07-07-2015, 05:22 AM
#41
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Oral B pro 7000 for me.  Great brush and nice design.

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 07-11-2015, 07:58 AM
#42
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I have been using a Braun Oral B Pro for donkey's years and couldn't be happier. My current brush is at least 5 years old(not the head! Biggrin ) and the battery is still going, as new.
I just happened to look on their website, this morning, to see what's now available. I can't believe they are now selling toothbrushes with Bluetooth, for linking with your mobile phone. What next? This to me sounds a bit like the app that's available to switch on your kettle. Unfortunately, it doesn't fill it, first, so what's the point?

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 07-11-2015, 11:16 AM
#43
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(03-07-2015, 12:35 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: Ohhhh noooo.......YMMV also applies to electric toothbrushes, I guess - WHAT A HUGE SURPRISE  Tongue Biggrin

I just found an offer for the topmodel Oral-B Pro 7000, now I also consider getting this in order for me to test both out side by side - what we wet shavers must go through in order for us to know what is the best of the best - it's a tough world out there  Wink

Well, there was a controlled field test a few years back by an objective third party organization.  I cannot recall with certainty who conducted it, but it may be that I am recalling this study, which was conducted by scientists from the Universities of Birmingham, Edinburgh, Manchester, and Sheffield, and which concluded that only one type of electric toothbrush produced better results than brushing with a manual toothbrush despite being many times more expensive.
Quote:[R]esearch was coordinated by the Cochrane Oral Health Group, an independent group of experts who examined results from 29 clinical trials of electric toothbrushes involving 2,500 people.
The brushes were split into five types, depending on the action of their heads:  
  • side-to-side
  • circular
  • ultra-sonic vibration
  • rotation-oscillation in which a circular head spins back and forth in quick bursts
  • counter oscillation, in which tufts of bristles rotate in different directions simultaneously
Only the rotation-oscillation brushes out-performed manual brushing.
They removed around 7% more plaque and led to 17% less gum disease than manual brushes.

The report did not name brands, but did distinguish between brushing systems according to the axis of rotation of the bristles: that is, between a side-to-side (axial rotation of the shaft) action of the bristles and a rotation oscillation (circular rotation around an axis perpendicular to the shaft):  in other words, between the Philips (side-to-side rotation around the axis of the shaft) and the Oral-B (rotation-oscillation around an axis perpendicular to the shaft).  

In general, brushes that rotate in a circular motion around an axis perpendicular to the shaft should be more effective to remove lodged debris and plaque for most users because the angle of placement of the bristles onto the user’s teeth is not as critical as with a side-to-side motion, which requires the bristles’ motion faithfully to align with and track the direction of the gaps between the teeth from the gum line downward.  The tickling sensation that a rotary action brush gives, incidentally, is also known as gum stimulation, and most dentists regard it as a good thing.

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 07-14-2015, 12:16 AM
#44
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(07-11-2015, 11:16 AM)Mel S Meles Wrote:
(03-07-2015, 12:35 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: Ohhhh noooo.......YMMV also applies to electric toothbrushes, I guess - WHAT A HUGE SURPRISE  Tongue Biggrin

I just found an offer for the topmodel Oral-B Pro 7000, now I also consider getting this in order for me to test both out side by side - what we wet shavers must go through in order for us to know what is the best of the best - it's a tough world out there  Wink

Well, there was a controlled field test a few years back by an objective third party organization.  I cannot recall with certainty who conducted it, but it may be that I am recalling this study, which was conducted by scientists from the Universities of Birmingham, Edinburgh, Manchester, and Sheffield, and which concluded that only one type of electric toothbrush produced better results than brushing with a manual toothbrush despite being many times more expensive.
Quote:[R]esearch was coordinated by the Cochrane Oral Health Group, an independent group of experts who examined results from 29 clinical trials of electric toothbrushes involving 2,500 people.
The brushes were split into five types, depending on the action of their heads:  
  • side-to-side
  • circular
  • ultra-sonic vibration
  • rotation-oscillation in which a circular head spins back and forth in quick bursts
  • counter oscillation, in which tufts of bristles rotate in different directions simultaneously
Only the rotation-oscillation brushes out-performed manual brushing.
They removed around 7% more plaque and led to 17% less gum disease than manual brushes.

