04-12-2015, 08:38 AM
#1
  • Lradke
  • Senior Member
  • Edmonton, Alberta
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Good morning!

I came across a curious symbol, when doing genealogy work on documents from the 1700-1800's.  I am working on baptism and death records from the United Kingdom and there have been a few names with this symbol in it.  Since there are a few of us here that prefer handwriting, I figured I would ask your input.

Here is a name I am cataloging (under Smith/above Day), from 1756:

[Image: C0u2ei8.png]

From what I can tell the surname is "MacFar?on" (Samuel, Son of Daniel & Elizabeth, the 29th).  I have looked online and found that the backwards looking 'f' is a lower case "h" in historic German records, but that doesn't help as this is from England.  Another source describes it as a 'leading s' for names with the letter s one after another, such as Melissa.  But this name doesn't have the need of a 'leading s'.

Any ideas?  For other names I have seen I thought it was a lower case 'z' as that made sense for the other name that contained it...but this just threw me and has me second guessing.

Thanks!

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 04-12-2015, 08:54 AM
#2
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I believe it is an "s". Mac Farson. JMO  Sherlock

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 04-12-2015, 08:56 AM
#3
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Luke, I always thought it was the lower case letter "s" in an older form but I could be wrong.

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 04-12-2015, 12:15 PM
#4
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I'm agreeing. Looks very much the same as the lower case "s" in some of the handwritten entries in an old bible owned by my family that came to the US from England. The family surname Atkinson contains the lower case letter.

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 04-12-2015, 04:09 PM
#5
  • Lradke
  • Senior Member
  • Edmonton, Alberta
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Thanks for the help! I really appreciate it.  Looking at the other records, I agree with your insight that it is a lower case 's'.

Thanks again for the help and teaching me something new! Smile

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 04-12-2015, 05:27 PM
#6
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Looks like you're an indexer! I used to do indexing years ago. Thanks for contributing to the work!

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 04-19-2015, 06:30 PM
#7
  • MaxP
  • Senior Member
  • Madison, WI
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Thanks to all who do indexing. I've benefited from it. Its a good work.

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 04-19-2015, 10:44 PM
#8
  • Shaun
  • Senior Member
  • St Peters, NSW, Australia
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I think it may be a nascent form of "MacPherson"

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 04-20-2015, 01:12 PM
#9
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(04-19-2015, 06:30 PM)MaxP Wrote: Thanks to all who do indexing.  I've benefited from it.  Its a good work.

agreed!

I love using family search, mostly because it's free!  I even got my mom interested in looking stuff up for our family tree!!!

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 04-20-2015, 09:01 PM
#10
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Now, this was fascinating! I had never seen this before or even heard of this. Good luck with the work, Luke!  Smile

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 05-19-2015, 10:56 AM
#11
  • Lradke
  • Senior Member
  • Edmonton, Alberta
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Thank you everyone!

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 11-01-2015, 11:52 AM
#12
  • Amzimbo
  • Smooth as a fresh shaven diplomat
  • New Jersey and Mozambique
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This looks like the so-called schafus s. Used in German to represent a double s. In older English just a variant on s.

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