03-13-2015, 08:41 AM
#1
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I'm interested in both gluten-free and carb-less diets and open to suggestions for replacement foods, recipes, or any info from anyone who has already tried these and knows the in and outs. I'd like to take a break from the usual bread and oatmeal staples, for starters. Thanks.

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 03-13-2015, 11:01 AM
#2
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(03-13-2015, 08:41 AM)rsp1202 Wrote: I'm interested in both gluten-free and carb-less diets and open to suggestions for replacement foods, recipes, or any info from anyone who has already tried these and knows the in and outs. I'd like to take a break from the usual bread and oatmeal staples, for starters. Thanks.

There are so many good products out there now for gluten free. We bought some almond crackers the other day. No gluten with a nice flavor. Also, gluten free pizza dough is not half bad. 

Now for "carb-less" or could it be said, "less-carb." Veggies will have carbs but which ones are low in carbs. Here's a chart for some:

[Image: abWacxj.jpg]

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 03-13-2015, 01:22 PM
#3
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When I first read the post I just went, "WOW!".

I have to ask, is there a medical reason for this? Carbs are important in a healthy diet. I'm just curious, I promise I won't scold.

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 03-13-2015, 02:57 PM
#4
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Thanks for the chart, Aaron. Looks like most of my favorite veggies are low in carbs.
Brian, it's been difficult to cook and eat fresh all the time. I get in some Mediterranean-style every so often, but my lazy diet still contains too much wheat and canned/frozen. I'd like to lose some weight and lower my blood pressure, get back to my "Dagwood" days, minus the hair.

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 03-13-2015, 10:07 PM
#5
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Steak & Eggs. Just research Vince Gironda. 

The high level of carbs we consume daily are (not so) slowly killing us. 

Also take a look around the Weston A. Price foundation website. 

Then you'll need to decide on the blue pill or the red pill before going further down the rabbit hole. 

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 03-14-2015, 06:03 AM
#6
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Fascinating reading, Brian. Thanks.

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 03-14-2015, 06:24 AM
#7
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I eat grain-free and low-carb, high fat, basically a Paleo diet.  There are some great Paleo recipe books out there, Against All Grain has some of my favorites.  The "Well Fed Paleo" cookbooks are great as well.

One of my favorite snacks is Whole Foods Applewood smoked bacon, best tasting bacon I've found yet.  I eat this straight up, as a BLT (use iceberg lettuce as a wrap), cooked on top of fish, broiled with broccoli, etc.

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 03-14-2015, 06:48 AM
#8
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I'll check out your recommendations, David, and try some of that bacon next time I'm at Whole Foods.
Against All Grain is the Danielle Walker cookbook, and the Well Fed Paleo is Melissa Joulwan?
Thanks!

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 03-14-2015, 07:06 AM
#9
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Ron, correct on all counts - enjoy!

Also, some of my favorite travel snacks:

http://www.amazon.com/Grass-Run-Farms-Gr...NKJF6W62HE

http://www.amazon.com/Tanka-Bites-Pepper...anka+bites

https://www.stevespaleogoods.com/paleokr...l-cinn.htm


(03-14-2015, 06:48 AM)rsp1202 Wrote: I'll check out your recommendations, David, and try some of that bacon next time I'm at Whole Foods. Against All Grain is the Danielle Walker cookbook, and the Well Fed Paleo is Melissa Joulwan? Thanks!

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 03-14-2015, 07:43 AM
#10
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All bookmarked. Thanks, again.

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 03-14-2015, 10:31 AM
#11
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Just sayin'... Maybe it's not so much the carbs or grains that we eat, but that they are all processed into something other than what our bodies were designed to handle. The "grain" we eat today isn't grain at all. It's not designed to nourish, but designed for shelf life.

Even if one buys what is called "whole wheat" it's a far cry from actual whole wheat. Modern flour making insures that the various good parts of the grain is removed. Then to turn it into Dr. Frankensteins creation just certain parts are added back. Naturally the good parts aren't added back since those parts that are good for us will spoil and reduce the shelf life from years to months.

