04-04-2015, 08:58 AM
#1
  • SRNewb
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  • No. Va, USA
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Yes, you read the title right.
Firstly, I do not intend this thread to be a discussion on religion, the bible, or proper practice and care of bibles.
As  preacher and Sunday School teacher, I find that I make a lot of notations in  the borders of the pages in my bibles. I know that there are some people who are offended by the very thought of writing on the pages of a bible. Not here to debate this. There are those that believe it aids them, and those that have strongly held views against the practice.

My question is in regards to the fountain pen. I usually use a ball point, and just recently began the FP.
Since most of the paper in really well made bibles tends to be rather fine and delicate, I am wondering about blotching, bleed through, etc., when using a fountain pen. I use a medium nib Franklin Covey Freemont, with at the moment, Franklin Covey black in cartridges. I plan to purchase a converter, and use Noodler's X feather black in the near future.
Any experiences others may have with this will be greatly appreciated.
Thank you.

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 04-04-2015, 09:48 AM
#2
  • freddy
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  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Mike, I think your question is a valid one, and not just for the Bible but for any scholarly work.  Very often these are written on very fine paper, even massed produced and easily replaceable books. 

Some thoughts, if I may. Use trial and error.  For example, try writing your name on an opening page of your Bible that does not have biblical verse on it, where you would normally take notes.  How does the writing experience feel?  Is the paper so thin and light that bleed-through or ghosting is a problem?  If it is then would using a lighter gray ink help?  Would this paper lend itself better to a smooth writing fine or extra fine nib? If you have your heart set on black ink then which would be the best for the type of paper in your Bible?  For that last question, why not look at the Goulet Pen Company site as you can find different ink qualities listed for some inks.  They have a great chart for Noodler's inks: https://www.gouletpens.com/files/s8588/1...erties.pdf.  Also, on his blog, Brian Goulet happened to mention that he just got done reading his Bible.  Why not e-mail him and ask him if he has taken notes in his Bible and, if so, what suggestions he might have.  You have nothing to lose.

If you do find a good solution, would you consider posting it here as it might be of interest to others dealing with this type of pen to paper issue?  All good luck in your quest. Thumbsup  

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 04-05-2015, 02:35 AM
#3
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Good question.  I have found over the years that the paper used in most Bibles does not lend itself to fountain pens...too thin.  I like to use a .5mm pencil.  Allows me to print notes in the usually small spaces and erase any mistakes.

Ed

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 04-05-2015, 07:27 PM
#4
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Best of luck, Mike and I would have to concur with Freddy and suggest an extra-fine nib to experiment and see what happens. 

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 04-05-2015, 08:00 PM
#5
  • SRNewb
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  • No. Va, USA
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I used it a bit for the Sunday School lesson prep this morning. The bible I use for this is a very high quality one, so maybe that has something to do with it, but I got no more bleed through than my regular ball point (very little). I think the Franklin Covey ink might be on the dry side, as I can write with it and it will immediately dry enough so that there is minimal smearing when I swipe it with my hand. So I think the ink is pretty important. 
I think I will look for a decent, affordable pen with an extra fine nib, as recommended. I think that's really good advice. Anyone got any recommendations for good black ink that is on the dry side? I think that combo might work out best.

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 04-05-2015, 08:07 PM
#6
  • SRNewb
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(04-05-2015, 02:35 AM)LookingGlass Wrote: Good question.  I have found over the years that the paper used in most Bibles does not lend itself to fountain pens...too thin.  I like to use a .5mm pencil.  Allows me to print notes in the usually small spaces and erase any mistakes.

Ed
Ed, thanks. 
I preach from time to time. The notes I make in the margins, scripture references, etc., often allow me to preach "on the fly", so to speak, with minimal time spent in study. This is usually to be avoided. But when there is an emergency, and our Pastor at the last moment cannot make it, it falls to me. I usually have several sermon outlines ready in my bible to begin with, but those notations and references are invaluable at certain times. So I want them in a permanent state.

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 05-09-2015, 09:38 AM
#7
  • SRNewb
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Thought i would update this thread.
I bought a Bulow X30 on clearance at xfountainpens. It is a Fine Nib, and I did a review here.

http://fpgeeks.com/forum/showthread.php/...mpressions

It is an excellent tool for this purpose. The Fine nib allows fine detail and small entries. There is little to no bleedthrough, at least no more than I am accustomed to with ballpoints.
The one drawback is that you must make certain that you write with a light hand(no problem with this pen) and that you have several pages underneath the page you are writing on to avoid punching through the paper. Once again, this is no different than my experiences with a ballpoint, or any other writing instrument when using such thin paper.
IMO it works well. Thanks for all of the advice. Much appreciated.

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 05-09-2015, 10:45 AM
#8
  • freddy
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  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Congratulations, Mike.  I'm glad you found something that works for you.  That Chesterfield Ancient Copper is a beautiful color.  It is my understanding that Chesterfield inks are rebranded Diamine inks, a favorite brand of mine.  Will you be using the Chesterfield Ancient Copper in your Bible?

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