The report did not name brands, but did distinguish between brushing systems according to the axis of rotation of the bristles: that is, between a side-to-side (axial rotation of the shaft) action of the bristles and a rotation oscillation (circular rotation around an axis perpendicular to the shaft):  in other words, between the Philips (side-to-side rotation around the axis of the shaft) and the Oral-B (rotation-oscillation around an axis perpendicular to the shaft).  

In general, brushes that rotate in a circular motion around an axis perpendicular to the shaft should be more effective to remove lodged debris and plaque for most users because the angle of placement of the bristles onto the user’s teeth is not as critical as with a side-to-side motion, which requires the bristles’ motion faithfully to align with and track the direction of the gaps between the teeth from the gum line downward.  The tickling sensation that a rotary action brush gives, incidentally, is also known as gum stimulation, and most dentists regard it as a good thing.

Let's hear Merkur Man's take on this.

Unfortunately there is no such thing as a 'controlled field test' with an 'objective third party' IMHO.

Money, hidden sponsor ships and supposed neutral support can be hidden so easily behind second and third party persons that we just can't trust anything 100% in this day and age.

Not trying to sound paranoid, but it's well known doctors, hospitals and even supposedly neutral study groups at universities are being sponsored in the dark.

So I take all these tests with a grain of salt. Especially when the conclusion is that one toothbrush prevails - even though it's not mentioned by actual name, and another one loses the battle

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 07-14-2015, 06:22 PM
#45
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The Cochrane Oral Health Group comprises an international network of healthcare professionals, researchers and consumers who work together to prepare, maintain, and disseminate systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials in oral health.  Bottom line, it is a very trustworthy source.
The study Mel S Meles cited, that compared the different electric toothbrushes based on the action of the brush head, has been replicated, to compare the action of the of the Oral B (rotation-oscillation) and Sonicare (side-to-side).   The results of this study are:
There is some evidence that rotation oscillation brushes reduce plaque and gingivitis more than side to side brushes in the short term. This difference is small and it's clinical importance is unclear. Further trials of good quality are required to assess the superiority of other modes of action for powered toothbrushes.
In all honesty, I don't think it matters which toothbrush you choose.  The more important thing for us to worry about is proper brush placement/angulation and ensuring an appropriate amount of time is spent brushing.  Truth be told, I have seen patients who use electric toothbrushes ineffectively who have much far more gum inflammation (gingivitis) than some other people who use manual toothbrushes.  It truly boils down to using whichever tool you choose correctly.

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 07-17-2015, 01:01 AM
#46
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Sonic-care Stage 2. That thing rocks.

0 48
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 07-21-2015, 06:15 PM
#47
  • Deuce
  • Just a guy
  • Cave Creek
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Sonic Care. Been using the brand for many years. Outstanding quality

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 08-29-2015, 01:56 PM
#48
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I have now so far settled with both top models.
Use the Oral B for first pass WTG Biggrin  for regular cleaning, then use the Philips Sonicare Diamond for second pass and touch ups  Tongue

Works like a charm so far.

I feel the Oral B is better for cleaning my teeth in general and for difficult to reach spots, while I feel the Sonicare is better for the gum massage and removing plaque along the teeth-flesh line.