One might be able to get true whole grain flour from a health food store, but if so, it'll be in the refrigerator section to prolong it's life (it goes rancid). Or one can do as I do and grind it fresh directly from the berry. It does NOT act the same as modern flour* and tricks must be employed to  make bread and such that is more like what we're accustomed to. But the flavor is far better than any store bought loaf, and to look at it one can't tell a loaf made from true whole wheat from the imitation reconstituted "whole wheat". If I use white wheat it looks like a standard loaf of quality bread from the market. Of course the real stuff tastes much better. The flavor can taste "just better" to actually a much stronger wheat taste. The latter will use fresh ground hard red wheat and will yield a dark loaf without the addition of anything to deliberately make it dark.

*There are parts of the grain berry that go out of their way to resist it being made into a loaf.

A good book on the subject is "Flour Power" by Basey, published by Jermar Press.

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 03-15-2015, 07:22 AM
#12
  • Andy77
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  • Santa Cruz, CA
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I'm one who believes -if not entirely succeeds in eating- a plant based,whole food diet.  No meat, all grain everything, no refined or processed anything.  

Most new diets first step, though, is to cut out refined sugar and white flour, increase vegetable intake and at least cut back on high fat animal proteins. If you're there already, good on you...continue refining.  If not, I think this is the good first step.

Your average American eats something like 19% of their calories from nutrition-less refined sugar and white flour, and eats like 1 serving of veggies per day.  Fix that and we don't have a health care funding crisis anymore!

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 03-15-2015, 08:34 AM
#13
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I was going to post much the same stuff as the last couple of posters here. I am a scientist who has studied and lectured on diets and nutrition (though it's a little out of my research specialty). The main takeaway from all the recent research into diet and nutrition is that the issue is more about the amount of processed foods that we intake rather than the breakdown of carbs/protein/fats.

We need some of all of those items in our diets, but the less processing of the food, the better. Whole (and varied) grains are really healthy and good for weight management. Processed grains are pretty much empty carbs. We need fats, and even bacon fat is actually good for you in moderate amounts. Highly processed meats are pretty much dangerous because of the amounts of nitrites and salts and other junk added to them. Plant and animal protein sources are all great as long as you balance them properly. 

I cut out all processed carbs from my diet a while ago, and lost a lot of weight, but then yo-yoed back up. Now I use grains as and when I want them, but have replaced the processed grains with a variety of whole grains. My weight has dropped, and my diet has improved. 

Also, those whole grains are really nice to eat - they taste great and have complex flavours and textures. 

Finally, weight is only one aspect of health. Overall nutrition is more important. I think that paying attention to a well-rounded nutrition profile is what we need to be paying attention to. 

EDIT: I don't want to give anyone the idea that I'm an expert on nutrition. I have read quite a bit of the recent primary research on diet efficacy and nutrition, and I've learned a lot over the last year or so. I'm sure there's a lot I haven't read about and know little about. My comments above are a synopsis of some of what I've learned. 

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 03-15-2015, 09:40 AM
#14
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Not to start a debate, but their are over 200 peer-reviewed studies which conclude that grains are harmful to your health. 

I encourage you to spend some time delving into some of this research.

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 03-15-2015, 09:43 AM
#15
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One thing I've shied away from lately is hydrogenated oil, replacing that with olive oil wherever I can. I still have lots to cut out since there's so much of it mixed in with all kinds of food. I love hummus, for example, but either have to find a brand that uses olive oil instead of canola/etc., or cut it out completely.


My local Latin market did have some gluten-free tortillas -- surprise, surprise -- and while it's kind of wimpy in comparison to the regular flour or corn tortillas I used to eat, at least I feel better in having found some. I'm also cutting out oatmeal for breakfast (haven't found a gluten-free version yet). I figured that quinoa could act as a substitute, but I used to eat that cereal and it was an acquired taste. Same substitution on spaghetti and pasta in general: amaranth- or quinoa-based instead of durum wheat. Doing away with grains completely, spaghetti squash might be an even better choice.

