03-01-2015, 01:36 PM
#1
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Hi

There ist still some contradiction going on between pricepoint, everyman´s brush  and long longue time/ high effort to making a boar brush work.

Soaking it thoroughly and then  working the wet tips on  a piece of rubber, say for 10 minutes for starters does a great job of literally breaking up the tips and making the tips as soft as you want.





This is an idea I read about here, mentioned by Brian Krampert; http://shavenook.com/thread-to-boar-fans...hem?page=2


Quote:When I was breaking in boar brushes I could regularly break them in within a week by lathering them 3 times a day. I know someone else who does it all in one sitting. He wets the brush then "lathers" it on a piece of rubber sheet (water only) while watching the talking heads. In 30 minutes they're broken in.

My pretty much broken in boars still were improved significantly in softness and facefeel by  this mechanical break in.

Finally I managed to break in some hair Wink
Philipp

p.p.s. reading the post below, mine eat lather too, but I can get the tips split and soft, which is a vast difference. Let´s do this one thing at a time

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 03-01-2015, 01:57 PM
#2
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I've not tried on rubber I have used one of those plastic tupperware containers and lathered through a whole episode of the Outer Limits (40minutes). I might think the grippy rubber might help split the tips? I've Also done about a week of face lathers. It is still far from done. I can only see a few bristles split on the outer edges. The brush (Semogue 830) is terrible and can barely hold enough lather for one pass. I have to load significantly longer than on a silvertip and a Plisson synth. The lather is quite thin especially on the chin. I hope all this effort is worth it.

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 03-01-2015, 02:00 PM
#3
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The original rubber sheet break in is on this forum I believe and it was posted by username brothers. Let me see if I can find it. If I can I'll edit this post to add it.

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 03-01-2015, 02:05 PM
#4
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(03-01-2015, 02:00 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: The original rubber sheet break in is on this forum I believe and it was posted by username brothers. Let me see if I can find it. If I can I'll edit this post to add it.

I know for a fact that it's on this forum, but the search function won't return results. Maybe I don't know how to use it.

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 03-01-2015, 02:40 PM
#5
  • Agravic
  • Super Moderator
  • Pennsylvania, USA
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Brian .. search functionality here leaves much to be desired.

Here's what I found ..

http://shavenook.com/thread-no-nonsense-...h-break-in

http://shavenook.com/thread-a-beginner-s...ving-brush

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 03-01-2015, 03:02 PM
#6
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Thanks Ravi!

The first link is what I referred to in both Bibblemanns post and mine.

FWIW, I have not used the rubber sheet method; I just filed it away in the grey matter.

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 03-01-2015, 03:07 PM
#7
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(03-01-2015, 01:57 PM)fram773 Wrote: I've plastic tupperware containers and lathered through a whole episode of the Outer Limits (40minutes). I might think the grippy rubber might help split the tips? I've Also done about a week of face lathers. It is still far from done. I can only see a few bristles split on the outer edges. The brush (Semogue 830) is terrible and can barely hold enough lather for one pass. I have to load significantly longer than on a silvertip and a Plisson synth. The lather is quite thin especially on the chin. I hope all this effort is worth it.

i use grippy rubber as used inside mechanix tool chests and let the brush soak quite some time before.  Not much splicing to be seen here either but much softer tips.

load it like you hate it,  because then you ll love it  Wink
break it in thoroughly, I d say along those lines.

What concerns the substantial soap eating, I just finished a test lather with two brushes 10 min ago with practically no soaking time. It did help!

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 03-01-2015, 06:31 PM
#8
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Thanks guys, I still own my 1305, 620 and 830 and will try this trick on them to break them in fast without having to pause using my beloved badgers - THANKS A MILLION !!!!

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 03-01-2015, 08:41 PM
#9
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Good luck, Claus!  Biggrin

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 03-03-2015, 06:42 AM
#10
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interesting idea!

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 03-03-2015, 07:21 AM
#11
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(03-01-2015, 01:57 PM)fram773 Wrote: I've not tried on rubber I have used one of those plastic tupperware containers and lathered through a whole episode of the Outer Limits (40minutes). I might think the grippy rubber might help split the tips? I've Also done about a week of face lathers. It is still far from done. I can only see a few bristles split on the outer edges. The brush (Semogue 830) is terrible and can barely hold enough lather for one pass. I have to load significantly longer than on a silvertip and a Plisson synth. The lather is quite thin especially on the chin. I hope all this effort is worth it.
Which episode?

