03-05-2012, 03:56 AM
#1
User Info
In my "Introductions" post I replied to Andrewjs who lives in Philly. I grew up in the suburbs there and mention food items that I miss now that I live in NH.

Philly has:
cheesesteaks. So much better than any where else I've visited.
TastyKakes - small individual snack cakes similar to Hosstess except they actually taste good.
Soft pretzels. Big warm soft and chewy with just the right amount of salt.
Scrapple. A breakfast meat of pork bits, spices and cornmeal formed into a loaf. You slice a thin piece and pan fry it. Great with eggs.
Goldenberg peanut chews. A dark chocolate candy bar made with nuts and molasses.
Hoagies. What the rest of the world calls a sub. Except for the name not much different than the sandwhiches I get elsewhere. But for some reason they taste better. Back home.
Birch beer soda. Like rootbeer but less sweet.

So how about you? What foods are famous in your neck of the woods?

Phil

7 363
Reply
 03-05-2012, 05:37 AM
#2
User Info
Cuban sandwiches, deviled crab, key lime pie. Cuban sandwiches are made with cuban bread which if you don't live in Tampa or Miami you won't be able to get, and deviled crabs are a delicacy that originated in Tampa's Ybor City.

0 372
Reply
 03-05-2012, 09:44 AM
#3
User Info
God, I LOVE a good soft pretzel. Sam's Club, of all places has good ones. Best one I've ever had was from a street vendor in Chicago.
Kentucky:

Burgoo - chili/stew/soup
Hot brown - look it up
Fried chicken (not KFC, either)
a regional style of barbecue
derby pie
Cincinnati chili
Bourbon
Ale-8-one
Mint julep
Goetta

3 41
Reply
 03-05-2012, 10:00 AM
#4
User Info
(03-05-2012, 03:56 AM)PhilNH5 Wrote: In my "Introductions" post I replied to Andrewjs who lives in Philly. I grew up in the suburbs there and mention food items that I miss now that I live in NH.

Philly has:
cheesesteaks. So much better than any where else I've visited.
TastyKakes - small individual snack cakes similar to Hosstess except they actually taste good.
Soft pretzels. Big warm soft and chewy with just the right amount of salt.
Scrapple. A breakfast meat of pork bits, spices and cornmeal formed into a loaf. You slice a thin piece and pan fry it. Great with eggs.
Goldenberg peanut chews. A dark chocolate candy bar made with nuts and molasses.
Hoagies. What the rest of the world calls a sub. Except for the name not much different than the sandwhiches I get elsewhere. But for some reason they taste better. Back home.
Birch beer soda. Like rootbeer but less sweet.

So how about you? What foods are famous in your neck of the woods?

Phil

dude, you're making me hungry!!!!

I've never tried those goldenberg peanut chews yet. it's funny you mentioned them because I just saw a commercial for their product last night on a show I recorded.

as for hoagies, I like this little spot outside the city in a town I was living in for 2 years. for cheese steaks? I'm not very fond on the typical place people think of when thinking of the city or visiting: geno's or pat's. I like Phillip's steaks which is a few blocks away, IIRC.

40 5,830
Reply
 03-05-2012, 05:48 PM
#5
  • slantman
  • Expert Shaver
  • Leesburg, Florida
User Info
I am also getting hungry reading this. Regarding Goldenbergs Peanut Chews.
They have been around for decades and very hard to get in a lot of areas.
One restaurant chain that sells a lot of the old time candy is The Cracker Barrel. And the biggest fade today is sweet and salty which is really nothing new. As a kid a great sweet and salty combination was a pretzel and drinking a malted. That was fantastic.

100 12,442
Reply
 03-05-2012, 06:26 PM
#6
  • vuk
  • Senior Member
  • Virginia
User Info
by me its:
half-smokes
peanut soup
blue crab
a lot of small wineries around here also

2 503
Reply
 03-06-2012, 04:09 AM
#7
User Info
(03-05-2012, 06:26 PM)vuk Wrote: by me its:
half-smokes
peanut soup
blue crab
a lot of small wineries around here also

never had peanut soup, I'm wondering how that would taste!

