06-12-2012, 08:05 PM
#1
  • Tonality
  • Attempted Soap Sabbatical
  • Boston
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We just had our first tornado warning since moving to eastern New Mexico! Having moved from Western Washington this was the girlfriend and I's first experience with tornados, so the most we ever had to survive were earthquakes. We live in a brick house, so I felt somewhat secure, but we still went to the neighbors and rode out the storm with some beers and conversation. We only experenced some major rain and quarter sized hail, but the fear factor was still there. According to the news, a tornado did touch down 12 miles outside of town and there were reports of softball sized hail. We still have a light show like display of lightning all round, but wind and hail has died down.

Overall, I must say a rather exciting experience with a little fear due to lack of experience. Anyone else have tornado close call stories?

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 06-12-2012, 08:11 PM
#2
  • uncledave
  • Returned to DE Shaving After 40 years
  • Kentucky, USA
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(06-12-2012, 08:05 PM)Tonality Wrote: We just had our first tornado warning since moving to eastern New Mexico! Having moved from Western Washington this was the girlfriend and I's first experience with tornados, so the most we ever had to survive were earthquakes. We live in a brick house, so I felt somewhat secure, but we still went to the neighbors and rode out the storm with some beers and conversation. We only experenced some major rain and quarter sized hail, but the fear factor was still there. According to the news, a tornado did touch down 12 miles outside of town and there were reports of softball sized hail. We still have a light show like display of lightning all round, but wind and hail has died down.

Overall, I must say a rather exciting experience with a little fear due to lack of experience. Anyone else have tornado close call stories?

They are very scary. In 1974 there were a couple of hundred tornadoes that occurred in the South in a 2 day period. I was living in Nashville, TN in a subdivision at the time. One touched down one block away. I heard a loud noise, looked out the patio door and there it was. I was paralysed and just stood looking at it before I had sense enough to head for the bathroom. It went one street down and a block or so over and blew five brick homes that were under construction to rubble. I hope never to see anything like that again.

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 06-12-2012, 08:23 PM
#3
  • gijames
  • Mile High Soldier
  • TN, USA
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Tornadoes are no friend of mine,

I grew up in Denver, which usually had hail storms and high winds, lots of lightning, but thankfully most the tornadoes that did touch down were very small. most damage came from hail and high winds.

As the metro area has grown out there, many more people are now getting hit by smaller touchdowns.

My first experience with tornadoes of large caliber came when I was stationed at Fort Leavenworth, KS... THAT was some scary S###! scared for life from those few years out that way.

Went to Bethesda, MD for duty, and Tornadoes were not as common. Then I separated from the service after 11 years, and ended up here just east of Memphis, TN... so now I am in a corner that gets pelted by warnings all the time during april, may and parts of june... and then again in september and october. Of course , the biggest thing to watch is air density and temperature... without watching tv, I can tell when the wicked storms are getting ready to roll through, and I am on edge for a few hours....

perhaps the air sirens in Rihad,SA didn't help me much (S.C.U.D launches from Iraq).. i may be a bit more sensitive to LOUD sirens screaming through the night air...

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 06-12-2012, 08:24 PM
#4
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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I've been through four or five in my day. Nothing replaces either a storm shelter or a basement for personal protection.

That brick house means nothing to a category 3, 4, or 5 tornado.

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 06-12-2012, 08:27 PM
#5
  • Harvey
  • Senior Member
  • North Hills CA
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Try a few 5 plus earthquakes for a real feeling of " Hi Lord ..here I come"...ready or not scares the heck out of you

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 06-12-2012, 08:36 PM
#6
  • Tonality
  • Attempted Soap Sabbatical
  • Boston
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(06-12-2012, 08:27 PM)Harvey Wrote: Try a few 5 plus earthquakes for a real feeling of " Hi Lord ..here I come"...ready or not scares the heck out of you

I experience one 6.2 earthquake back in 2001 in Washington, definitely a scary experience.

@ Johnny, luckily around here I'm told they never get higher than a 2.

Interesting stories so far, I hope I never have to experience anything more than tonight!