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 03-03-2015, 08:11 AM
#12
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(03-03-2015, 07:21 AM)primotenore Wrote:
(03-01-2015, 01:57 PM)fram773 Wrote: I've not tried on rubber I have used one of those plastic tupperware containers and lathered through a whole episode of the Outer Limits (40minutes). I might think the grippy rubber might help split the tips? I've Also done about a week of face lathers. It is still far from done. I can only see a few bristles split on the outer edges. The brush (Semogue 830) is terrible and can barely hold enough lather for one pass. I have to load significantly longer than on a silvertip and a Plisson synth. The lather is quite thin especially on the chin. I hope all this effort is worth it.

Which episode?

Don't remember but I highly recommend The Stream. I can easily see that happening in real life someday.

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 03-03-2015, 08:11 AM
#13
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I have always just broken in a new boar brush by using it. The idea of being able to break one in more quickly is great, though. I read a post somewhere about using a ceramic bowl or small dish made to grate ginger root. I see them offered for sale in Asian markets -- even found one on Amazon.

[Image: BkHBBKa.jpg]

I guess the rows of dots are abrasive, and will (theoretically) split the ends of the boar bristles. Has anybody tried this?
Euro

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 03-03-2015, 09:56 AM
#14
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I would think the friction of the rubber would be less damaging overall to the bristles vs. the slicing of a grater. JMO

That was my first thought when I began reading this thread.

My second and current is now I can pick up a few new boar brushes and break them in really quickly!  

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 03-03-2015, 11:02 AM
#15
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The friction (drag) by rubber I would  prefer to a rough and hard surface,
as the latter may damage and cut off the fiber tips.
 If you try it, let us know, please! 
Philipp

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 03-04-2015, 01:31 AM
#16
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I someone wants to make shorter the break-in period can use a comb
Also can make lather to a tray who has cork.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-GAK5abBSpMA/UP...283%29.JPG

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-gixXauBwuC0/UP...t-+(4).JPG

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 03-04-2015, 02:34 PM
#17
  • Crag
  • Senior Member
  • Menifee, Ca 92586
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I always liked just breaking in the brush the old fashioned way...I never noticed much difference between face lathering and other forms of breaking in, and I always enjoyed the journey to breaking in a brush.  Be that as it may, I was always tempted to break them in a different way, but just never followed through, since there was little proof that it was 'tried-and-true'...

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 03-06-2015, 10:53 AM
#18
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(03-04-2015, 02:34 PM)Crag Wrote: I always liked just breaking in the brush the old fashioned way...I never noticed much difference between face lathering and other forms of breaking in, and I always enjoyed the journey to breaking in a brush.  Be that as it may, I was always tempted to break them in a different way, but just never followed through, since there was little proof that it was 'tried-and-true'...

+1
I haven't found a boar brush that I could not use right out of the box, except for maybe some de-stinking on a few.  I was once interested in rapid break in methods but I have become more zen as time goes on and see break in as part of the experience. It will be broken in for ever once it happens, it's only new once.

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 03-06-2015, 11:54 AM
#19
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To each his own. I won´t spend time on my face with a half-ready boar brush anymore. SOTD was with Mühle R41, no nicks, babysmooth, and the Proraso brush, after at least half a dozen uses it was still feeling like broken glass. 10 minutes makes a world of a difference, and 30 minutes may make it outright awesome to you...

Soaking my boars for some more time before the shave would help, as it does when cooking spaghetti.
at the state they are in (about 20 uses max) they eat lather and do not compare with my other brushes.
Time will tell me what the real deal is. My mileage has brought some strange things, as I have found to love Derby blades ATG with my Mühle R41.
So this is just where I am at right now.

Concerning the general message above:
This method does make a new Boar brush useable within a  short time of dedicated break-in

Philipp

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 03-08-2015, 04:46 AM
#20
  • MikekiM
  • Senior Member
  • Long Island, NY
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I've broken in so many boars over the years it would be impossible to count.  Boars exclusively for me..

I can get a boar in usable condition in about a week.  It's my opinion that the splitting process is as much about lathering as it is about drying.  I lather a new brush a few times a day, but skip a day or two at the start to allow the hairs to dry as much as possible.  And, between lathering & drying, I simply roll the tips of the hairs (wet and dry) between thumb and forefinger...  small batches of hair at a time.  Gently rolling rather twisting which will likely damage the hair shaft...

Works for me..

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