I'm learning as I go, and for now the websites connected with the cookbooks mentioned above are a good resource.

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 03-15-2015, 10:09 AM
#16
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(03-15-2015, 09:40 AM)david1201 Wrote: Not to start a debate, but their are over 200 peer-reviewed studies which conclude that grains are harmful to your health. 

I encourage you to spend some time delving into some of this research.

True. But you have to keep in mind that science keeps moving forward. Just because something is published, doesn't make it absolute 'truth'. As the same scientists delve further into the topic, they adjust their conclusions (if they're good scientists). 

Now, is grain good for you? That depends on who you are and how much you eat. The whole 'we didn't evolve to eat grain' argument doesn't take into consideration that we have continued to evolve since the time that we added grain to our diet. Not everyone reacts positively to grain. Not everyone should eat only meat protein either. People in areas that have survived for thousands of years on vegetarian diets don't respond the same way to grain as people who have survived for the same period on meats. 

I have read some of the papers that point out the negative nutritive aspects of grains. They generally A) only mention this in passing while actually focusing on something else, or B) are looking at a portion of the population that respond negatively to grain. There are very few comprehensive studies that conclude that grain is bad for you. In fact, most of the really highly-regarded studies show the opposite (in general - there are always outliers).

One concrete example: for decades people have been cautioned about the cholesterol that eggs (with yolk) provide, and how bad that is. Newer research has shown that egg consumption has very little (if any) effect on your blood cholesterol levels, as that is controlled by the cholesterol actually produced by your body. In fact, more recent research shows that actually consuming cholesterol may drop blood cholesterol levels in your body. 

-----------------------

When I'm teaching, I keep reminding my students that what they're learning is the general case. They are the only people who can find out what works for them. Everyone has to figure out what sort of nutrition balance works for them. 

Again, just focusing on weight (important as it is) may lead you to ignore other aspects of balanced nutrition. Try different things and see what works for you. 

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 03-15-2015, 10:24 AM
#17
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Ron -

For the hummus - it's pretty easy to make it yourself. That way you can cut out what you want. Basic recipes call for chickpeas, olive oil, garlic and lemon and spices. You don't even need tahini. 

Cutting out hydrogenated oil is a good idea. Saturated fats and trans fats are generally considered to be bad for heart-health. Since there are multiple alternatives to this, there's little reason to keep them in your diet. 
 

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 03-15-2015, 10:32 AM
#18
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Thanks, Yohann.

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 03-15-2015, 01:41 PM
#19
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FWIW, your hummis, made to your spec's and taste is so superior to what you can buy it's not even a contest. I find bought hummis to be largely horrid and tasteless. Once you make your own you'll never buy any more hummis ready made.

As far as oils go, it's not only olive oil, but olive oil is actively good for the body. There is also grapeseed oil and coconut oil. At least those are the few we use since we can't stock every oil. Look into it for yourself and make the choices. Don't look at one source but really look into things. It takes time to research something. If one doesn't care about oneself, then why should the Dr. who needs the mortgage payment?

But don't go overboard either way. Enjoy life and do good for yourself when you can, dodge the bad when you can. It's all about balance and tipping the scales in your favor.

It's all about educating oneself, and understand that "feeling pain" in a diet or whatever to lengthen life doesn't mean that you'll live even one minute longer. But you might pay for the BMW or make a house payment for the white jacketed witchdoctor who gets you to spend $ in his direction.

We have become so incredibly mislead as far as nutrition in the US, and the folks who are supposed to be in charge of that are only chasing a career (the FDA is what I have in mind- they're just career prostitutes).

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 03-15-2015, 03:34 PM
#20
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Thanks, Brian. I'll check out the grapeseed and coconut oils, and will look forward to making my first batch of hummus.

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