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 06-12-2012, 09:29 PM
#7
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(06-12-2012, 08:11 PM)uncledave Wrote:
(06-12-2012, 08:05 PM)Tonality Wrote: We just had our first tornado warning since moving to eastern New Mexico! Having moved from Western Washington this was the girlfriend and I's first experience with tornados, so the most we ever had to survive were earthquakes. We live in a brick house, so I felt somewhat secure, but we still went to the neighbors and rode out the storm with some beers and conversation. We only experenced some major rain and quarter sized hail, but the fear factor was still there. According to the news, a tornado did touch down 12 miles outside of town and there were reports of softball sized hail. We still have a light show like display of lightning all round, but wind and hail has died down.

Overall, I must say a rather exciting experience with a little fear due to lack of experience. Anyone else have tornado close call stories?

They are very scary. In 1974 there were a couple of hundred tornadoes that occurred in the South in a 2 day period. I was living in Nashville, TN in a subdivision at the time. One touched down one block away. I heard a loud noise, looked out the patio door and there it was. I was paralysed and just stood looking at it before I had sense enough to head for the bathroom. It went one street down and a block or so over and blew five brick homes that were under construction to rubble. I hope never to see anything like that again.

I live in the Nashville area and I remember that night in 1974 very well. I was 13 and scared to death. One of the largest tornado outbreaks in history. I believe Ohio got hit pretty hard too.

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 06-12-2012, 10:24 PM
#8
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Not a tornado experience... in Maine I'm told we (statistically) get 2 F1s per year.

Anyway, many years ago we had a devilwind come through. It was enough to lift 2x4s, tarps, etc., and that was enough for me. You all can have them. I saw it happen from 15 yards away and that was plenty! I don't even want an F1. Generally our ground is pretty stable w/o any S-waves either. I kinda like that too.

I'll trade both of those negatives and accept the guaranteed cold and snow of winter that we get.

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 06-12-2012, 11:07 PM
#9
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Glad to hear your alright amigo!
Next time you get a warning send your shave stuff here where it will be safe. LOL

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 06-12-2012, 11:30 PM
#10
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(06-12-2012, 08:36 PM)Tonality Wrote:
(06-12-2012, 08:27 PM)Harvey Wrote: Try a few 5 plus earthquakes for a real feeling of " Hi Lord ..here I come"...ready or not scares the heck out of you

I experience one 6.2 earthquake back in 2001 in Washington, definitely a scary experience.

@ Johnny, luckily around here I'm told they never get higher than a 2.

Interesting stories so far, I hope I never have to experience anything more than tonight!
Dang, that tornado warning must have been freaky. But in New Mexico? I thought they did not have tornadoes there. That must make it doubly freaky. Glad you are OK, though,

California doesn't get too many tornadoes, but 14 years ago this F2 passed near where I worked. We were very near an airport, so I thought it was a jet at first. There were two or three other tornadoes in the area that day.

   

As the tornado descended, one brave soul stood directly underneath and snapped photos straight up the funnel.

Earthquakes are generally no big deal, even the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, which measured 6.9 and also affected the area hit by the above tornado, was nowhere near as bad as it was made to look on TV. Duck under a table or desk and all will usually be well. It was a rather scary while it was happening, though.

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 06-13-2012, 07:51 AM
#11
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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(06-12-2012, 08:36 PM)Tonality Wrote: @ Johnny, luckily around here I'm told they never get higher than a 2.

If your setting at home and know an F2 is headed for your brick home, do one of two things, run or take cover. An F2 at a minimum will blow out your windows and at a maximum take off your roof.

I was in a storm shelter a few years back when the big F5 tore through Moore, Oklahoma. Not something I ever want to experience again.

I was also in Joplin last year three days after that F5 leveled everything doing some relief work with a church group. Devastating is the only way you can describe it.

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 06-13-2012, 08:53 AM
#12
  • slantman
  • Expert Shaver
  • Leesburg, Florida
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You have to have some type of luck regarding tornadoes, earthquakes and my favorite hurricanes. Living in Florida 38 years we have experienced many big time hurricanes and some tornadoes. No fun at all.

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 06-13-2012, 12:12 PM
#13
  • Persius
  • On the learning curve
  • Reading, England
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It is nice an safe here in the UK - no real twisters (that you'd consider worthy of the name).. I'll just share your experiences if you don't mind. A litlle snow is considered extreme here!

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 06-13-2012, 02:27 PM
#14
  • Philbo
  • Member
  • West Midlands, UK
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(06-13-2012, 12:12 PM)Persius Wrote: It is nice an safe here in the UK - no real twisters (that you'd consider worthy of the name).. I'll just share your experiences if you don't mind. A litlle snow is considered extreme here!