40 5,830
Reply
 03-06-2012, 07:45 AM
#8
  • Tonality
  • Attempted Soap Sabbatical
  • Boston
User Info
As a recent transplant to New Mexico from the Northwest, I very soon realized that people down here are all about their green chilies. Whenever I go back home though I try to eat as much seafood as I can handle, especially soaked salmon!

35 1,732
Reply
 03-06-2012, 09:23 AM
#9
  • function
  • lavendarian
  • Houston, Texas, US
User Info
The roasted NM green chile is a wonderful thing.
My home of Pittsburgh boasts some quirky delights, first is the perfected sandwich. Originated at Primanti Bros it was a convenience food where a normal hot sandwich (roast beef, corned beef, blt etc) had the fried and the side of coleslaw placed between the slices of bread. The point was the whole meal in the sandwich so truckers could grab it and eat with one hand while driving to get the next load.
Pittsburgh also features a number of eastern European traditions with the forefront being the Pierogi, many pizza shops even use it as an inredient

0 18
Reply
 03-06-2012, 02:04 PM
#10
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
User Info
For me (born and reared in Brooklyn so that is my reference) it's:

a kosher hot dog on a bun with mustard and sauerkraut
thin crust Brooklyn pizza
Charlotte Russe
Jewish rye bread, fresh from the baker's oven (and just about non-existent today)
egg cream
coffee malted

2 11,211
Reply
 03-06-2012, 02:41 PM
#11
User Info
God love you Geno. RIP

I once drove by, double parked for his food, and that man was there.

http://www.genosteaks.com/

Locally, it's Thurman's cafe in German Village for their burgers. Yeah, we have a lot of the high end stuff. We're just losing a lot of diner food.

http://www.thethurmancafe.com/

2 546
Reply
 03-06-2012, 09:34 PM
#12
User Info
(03-06-2012, 09:23 AM)function Wrote: The roasted NM green chile is a wonderful thing.
My home of Pittsburgh boasts some quirky delights, first is the perfected sandwich. Originated at Primanti Bros it was a convenience food where a normal hot sandwich (roast beef, corned beef, blt etc) had the fried and the side of coleslaw placed between the slices of bread. The point was the whole meal in the sandwich so truckers could grab it and eat with one hand while driving to get the next load.
Pittsburgh also features a number of eastern European traditions with the forefront being the Pierogi, many pizza shops even use it as an inredient

I tried a primanti bros sandwich two years ago when I was out there and I wasn't impressed at all.

(03-06-2012, 02:04 PM)freddy Wrote: For me (born and reared in Brooklyn so that is my reference) it's:

a kosher hot dog on a bun with mustard and sauerkraut
thin crust Brooklyn pizza
Charlotte Russe
Jewish rye bread, fresh from the baker's oven (and just about non-existent today)
egg cream
coffee malted

do you still have a thick Brooklyn accent?

I know a lady from Brooklyn and that accent...wow!

(03-06-2012, 02:41 PM)PanchoVilla Wrote: God love you Geno. RIP

I once drove by, double parked for his food, and that man was there.

http://www.genosteaks.com/

Locally, it's Thurman's cafe in German Village for their burgers. Yeah, we have a lot of the high end stuff. We're just losing a lot of diner food.

http://www.thethurmancafe.com/

the wait alone at Geno's makes me go to other places for a good steak.

40 5,830
Reply
 03-06-2012, 11:24 PM
#13
  • freddy
  • Senior Member
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
User Info
Andrew, my accent will be for you to decide, if you ever hear it. Although I left Brooklyn in 1968, at the age of 22, I spent the next seven years in Toledo, Ohio and have lived more than half of my life in San Diego.

