06-14-2012, 04:07 PM
#1
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I'm just not confident in what I wrote for my interests or hobbies on my résumé.

"Debating current affairs and issues. Drawing interfaces and suggest recommendations based on independent conclusions.
Traveling to rural countries."


I want to make this sound SO much more professional, but clueless on how.

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 06-14-2012, 04:17 PM
#2
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I've been told that adding interests or hobbies to your resume is usually unnecessary.

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 06-14-2012, 04:24 PM
#3
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(06-14-2012, 04:17 PM)Pnume Wrote: I've been told that adding interests or hobbies to your resume is usually unnecessary.

Yep, me too. It may be better to remove that section.

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 06-14-2012, 04:30 PM
#4
  • MaxP
  • Senior Member
  • Madison, WI
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I have reviewed hundreds of resumes over the years. Trust me. Do NOT put hobbies and interests in your resume. It will only provide a reason to eliminate you from further consideration.

Focus on accomplishments.

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 06-14-2012, 05:28 PM
#5
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(06-14-2012, 04:30 PM)MaxP Wrote: I have reviewed hundreds of resumes over the years. Trust me. Do NOT put hobbies and interests in your resume. It will only provide a reason to eliminate you from further consideration.

Focus on accomplishments.

Why? I don't know what to replace it with...

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 06-14-2012, 06:12 PM
#6
  • MaxP
  • Senior Member
  • Madison, WI
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Jon,

You can include a three sentence "elevator pitch" that concisely states who and what you're about.

You can also expand the experience sections to amplify your accomplishments.

Again, DO NOT include anything that will give the screener/reviewer a reason to toss your resume. Screening is a necessary process to get the number of resumes received down to a manageable selection.

I've trash-canned resumes for a single typo.

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 06-14-2012, 06:13 PM
#7
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You can put a ton of headings on a resume. The most effective resumes are those that are efficient. Almost any resume can get by on these headings. Keep it to one page with a separate reference page unless requested or required. If you can't hand it to the person who will be personally interviewing you, make sure you have a short cover letter that will impact the reader.

Objective
Work Experience
Education
Achievements/Accomplishments
References upon request

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 06-14-2012, 10:40 PM
#8
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(06-14-2012, 06:13 PM)GearHead_1 Wrote: You can put a ton of headings on a resume. The most effective resumes are those that are efficient. Almost any resume can get by on these headings. Keep it to one page with a separate reference page unless requested or required. If you can't hand it to the person who will be personally interviewing you, make sure you have a short cover letter that will impact the reader.

Objective
Work Experience
Education
Achievements/Accomplishments
References upon request

I had to REALLY edit my resume up completely. It's hard trying to get everything to fit on one page. I've tried reducing the text size.

I hate having to change my resume around. Hopefully this is for the best. What do you think of this as an achievement?

"I defined product services and a rollout strategy for the operations, developed a business plan and successfully sourced funding, which led to the product being implemented on time and within budget, this also provided complete customer satisfaction and repeat business."

I think that's decent enough, wouldn't you say?

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 06-15-2012, 05:39 AM
#9
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It says a ton. That's the kind of statement I would break into several bullets as each are a different event and demonstrate versatility. Some do and some don't, I use bullet points and no periods.
  • Started New Business, product, line or whatever

    • Developed Business Plan
    • Successfully sourced funding for ?
    • Defined product services (name product/products)
    • Developed and implemented roll-out strategy for OPs department
    • Delivered product on time and under budget
    • Provided complete customer satisfaction gaining repeat customers


This is the way that I'm used to formating a resume, put several of these that communicate your most recent experiences together and you've got the experience section down. If you have too much stuff to fit on a page you're going back to far into your history or you need to just hit the highlights from a broader selection. People want to know what you can do for them today, most applicants are looking to further what they are doing most recently.

I've read thousands of resumes and hired hundreds of employees. When they gave me a multi-page resume I most often found it suspect. It was as if they were trying to tell me their life's story. Leave that chatter for the interview. The resume's purpose is to get you in the door. Look at it like this, what can I say that will make the reader want to talk to me face to face?

I know this is a bit over the top but if you can say something like: "Increased revenue by 100 million dollars annually, grew business by 20% each of the last three consecutive quarters", they'll call you in, they're going to want to speak with you. This is the high level stuff that belongs on a resume. Now, few people can make those claims but what do you have to say that is as close to this level of magnitude as you can list? That's the kind of information that belongs on your first page.

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 06-15-2012, 06:21 PM
#10
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(06-14-2012, 04:17 PM)Pnume Wrote: I've been told that adding interests or hobbies to your resume is usually unnecessary.

Me as well.
I've done resumes for my brother, brother-in-law, two nephews, a friend in college and my own and never included hobbies/interests or even references. It's funny/sad because they all have jobs and I don't. LOL

You should include your 'objective', I think it displays a good bit about your attitude. The most important part is obviously your experience and how you choose to describe it. Don't go overboard, but never downplay any task. Confidence without ego. Even a job duty at McDonalds can be made to look impressive without lying or making it look obviously blown up. That displays how you view your job function and all job functions should be taken seriously--displays your work ethic.

I loved writing resumes and playing with words and desriptions. But since I've been out of work for so long, I'm sick of looking at it. I edited mine last night for a job, I hope someone calls me someday.

Good luck, I hope it works out for you.

edit:
Perhaps you could forward your resume to one of these experienced reviewers for a critique? That type of evaluation would be great.

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 06-16-2012, 06:10 PM
#11
  • PAW
  • Wet Shaver Addict
  • Illinois
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I wouldn't add hobbies and interests. Stick with your personal information, work history, education, keep it short and sweet, and let the interview do the work.

If you need help with a format, I'll be glad to help.

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 06-16-2012, 06:52 PM
#12
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You know, let's not skip hobbies or interests. Because I always hate not knowing what it is "they" want me to write down on the application itself. Some applications have this stupid question on there and I can never come up with something they want.

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 06-16-2012, 07:02 PM
#13
  • Johnny
  • Super Moderator
  • Wausau, Wisconsin, USA
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Jon, let's say you are applying for a job with a company that wants you to help them market a new widget they invented. Trust me when I say they don't give a damn if you like to fish, ski, or whatever your hobby is.

All the advise given above is good advise.

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