it on my arm. It should be hydrated enough to last for at least 5 minutes, or one pass, without drying out. Longer is a plus. When making lather be sure to deliberately over hydrate it. It will get foamy with large bubbles and then break down completely. Neither of those conditions yield lather useable for shaving, but you need to recognize them. The best thing to do if you make lather like that is to just rinse it and begin again.

Good advice on reducing variables. Change nothing until you get basic technique down. Don't be fast to change things up. You need to crawl before you can walk, and walk before you can run. You'll get there, and the fastest way is to do it slowly. It may sound strange but it's true.
Thanks for the info. I think the consensus is go slow and reduce the variables. Thanks Harry

21 472
Reply
 02-26-2015, 09:32 PM
#17
User Info
Great advise and I can only agree.

Another thing you might want to look at (from somebody who does have a coarse beard with sensitive skin) is your pre-shave routine. I cannot shave after a hot shower, my skin is puffed up and it  will result in many nicks. So for me your routine of hot shower and hot towel would be absolute overkill. Maybe drop one? I would drop the shower, as it is easier to control the time, temperature etc. of the hot towel.

Just change only one variable at the time.

7 928
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)