When I was living in Toledo I would go back to Brooklyn for holidays and my family and friends said that I sounded like a Midwesterner. My friends in Toledo said I sounded like a New Yorker! I finally just told people that my accent was somewhere over Pittsburgh and moving west. Tongue


2 11,211
Reply
 03-07-2012, 04:11 AM
#14
User Info
I'm with Andrew on this. I had a Pat's steak once. Or rather I had one bite of it once. They use CheeseWhiz!?!? That is in no way a real Philly cheesesteak. Even as a poor college kid 30 years ago I threw the CheezeWhiz imitator away.

A real Philly cheese steak uses real slices of cheese. provolone preferably but American is acceptable. This is placed on top of the shaved steak after the first turning. The meat is tossed and turned a few more times with the large metal
spatula. This allows every morsel of meat to be coated with cheesey gooey goodness.

Then transfer it to an Amarosa hoagie roll and serve.
Mmmmm. Now I made myself hungry

7 363
Reply
 03-07-2012, 01:12 PM
#15
User Info
(03-06-2012, 11:24 PM)freddy Wrote: Andrew, my accent will be for you to decide, if you ever hear it. Although I left Brooklyn in 1968, at the age of 22, I spent the next seven years in Toledo, Ohio and have lived more than half of my life in San Diego.

When I was living in Toledo I would go back to Brooklyn for holidays and my family and friends said that I sounded like a Midwesterner. My friends in Toledo said I sounded like a New Yorker! I finally just told people that my accent was somewhere over Pittsburgh and moving west. Tongue

maybe someday we'll meet up and grab some food!

(03-07-2012, 04:11 AM)PhilNH5 Wrote: I'm with Andrew on this. I had a Pat's steak once. Or rather I had one bite of it once. They use CheeseWhiz!?!? That is in no way a real Philly cheesesteak. Even as a poor college kid 30 years ago I threw the CheezeWhiz imitator away.

A real Philly cheese steak uses real slices of cheese. provolone preferably but American is acceptable. This is placed on top of the shaved steak after the first turning. The meat is tossed and turned a few more times with the large metal
spatula. This allows every morsel of meat to be coated with cheesey gooey goodness.

Then transfer it to an Amarosa hoagie roll and serve.
Mmmmm. Now I made myself hungry

I REALLY dislike you right now. Tongue

40 5,830
Reply
 03-07-2012, 01:20 PM
#16
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
User Info
In La-la land, it is wheat grass, alfalfa sprouts and brown rice. I sure do miss Chicago when it comes to great food. Cool

45 16,340
Reply
 03-07-2012, 01:21 PM
#17
User Info
[Image: beef.jpg]
Sorry Phil ; )

[Image: JF2.jpg]

1 77
Reply
 03-07-2012, 01:39 PM
#18
User Info
(03-07-2012, 01:21 PM)40boy Wrote: [Image: beef.jpg]
Sorry Phil ; )

[Image: JF2.jpg]

[Image: _Big_eyes__by_AngelinaHarijau.gif]

2 546
Reply
 03-07-2012, 01:40 PM
#19
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
User Info
Greater El- A has a cornucopia of ethnic foods. The logistical problem is having to drive considerable distance, or to be accurate time to appreciate the great ones. Even our californio slant on mexican food has to fight past Taco Bell mediocrity.
What I miss is San Francisco Sourdough hot from the oven. I love White Castle cheeseburgers from Chitown available frozen. Hamburgers have entered an arms race of size,fancy beefs and toppings. Me like meat,cheese,onion,bun.
The other great insult is pizza. I like Chicago deep dish. The plethora of pizza companies out here just don't do it justice.

2 3,171
Reply
 03-07-2012, 01:41 PM
#20
  • bullgoose
  • The Enabler
  • Redondo Beach, California, U.S.A
User Info
Oh Man! I have not even eaten lunch yet. You are making me hungry and homesick at the same time. Biggrin

45 16,340
Reply
Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)