If I was to keep one, I would keep the Oral Pro 7000, but for gum massage I feel the Sonicare Diamond is superior, so I use and keep both  Smile

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 08-29-2015, 07:35 PM
#49
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(08-29-2015, 01:56 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: I have now so far settled with both top models.
Use the Oral B for first pass WTG Biggrin  for regular cleaning, then use the Philips Sonicare Diamond for second pass and touch ups  Tongue

Works like a charm so far.
Laughing1

75 2,305
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 08-29-2015, 07:49 PM
#50
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(08-29-2015, 07:35 PM)merkur man Wrote:
(08-29-2015, 01:56 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: I have now so far settled with both top models.
Use the Oral B for first pass WTG Biggrin  for regular cleaning, then use the Philips Sonicare Diamond for second pass and touch ups  Tongue

Works like a charm so far.
Laughing1
+1  Signs011

20 1,362
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 09-02-2015, 01:12 PM
#51
  • Irv
  • Ex-Lurker
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(03-06-2015, 06:34 PM)CHSeifert Wrote: So I have tried 3 Oral B, and a couple of different heads, and they all tickle me and just not seem to work for me.

So I ordered the Philips Sonicare Diamons Clean black edition with 4 extra black heads.

Anyone who has experience with this and who also have used the Braun Oral-B ?

Which one do you prefer ?

I have used both snooker and oral b, and like the sonicare much better

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 09-02-2015, 06:06 PM
#52
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Sonic Care2 Biggrin

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 09-03-2015, 08:51 AM
#53
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(05-21-2015, 11:34 AM)merkur man Wrote:
(05-20-2015, 03:49 PM)tinashubby Wrote: I'm on my second or third oral-b. My teeth just feel cleaner than with a manual.

That's because they actually are cleaner! I tell all of my patients that if they'd like to have that just cleaned feeling to use an electric toothbrush.  They remove many times more plaque and bacteria than manual toothbrushes.

Is this true regardless of the technique one uses with a manual brush?  I ask because I see most people just scrubbing the brush back and forth all the way from back to front, which doesn't really get much of the interdental plaque near the gumline.  

I use a manual brush but I angle it up toward the gumline and then gently move it in a very small motion in one place for a few seconds, then lift it and move to the next couple of teeth and repeat.  it takes me about 3 minutes to brush in this way.  The bristles are getting in between the teeth and up by the gumline because of the way I am moving the brush back and forth and very slightly around and around in one place for several seconds.  I feel that using this method I can get the same amount of plaque that I could get with an electric toothbrush. 


(By the way, I used to use an electric but I quit for one reason.  I would ALWAYS get fungus growing inside the snap-on brush part, even if I removed it every night from the toothbrush.  I couldn't figure out how to keep it from getting fungus growing in it, so I switched back to manual brushing.)

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 09-03-2015, 09:43 AM
#54
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(09-03-2015, 08:51 AM)kingfisher Wrote:
(05-21-2015, 11:34 AM)merkur man Wrote:
(05-20-2015, 03:49 PM)tinashubby Wrote: I'm on my second or third oral-b. My teeth just feel cleaner than with a manual.

That's because they actually are cleaner! I tell all of my patients that if they'd like to have that just cleaned feeling to use an electric toothbrush.  They remove many times more plaque and bacteria than manual toothbrushes.

Is this true regardless of the technique one uses with a manual brush?  I ask because I see most people just scrubbing the brush back and forth all the way from back to front, which doesn't really get much of the interdental plaque near the gumline.  

I use a manual brush but I angle it up toward the gumline and then gently move it in a very small motion in one place for a few seconds, then lift it and move to the next couple of teeth and repeat.  it takes me about 3 minutes to brush in this way.  The bristles are getting in between the teeth and up by the gumline because of the way I am moving the brush back and forth and very slightly around and around in one place for several seconds.  I feel that using this method I can get the same amount of plaque that I could get with an electric toothbrush. 


