04-14-2015, 05:34 PM
#1
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How do you guys do it?. I've seen some videos of guys who never splay the brush but others where guys do. Do you get more soap on the tips without splaying it out?. It appears you would but who knows.


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 04-14-2015, 05:51 PM
#2
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I don't splay, personally. I'd be concerned that I'd be applying a bit too much torque to the bristles. I think that might be what brush manufacturers are worried about they warn about loading in a circular fashion. I haven't really tested that theory however.

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 04-14-2015, 06:18 PM
#3
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I have been lightly splaying my brushes when I load soap for almost four years, now, and I have yet to see any issues with them. Again, I do it fairly gently, and I don't really see any better way to do it unless you use a cream or a shave-stick. 
Depending on how much lather you want would also be a contributing factor as if you only desire a very thin layer of soap in your passes, you wouldn't necessarily need to splay the brush. It would also depend on the type of soap you were using as harder soaps or triple-milled soaps would require more loading time and splaying might facilitate the process.
Nonetheless, this is a subjective view and you should do what you think is best for your brushes. 

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 04-14-2015, 06:55 PM
#4
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Light splaying is also what I do. I don't mash them into the puck. I also have no shame in going back to get more soap if needed. All of my brushes are in great shape, no broken bristles. I definitely don't baby my brushes, but I don't abuse them either. Just use common sense ?

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 04-14-2015, 06:56 PM
#5
  • BobH
  • Senior Member
  • Thunder Bay Canada
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With hard soaps I splay the brush a bit and load with a circular motion for a decent length of time in order to get enough soap for all the passes I will be doing. For a soft soaps I use a much gentler circular motion to load. Been face lathering all my life using both painting and circular motions to build and spread the lather. I don't mash the brush flat but use just enough pressure to splay the knot. Oth like the above post you have to do what you think is best your brushes.

Bob

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 04-14-2015, 07:21 PM
#6
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I do what Bob does. I also add water fairly frequently to reduce the friction and "pull" on the fibers as the paste thickens.

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 04-14-2015, 08:18 PM
#7
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(04-14-2015, 06:56 PM)BobH Wrote: With hard soaps I splay the brush a bit and load with a circular motion for a decent length of time in order to get enough soap for all the passes I will be doing. For a soft soaps I use a much gentler circular motion to load. Been face lathering all my life using both painting and circular motions to build and spread the lather. I don't mash the brush flat but use just enough pressure to splay the knot. Oth like the above post you have to do what you think is best your brushes.

Bob

+1 - do it exactly like Bob does.

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 04-15-2015, 06:25 PM
#8
  • Deuce
  • Just a guy
  • Cave Creek
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When I got my Plisson, the Planete Rasoir manager suggested I cradle the knot between my thumb, fore and mid fingers. He said the knot being natural fibers would degrade naturally, and this technique would prolong its life. 2 of my badgers are flat tops, and you don't need to splay the bristles with this type brush. 

My synths splay , as I figure they can take a beating. The Grooming Company brush loft is set so it is denser, while the Plisson synth is much less dense. I don't think it really matters with this family of brushes

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 04-23-2015, 07:38 AM
#9
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I try to just press hard enough to make my bristles flex. Not splay out wide, but not just lightly brushing, either. A bit of flex insures solid contact with the soap, but most of the loading is still happening at the tips.

Another thing that really helped me was to stop loading based on time or number of swirls. I got comfortable with the amount of soap I should see loaded on the ends of the brush, and I just check it after a time to see if I'm there or not. I think I'm wasting less soap that way.

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 04-23-2015, 08:23 AM
#10
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(04-14-2015, 07:21 PM)ShadowsDad Wrote: I do what Bob does. I also add water fairly frequently to reduce the friction and "pull" on the fibers as the paste thickens.

Same here, I add water and let the bristles suck up the proto lather. 

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 04-23-2015, 02:12 PM
#11
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The rule of thumb I use and recommend to customers is to depress/flex the bristles only about 1/4 of the way down when loading (and lathering, for that matter) adding water as necessary to create a kind of rubbery "goo."  That may be similar to what you're doing, but I like to be a bit more specific simply because I have no idea how experienced the other person might be.

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 04-23-2015, 02:31 PM
#12
  • eengler
  • Administrator
  • South Dakota, USA
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(04-23-2015, 02:12 PM)BSWoodturning Wrote: The rule of thumb I use and recommend to customers is to depress/flex the bristles only about 1/4 of the way down when loading.

The 1/4 guideline has worked well for my brushes. I am a swirler however no matter the brush.

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 04-24-2015, 04:59 PM
#13
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No, I do not splay my badger brushes.

It's just goes against my grain to mush a beautiful brush when you don't have to.

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 04-28-2015, 09:36 AM
#14
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For soft creams I add a little hot water to the cream right before I shave and then remove the water and lather up. Works great with no real pressure on the brush. For hard soaps, I take the hot water my brush is soaking in and just cover the top of the puck. I take my shower and when I come out I remove the water and the soap has softened up enough that you just use a couple of circular passes and you have more then enough soap on the brush. If the soap is really hard, I use a brush with firmer bristles to take the soap out.

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