03-31-2015, 07:54 PM
#1
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I am a 50- something returnee to the game after a decade hiatus and am ready for a next set of clubs. I currently have a set of Tommy Armour 845's that are ok, but I'll looking to move up to a nice, pre-owned set of forgiving oversize irons. Ned advice on what models would be worth looking at. I don't want to buy new right now, as I know that in a year, my game should improve enought to get that reward! Suggestions?

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 03-31-2015, 07:57 PM
#2
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duplicate - sorry

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 03-31-2015, 09:33 PM
#3
  • evnpar
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  • Portland, Oregon
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(03-31-2015, 07:54 PM)jwr0201 Wrote: I am a 50- something returnee to the game after a decade hiatus and am ready for a next set of clubs.  I currently have a set of Tommy Armour 845's that are ok, but I'll looking to move up to a nice, pre-owned set of forgiving oversize irons.  Ned advice on what models would be worth looking at.  I don't want to buy new right now, as I know that in a year, my game should improve enought to get that reward!  Suggestions?

That's almost like asking about the best razor, soap, camera, or car, as someone's preference in clubs is very personal. I find players are either into the clubs their favorite golf star plays, or are into the latest technology. All of the major brands focus on the average golfer, as there are just more of them than scratch golfers. I am partial to Callaway or Adams Golf for the golfer over 50. I'd consider visiting a pro shop where you can try out different new clubs. Once you have an idea of what you might like, you could look for last year's closeouts on sale, or for a lightly used set. It's essential that you have them fitted. You'll never improve with improperly fitted clubs. It only takes a few moments to determine the proper lie of irons, and it's not expensive to have them adjusted. I would try to avoid getting caught up in modern technology. The handicap of the average golfer hasn't declined over the past 10 - 15 years, in spite of the technological changes. The pros can now hit it out of site because of improvement in drivers and the golf ball, but the average golfer struggles to hit it past 200 - 250 yards, even with the "increased club head speed" now being advertised for drivers. Get a good set that is well fit, and invest in lessons from a good teaching pro, then hit the practice range. Since 90% of shots are from 100 yards in, I prefer to invest in a good set of wedges, and spend most of my time working on shots around the green. Enjoy!

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 04-01-2015, 11:12 AM
#4
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I think the Callaway X-20 Tour would be perfect for you. The technology for those are still good and you can get them for a decent price now. The regular X-20s are the full oversized. The tour model is still oversized but no offset. They're so forgiving that it's hard to shape the ball. Find ones that already have Project X rifle shafts in your desired flex. These heads are heavy so a 5.0 is about a regular flex.

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