05-08-2015, 06:18 PM
#1
  • ncguy1
  • TARHEEL
  • North Carolina
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It doesn't seem that long ago but I guess it was back in 06 or 07 I bought a new Canon Rebel XTi(400D) from Best Buy. I think when it first came out I paid around $900 to $1000 for it.  The same camera now goes for about $150-$200.  Sad   I originally bought it to take pics of my 350gal reef tank system/money pit but as with a lot of things,I end up not using it after the "newness" wears off. I never really learned how to use the camera in any mode other than auto so I don't know what it's full potential really is.

  I've got a Canon EF 18-55 lens,Tamron 70-300 lens and Ravelli tripod but I'm not sure if any of this is good or bad.  So is this camera outdated or too far behind the times so to speak or will I still be able to take pics anywhere close to as good as some of the SOTD pics that a lot of you take?

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 05-08-2015, 06:26 PM
#2
  • eengler
  • Administrator
  • South Dakota, USA
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I say keep shooting with it and get to know that camera better. Try using it in aperture mode at the different apertures. Play with the depth of field and shooting at different focal lengths. I think that camera has the ability make great photographs. Good luck and keep shooting lots of pics!

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 05-08-2015, 08:48 PM
#3
  • ncguy1
  • TARHEEL
  • North Carolina
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Yeah it's not as easy as some of you make it look. I've tried reading some photography websites for help but they seem to be in some kind of foreign language.They said things like "Oh just set your ISO speed and use aperture priority but change your f number to a higher rate." "Then choose a shutter speed and depending on your focal length and exposure rate you may need to change the f-stop number"
A6

Uhhhh yeah no problem at all.   Huh

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 05-08-2015, 08:49 PM
#4
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I think you ought to throw away that vintage razor you own because it is too outdated.

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 05-08-2015, 08:52 PM
#5
  • ncguy1
  • TARHEEL
  • North Carolina
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(05-08-2015, 08:49 PM)fram773 Wrote: I think you ought to throw away that vintage razor you own because it is too outdated.

Now that's just crazy talk there lol

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 05-08-2015, 09:29 PM
#6
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(05-08-2015, 08:49 PM)fram773 Wrote: I think you ought to throw away that vintage razor you own because it is too outdated.

Biggrin

In all seriousness, I agree with Ed and you should start taking photos with it and playing around with the settings. It isn't as difficult as it seems, but it does take practice. 
How long did it take you to get great shaves? Practice, practice, practice!  Biggrin
Give it a try for a few weeks to see what happens. I would suggest using it on 'manual' mode and playing around with the settings to see how your photos turn out or to keep it simple, keep it in 'auto' mode. 
There are a few videos on YouTube that could assist you with learning how to use your camera:  

Good luck. 

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 05-09-2015, 01:00 AM
#7
  • BobH
  • Senior Member
  • Thunder Bay Canada
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Out dated is a state of mind when it comes to cameras and their ability to take good photos. People are still using 70 year old Leica film cameras and turning out good photos. So no I don't think your camera is obsolete at all. Do things like set your camera on Aperture priority mode and shoot the same object at different f stops to see what changing the f stop does to the photo as an example. Practice and try different things.

Bob

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 05-09-2015, 10:11 AM
#8
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Just my own personal view on these things and a lot of people think the same way, the marketing forces are at play making you think the more expensive your camera the better photographs will be not so and very far from the truth, I now shoot with a compact a Nikon 1 and in all honesty it takes pictures as good as my both Nikon DSLR camera's so much so that I sold both.

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 05-09-2015, 11:07 AM
#9
  • ncguy1
  • TARHEEL
  • North Carolina
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By outdated I mean is my camera behind as far as it's software capabilities or things that newer cameras have that mine doesn't.  I used to have a 133 mhz computer and while it would still work it is really behind newer computers.

I just wasn't sure if my camera was missing anything that I may need.  I know it's only 10.1 megapixels and now some cell phones have more than that. But then again I'm not sure if megapixels even matter that much.