We are very lucky here in the UK.....an inch of snow grinds the country to a halt!

I remember a few years back I think it was, when what the media were calling a Tornado ripped a roof or two off a few houses in Birmingham.......comical compared to what you see and hear about across the pond.

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 06-13-2012, 04:48 PM
#15
  • uncledave
  • Returned to DE Shaving After 40 years
  • Kentucky, USA
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(06-12-2012, 09:29 PM)CyanideMetal Wrote:
(06-12-2012, 08:11 PM)uncledave Wrote:
(06-12-2012, 08:05 PM)Tonality Wrote: We just had our first tornado warning since moving to eastern New Mexico! Having moved from Western Washington this was the girlfriend and I's first experience with tornados, so the most we ever had to survive were earthquakes. We live in a brick house, so I felt somewhat secure, but we still went to the neighbors and rode out the storm with some beers and conversation. We only experenced some major rain and quarter sized hail, but the fear factor was still there. According to the news, a tornado did touch down 12 miles outside of town and there were reports of softball sized hail. We still have a light show like display of lightning all round, but wind and hail has died down.

Overall, I must say a rather exciting experience with a little fear due to lack of experience. Anyone else have tornado close call stories?

They are very scary. In 1974 there were a couple of hundred tornadoes that occurred in the South in a 2 day period. I was living in Nashville, TN in a subdivision at the time. One touched down one block away. I heard a loud noise, looked out the patio door and there it was. I was paralysed and just stood looking at it before I had sense enough to head for the bathroom. It went one street down and a block or so over and blew five brick homes that were under construction to rubble. I hope never to see anything like that again.

I live in the Nashville area and I remember that night in 1974 very well. I was 13 and scared to death. One of the largest tornado outbreaks in history. I believe Ohio got hit pretty hard too.

It was a scary night for sure. The one I saw, after it tore up the homes in my subdivision actually divided into two tornadoes joined at the tips. Then it went back up into the sky, crossed over the city of Nashville, and did some more damage on the other side. To this day I have dreams of having to run from tornadoes.
I even remember the exact date: April 4, 1974. Thankfully I've never seen another one.

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 06-13-2012, 06:14 PM
#16
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(06-12-2012, 11:30 PM)Tbone Wrote: Dang, that tornado warning must have been freaky. But in New Mexico? I thought they did not have tornadoes there. That must make it doubly freaky. Glad you are OK, though,

As the tornado descended, one brave soul stood directly underneath and snapped photos straight up the funnel.

Earthquakes are generally no big deal,

Oh Yes. Eastern New Mexico is still in tornado alley. I lived in Lubbock, Texas, which is not far from the New Mexico border. Many wicked and blinding dust storms, dust devils and yes, tornadoes. Brick will not save you at all if the tornado is large enough.

Lubbock suffered a catastrophic tornado in 1970, killing ten people, if my memory of the article serves me. I did not live there at the time. Hundreds of homes were blown to pieces. And yet, almost every house after 1970 in Lubbock was built on concrete slabs. I never could understand that.

I grew up in Missouri where tornadoes and basements were pretty standard fare. Once, when I was 10 years old, my sister and I were getting off the school bus when a tornado touched down less than an eighth of a mile from our apartment, which incidently did not have a basement. I can remember we lived upstairs on the second floor, and first, we ran up there, we opened up all the windows then ran real fast downstairs to the laundry room without windows on the ground level. I will never forget the incredibly loud sound, the loudest train EVER, and how scared we were. I will never forget how heavy the laundry room door was to pull shut...trying to move it against that force. We were yelling and scared and crying. I'll never forget it.

Then decades later in Lubbock, I treated a man who had been out in his cotton field and a dust devil caught him. Picked him up, landed on his hip and broke it and two ribs. He said at first he kind of thought it was fun...but then it dropped him so fast he didn't know what happened. Likely, he was the only person who even saw the dust devil...things are so spread out there. Well, it is Texas afterall. I used to tease him and tell him it was the hooch he was drinking, yeah, yeah, dust devil, right...

And...I survived the Northridge quake and the Painted Cave fire. (Though one item of mine was lost in that fire...but THAT is another story.) No hurricanes or tsunami's have I experienced.

Tonality..glad you are OK. That's the main thing.

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