(By the way, I used to use an electric but I quit for one reason.  I would ALWAYS get fungus growing inside the snap-on brush part, even if I removed it every night from the toothbrush.  I couldn't figure out how to keep it from getting fungus growing in it, so I switched back to manual brushing.)
Sounds like you have developed a great technique.  You're right, you can do a really great job with a manual brush if you know how to use it properly.  For the average Joe that just seems to scrub back and forth the electric brush provides a more effective means of plaque removal.  That being said, even an electric brush needs to placed properly against the teeth and gums if it is going to work as effectively as possible.
I have never seen a fungus growing at the brush/handle interface.  I can understand the hesitancy to use it if this was a recurring event. I mostly just find toothpaste build-up there, and I simply clean it when I'm done brushing.

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 09-04-2015, 09:29 AM
#55
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I clean both my oral b and sonicare diamond after use and for me personally they remove more plaque than I have ever been able to with a manual.
I honestly feel like being at the dentist when I have used both 2 minutes. To avoid wearing my teeth down I only use electric once daily. Then manual

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 09-04-2015, 04:45 PM
#56
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(09-03-2015, 08:51 AM)kingfisher Wrote:
(05-21-2015, 11:34 AM)merkur man Wrote:
(05-20-2015, 03:49 PM)tinashubby Wrote: I'm on my second or third oral-b. My teeth just feel cleaner than with a manual.

That's because they actually are cleaner! I tell all of my patients that if they'd like to have that just cleaned feeling to use an electric toothbrush.  They remove many times more plaque and bacteria than manual toothbrushes.

Is this true regardless of the technique one uses with a manual brush?  I ask because I see most people just scrubbing the brush back and forth all the way from back to front, which doesn't really get much of the interdental plaque near the gumline.  

I use a manual brush but I angle it up toward the gumline and then gently move it in a very small motion in one place for a few seconds, then lift it and move to the next couple of teeth and repeat.  it takes me about 3 minutes to brush in this way.  The bristles are getting in between the teeth and up by the gumline because of the way I am moving the brush back and forth and very slightly around and around in one place for several seconds.  I feel that using this method I can get the same amount of plaque that I could get with an electric toothbrush. 


(By the way, I used to use an electric but I quit for one reason.  I would ALWAYS get fungus growing inside the snap-on brush part, even if I removed it every night from the toothbrush.  I couldn't figure out how to keep it from getting fungus growing in it, so I switched back to manual brushing.)


This sounds like the Bass Method. I just received my Bass brushes and used both the brush and technique this morning with some pretty impressive results. I look forward to seeing what I notice over the next few weeks. My electric will be sitting on the sidelines for the time being.

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 05-23-2017, 09:27 PM
#57
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So, I know that this is an older posting, but I decided to add my comments anyway.
I went to the dentist a month ago and had my teeth cleaned. As my dental hygienist is cleaning my teeth, she asks what kind of toothbrush I use. I tell her that I'm using a manual toothbrush. My dental hygienist then tells me that I she recommends I get a Sonicare. So, when I get home from the dentist. I order a Sonicare Flexcare from Amazon.
I have been really happy with the way it cleans my teeth.

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 05-24-2017, 06:28 AM
#58
  • SCOV
  • Active Member
  • Minnesota
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I use the Quip toothbrush.  Subscription service - several options - I did the $40 toothbrush (now $45) and $5 every 3 months for new brush head and battery.   have been using the Quip for about 18 months now.

My dentist comments that my gums look better since using the Quip.  I brought the Quip in for his and staff opinion - all favorable.  Brush head meets his "soft" bristle requirements.  Other patients now using.

A few other side benefits 1) AAA battery powered so no charger to plug in  2) nice plastic travel tube  3) nice size and shape  4) for toothbrush heads, I like the subscription service concept

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 05-26-2017, 07:56 AM
#59
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I like the Oral B over the sonicare.... I have sensitive teeth and prefer the rotating brush over the vibrating head... have used both and both work fine,,, just personal preference I guess.

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 07-22-2017, 11:21 AM
#60
  • Boba81
  • Junior Member
  • Toronto, Canada
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Braun has never failed me. Five years and going. Only changed the battery and brush heads.

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