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 05-09-2015, 11:09 AM
#10
  • freddy
  • Banned
  • San Diego, California, U.S.A.
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Tim, I know where you are coming from but, as others have stated, just play with the settings and practice a bit.  The best things about digital cameras are 1) you don't waste film by taking a bad photograph and 2) you get instant feedback to see what you have done right or wrong.  Your camera is most definitely not out of date.  It may have a few less bells and whistles but that should only make it easier to learn the ones you already have. 

I have this app on my Samsung Galaxy S5 phone and really like it: http://www.elementsofphotography.com.  It is also available for both the iPhone and the iPad.  It will be either free or inexpensive.  I am finding it quite helpful and the app is done in a way that makes it pleasant to read and use.  Good luck to you. Thumbsup

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 05-09-2015, 11:11 AM
#11
  • ncguy1
  • TARHEEL
  • North Carolina
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One thing I found out by messing around with some settings is that even in a fairly dark room,I can change the shutter speed or f-stop to allow the shutter to stay open longer "to gather light I guess" and the pic turns out looking like the room had plenty of light. This is pretty nice.

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 05-09-2015, 11:14 AM
#12
  • ncguy1
  • TARHEEL
  • North Carolina
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(05-09-2015, 11:09 AM)freddy Wrote: http://www.elementsofphotography.com.

Alrighty I'll check it out

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 05-09-2015, 11:15 AM
#13
  • CRAusmus
  • Senior Member
  • Going from Texas to Georgia
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If you are in Aperture Priority you don't have to worry about any other settings.  The smaller the number the shorter your depth of field (how much of the scene is in focus and how much isn't) the higher the number the deeper your depth of field.

As far as ISO goes, I always try and shoot as low as I possibly can, but that comes from an old school film mentality.  I still adhere to it, but I just can't shake that mindset.  Back in the day we used to shoot film in speeds of 25 and 50 to get the tightest grain possible.  These days you can push your ISO much higher.  I see pros shooting in the 1000-2000 range which in film was just unheard of because it would look terrible because the grain would be all you would see.  So if you hovered around 400-800 with your camera you could get pretty good results in decent lighting.

Other than that your shutter speed is chosen for you based on your f-stop (aperture).  Open the lens up (make the number smaller) for faster shutter speeds (keep in mind this will compress your depth of field), and close your lens down (make the number larger) to slow the shutter speed down.

The whole time I was shooting film I always shot in either Aperture Priority or Shutter Priority, unless I was in the studio where I could use a meter.  I shot AP for portraits and scenics, and shot SP for sports and action.

Once you get a feel for it, you'll know where you like to shoot at.  If you are having trouble hitting the shutter speed you want to be at with the depth you are looking for, bump your ISO up or down to bring it around.  The beauty of digital is it doesn't cost you anything to experiment.  You can shoot as many shots of the same scene you want and vary the settings as much as you want to see how the controls work and change the way your camera sees the scene.  And it doesn't matter what you are shooting.  It can be the glass of wine you're drinking or your shave gear or your wife's rose bushes.  Every shot extends your knowledge of the art, and that makes every shot worthwhile no matter what the subject matter is.  The more you experiment the more you will learn.  Above all have fun.

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 05-09-2015, 11:30 AM
#14
  • ncguy1
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  • North Carolina
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(05-09-2015, 11:15 AM)CRAusmus Wrote: If you are in Aperture Priority you don't have to worry about any other settings.

That's what eengler was saying too.   Looking through the settings there is soooo many things to learn about.  White balance and Metering and it goes on and on.


I'll stick with AP until I get the hang of it. I am determined to be able to take better pictures and not give up this time.

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 05-09-2015, 11:50 AM
#15
  • greyhawk
  • Senior Member
  • Southern California
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Your camera won't be outdated until you explore all of its capabilities, master them, and find that new cameras offer something the old camera doesn't. It doesn't appear that that is the case yet.

Learn how to use this camera fully. By the time you are ready for a new one, there will be new models with even greater feature sets than are available now, and they will likely be cheaper.

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 05-09-2015, 12:09 PM
#16
  • jb74
  • Member
  • Ireland
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It's not the camera, it's the photo.

There is no such thing as out of date. 

I shoot with cameras from the 1920s through to modern day digital cameras. 

