03-23-2015, 06:33 AM
#1
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One of the things that I like most about Simpson's brushes is the engraved lettering, it will just never wear away like the silk screened labels do.  I recently chatted with David (The Monk) about a process he uses to fill in the engraved letters with black ink/paint to make the lettering stand out, similar to what Simpson does on it's Limited Edition brush handles.  I had an older Chubby 1 two-band Super that had lost it's sticker so I decided to try my hand at what David had described. 
A few Google searches later I felt armed with the necessary knowledge to attempt the process.  It is quite simple, a bit of sign painters enamel paint (available from art supply stores), some mineral spirits, business cards and a blank piece of paper are all that is needed. 

Here are the results:
Before                                                 
[Image: 7nofWw8.jpg]


After
[Image: 2RAqoaN.jpg]

In reality the process is pretty simple.  Paint over the letters with sign painters enamel paint.  Remove the excess just after application with something stiff ie. a business card.  Allow to dry for ~10 minutes.  Slightly wet a blank piece of paper with mineral spirits (no soaking/dripping, just until you can see that the paper is wet but almost can't feel that it's wet).  The blank paper is the key.  If you put the mineral spirits on something like a towel it would remove the paint from the engraving and you'll have to start all over again.

Thanks David for the idea! I much prefer the black lettering myself.  I even have a few replacement stickers coming from Mark to finish the job. 



[Image: BwgIpOT.jpg]

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 03-23-2015, 06:36 AM
#2
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Very nice !!

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 03-23-2015, 06:41 AM
#3
  • refles
  • Senior Member
  • New York
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Great effort.. love it, the lettering is so bold again.

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 03-23-2015, 06:42 AM
#4
  • MaxP
  • Senior Member
  • Madison, WI
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Great tips. Especially the business card dampened with mineral spirits.
You're quite right that a rag usually removes the paint from within the lettering.

Thanks.

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 03-23-2015, 06:46 AM
#5
  • Agravic
  • Super Moderator
  • Pennsylvania, USA
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Nicely done, Nathan.

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 03-23-2015, 06:51 AM
#6
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Nicely done! I have to try that on my Duke 3. Smile

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 03-23-2015, 06:52 AM
#7
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Fantastic, Nathan. Thank you. I have a CH1 that is in dire need of this.

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 03-23-2015, 07:20 AM
#8
  • robk
  • Senior Member
  • New Jersey
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nice tip. great result. thx for sharing this!

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 03-23-2015, 07:36 AM
#9
  • TheMonk
  • Super Moderator
  • Porto, Portugal
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Very nice work, Nathan! I'm guessing what the engraver I know here does is something very similar to this.

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 03-23-2015, 07:39 AM
#10
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Nice Job !

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 03-23-2015, 07:41 AM
#11
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Excellent work, Nathan!  Thumbup

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 03-23-2015, 08:08 AM
#12
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Looks great! I too don't like the screen print (always comes off).


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 03-23-2015, 10:38 AM
#13
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Funny you post this Nathan, I do the same thing to many of my brushes. 

My only concern with this is do you think people will be funny about buying a brush that has this done to it? I say this only because I have a brush I'm going to be posting in the BST. For full disclosure I do say that I've done it to the brush. 

I'd be curious if anyone would shy away from a brush that has been minimally altered in this way. I think it looks great and will continue to do it to my brushes.

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 03-23-2015, 11:34 AM
#14
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Thanks for all the kind remarks guys! I too think it came out quite nice!

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 03-23-2015, 11:35 AM
#15
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(03-23-2015, 10:38 AM)GregMacMan Wrote: Funny you post this Nathan, I do the same thing to many of my brushes. 

My only concern with this is do you think people will be funny about buying a brush that has this done to it? I say this only because I have a brush I'm going to be posting in the BST. For full disclosure I do say that I've done it to the brush. 

I'd be curious if anyone would shy away from a brush that has been minimally altered in this way. I think it looks great and will continue to do it to my brushes.
Good question. I imagine that there would be certain individuals that might not like it, I can understand that I guess. I am the same as you though, I much prefer it and think I will likely do it to more of my brushes as needed.  I also think you're right to disclose this fact in the case of a sale. 

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 03-23-2015, 01:03 PM
#16
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I've done this to a few of mine that are looking a bit tired.

I dab on, leave for a few mins and then use a bit of nail varnish remover and a stiff kitchen towel to wipe off. Works great and providing you only buff lightly, it will be very easy to get a great result.

I have a pot of enamel paint which matches the Simpson original colour rather than filling with black but I will have to dig it out if anyone is interested?


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 03-23-2015, 01:06 PM
#17
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I also found that a small beading needle that you get from a hobby/craft store works great for removing any of the remaining original Simpson paint.

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 03-23-2015, 01:21 PM
#18
  • blzrfn
  • Butterscotch Bandit
  • Vancouver USA
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(03-23-2015, 11:35 AM)merkur man Wrote:
(03-23-2015, 10:38 AM)GregMacMan Wrote: Funny you post this Nathan, I do the same thing to many of my brushes. 

My only concern with this is do you think people will be funny about buying a brush that has this done to it? I say this only because I have a brush I'm going to be posting in the BST. For full disclosure I do say that I've done it to the brush. 

I'd be curious if anyone would shy away from a brush that has been minimally altered in this way. I think it looks great and will continue to do it to my brushes.
Good question. I imagine that there would be certain individuals that might not like it, I can understand that I guess. I am the same as you though, I much prefer it and think I will likely do it to more of my brushes as needed.  I also think you're right to disclose this fact in the case of a sale.

I don't think it will hurt the value of a modern brush today.  Down the line the alteration could potentially effect the desirability as most collectors want a piece in original condition.  For instance, there was a fad where people were putting clear nail polish over the lamp blacking on Simpsons brushes.  I inadvertently purchased one of these brushes and I would much prefer it not have had it done and I would say this diminished the value of the brush to me. 

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 03-23-2015, 01:55 PM
#19
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Well put blzfrn. I agree, although I think the nail polish and what I have done are a far cry from one another. The nail polish looks horrible, while what I have done would only be able to be discerned by someone who knew Simpson didn't originally offer the brush with black lettering.
I always feel bad when I see a nice old Somerset covered with nail polish, although I understand the reason it was applied. To me this really diminishes the value of the brush.


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 03-23-2015, 02:02 PM
#20
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I've done it once in the past, it looks cool, but I wouldn't do it again.  I also worry the mineral spirits may damage the polish on the brush.

Agreed on full disclosure and making sure that any potential future buyers know what has been done.

You did a fine job on it and it looks very professional from the pics.

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