Taken with my Canon 350D (Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT) in 2007.. I love this photo.

[Image: 2044055993_ac6fe3479e.jpg]

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 05-09-2015, 12:13 PM
#17
  • ncguy1
  • TARHEEL
  • North Carolina
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That's a great photo John!

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 05-09-2015, 12:19 PM
#18
  • eengler
  • Administrator
  • South Dakota, USA
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Tim, as you get shooting feel free to ask specific questions or post a pic and describe what you are trying to achieve. I would be happy to help as well as others I'm sure.

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 05-09-2015, 12:22 PM
#19
  • ncguy1
  • TARHEEL
  • North Carolina
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(05-09-2015, 12:19 PM)eengler Wrote: Tim, as you get shooting feel free to ask specific questions or post a pic and describe what you are trying to achieve. I would be happy to help as well as others I'm sure.

Sounds good.  I'm headed out to take some photos now.

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 05-09-2015, 12:26 PM
#20
  • Mel S Meles
  • On the edge, ouch
  • 44.4899° south of the North Pole
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(05-08-2015, 06:18 PM)ncguy1 Wrote: It doesn't seem that long ago but I guess it was back in 06 or 07 I bought a new Canon Rebel XTi(400D) from Best Buy.

  I've got a Canon EF 18-55 lens,Tamron 70-300 lens and Ravelli tripod but I'm not sure if any of this is good or bad.  So is this camera outdated or too far behind the times so to speak or will I still be able to take pics anywhere close to as good as some of the SOTD pics that a lot of you take?

Two conflicting opinions, both mine.   Wink

(1)  In the early 1980's, I purchased for my son, then about ten years old, a used Canonet QL17 GIII rangefinder camera that has a superb fast lens.  Amazingly, you still can purchase  [url=http://www.amazon.com/Canonet-QL17-GIII-G-III-Canon/dp/B007W6N0NE/[/url] one just like it today; but don't:  in 2015,
it truly is outdated.  Reason:  it uses a mercury battery that it now is illegal to sell, and no non-mercury battery currently is made in a size that will fit in its battery compartment.  Without a battery, the QL17 GIII is a brick, useful only as a paperweight.  That is the very, very rare example of a camera that is outdated, full stop.  Most other cameras, those which require no battery, or those for which modern batteries are available, are not outdated.  A pinhole camera (a lightproof box with a pinhole on one side, no lens, and a clip on the inside opposite the pinhole to hold light-sensitive film) never will be outdated as long as light-sensitive film is manufactured, even though it lacks many modern features.  As others have noted here, your present kit has the capability to take excellent photographs, and you can learn a lot about photography specifically by learning to play to its strengths and how to work around whatever limitations the camera may have.

(2)  For eighty percent of the half century that I have been serious about photography, the camera that I carried around was a film SLR that garnered envy from other photographers:  for 24 years, my primary lens was an 85 mm f/1.2 aspherical lens that could shoot pictures of a black cat in a coal mine, resolving every whisker.  I had a second lens, a 35 mm f/2.0, that I carried alongside the camera to swap onto it when I needed a wide field of view.  But towards the end of that span, I carried it less and less often because it was bulky, it was heavy, and it was at risk of theft if I left it unattended; so it stayed at home when I was out in the world where images happened.  When I went digital, just about the time you purchased your Canon Rebel XTi, I went to the other extreme, acquiring
a tiny "point and shoot" camera (a misnomer, because I selected a model with manual controls and that had RAW capability) with a zoom lens; I have upgraded since to a newer tiny camera that also has a zoom lens and extended manual capability.  I don't leave the camera at home nearly as often, and I take a lot more pictures -- but the reason is less the gee-whiz modern new features, and more the easy portability of the kit:  there is no excuse for leaving the camera at home any more.  I foresee that I shall never go back to a heavy, bulky camera, ever.

Resolving the apparent conflict between the two paragraphs above, my synthesis is that your camera IS outdated if you find it a bother to carry around and to use, but it certainly is NOT outdated if you find pleasure in learning how to use the rich features that
a 2007 era Canon Rebel DSLR can offer you.  

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