06-12-2015, 07:39 AM
#1
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I did some searching but can't quite grasp what this is. I have a guess but was looking for an explanation as to how one would know when they are experiencing great flow-through on a brush vs not so good. Softness, backbone, scritch seem quantifiable to me but how do you judge the amount of flow or how good is it?

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 06-12-2015, 07:52 AM
#2
  • Rufus
  • Senior Member
  • Greater Toronto Area
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Some knots release lather readily whereas others hang on to it.  To me, this is flow through.  For example, my Thater and shavemac 3-band silvertips release lather readily.  On the other hand, my Simpson super badgers hold the lather rather than transferring it to my face easil

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 06-12-2015, 09:28 AM
#3
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I agree with Rufus. I might add that when I am using a brush that holds on to lather, I use strong painting strokes that squeeze/release the lather from the breach of the brush. My CH2 and CH3 are notorious lather hogs. You just need to know how to make the brush work for you.

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 06-12-2015, 09:45 AM
#4
  • Nero
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  • le montagne
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Agreed.
And flow through will also affect the lather building process. Those with less flow through will be a little more challenging to lather than those with higher flow through. But with practice and a couple techniques (like Primo mentioned, for example), the issue can be mitigated fairly well in most circumstances.

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 06-12-2015, 10:04 AM
#5
  • kwsher
  • Senior Member
  • Austin, TX - USA
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(06-12-2015, 09:28 AM)primotenore Wrote: I agree with Rufus. I might add that when I am using a brush that holds on to lather, I use strong painting strokes that squeeze/release the lather from the breach of the brush. My CH2 and CH3 are notorious lather hogs. You just need to know how to make the brush work for you.

My thoughts precisely and also my technique with the Chubby's... well put!

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 06-12-2015, 10:21 AM
#6
  • Shanman
  • Reserve Collection Squirrel Hair
  • NE Florida
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Flow through is a 2 band Simpson or Shavemac Smile

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 06-12-2015, 11:38 AM
#7
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Let's do this Jeff Foxworthy style..

- If you find yourself having to squeeze the lather out of the brush before applying it to your face, you might have a brush with bad flow-through.
- If you find yourself washing more lather out of the brush than you were able to get onto your face, you might have a brush with bad flow-through.
- If your shaving brush still has the badger attached, you might be a red neck.

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 06-12-2015, 12:17 PM
#8
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According to my understanding of the grading methodology applied on another popular site, more density is unqualifiedly mo' bettah.

Therefore, absolute density must be best, right?

Of course, an absolutely dense knot would yield absolutely no flow-through.

The conclusion I draw from these premises is that the best knot must necessarily have the least flow-through, although I suspect any brush made with such a knot would be very heavy and difficult to wield.

This leads me to wonder whether a brush with negative flow-through might even be mo' betta than one with zero flow-through. I suppose that might be achieved by installing a vacuum in the handle.

I think I'll go work on that now before someone else thinks of it.

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 06-12-2015, 12:21 PM
#9
  • Attila
  • The Hungarian Blade
  • Vancouver, Canada
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(06-12-2015, 12:17 PM)Chiefbroom Wrote: According to my understanding of the grading methodology applied on another popular site, mo' density is mo' bettah.

Therefore, absolute density must be best, right?

Of course, an absolutely dense knot would yield absolutely no flow-through.

The conclusion I draw from these premises is that the best knot must necessarily have the least flow-through, although I suspect any brush made with such a knot would be very heavy and difficult to wield.

This leads me to wonder whether a brush with negative flow-through might even be mo' betta than one with zero flow-through. I suppose that might be achieved by installing a vacuum in the handle.

I think I'll go work on that now before someone else thinks of it.

LOL!  Oh yeah Ken....don't!

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 06-12-2015, 02:15 PM
#10
  • Steelman
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Capillary Action is a function of the radius of a tube and the density of the liquid.  A longer, narrower tube will have "better" capillary action than a shorter, wider tube.  Also, if the specs of the tube are the same, the less dense the material, the greater the capillary action.

[Image: Figure_12_08_10a.jpg]


This may explain why the short, fat, dense Simpson Chubby series of brushes are "lather hogs" compared to most other brushes.  If the theory of capillary action holds true for shaving brushes, then we should expect better capillary action, or flow through, from longer, thinner, less dense knots.

Of course, this is just my theory.  If we have any physicists in the house, please chime in.

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 06-12-2015, 02:26 PM
#11
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(06-12-2015, 02:15 PM)Steelman Wrote: Capillary Action is a function of the radius of a tube and the density of the liquid.  A longer, narrower tube will have "better" capillary action than a shorter, wider tube.  Also, if the specs of the tube are the same, the less dense the material, the greater the capillary action.

[Image: Figure_12_08_10a.jpg]


This may explain why the short, fat, dense Simpson Chubby series of brushes are "lather hogs" compared to most other brushes.  If the theory of capillary action holds true for shaving brushes, then we should expect better capillary action, or flow through, from longer, thinner, less dense knots.

Of course, this is just my theory.  If we have any physicists in the house, please chime in.

Most excellent post!

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 06-12-2015, 02:34 PM
#12
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(06-12-2015, 12:17 PM)Chiefbroom Wrote: According to my understanding of the grading methodology applied on another popular site, more density is unqualifiedly mo' bettah.

Therefore, absolute density must be best, right?

Of course, an absolutely dense knot would yield absolutely no flow-through.

The conclusion I draw from these premises is that the best knot must necessarily have the least flow-through, although I suspect any brush made with such a knot would be very heavy and difficult to wield.

This leads me to wonder whether a brush with negative flow-through might even be mo' betta than one with zero flow-through. I suppose that might be achieved by installing a vacuum in the handle.

I think I'll go work on that now before someone else thinks of it.

New product idea marketing hook:

Our handles suck!

I bet Gillette's already on it, though.

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 06-12-2015, 04:34 PM
#13
  • Shanman
  • Reserve Collection Squirrel Hair
  • NE Florida
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I love the turn this thread just took.

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 06-12-2015, 05:27 PM
#14
  • Teddyboy
  • Guilty, with an explanation
  • NYC
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Do you want an excellent brush for the money that is designed specifically to provide excellent flow through?  Go to the New Forest site - confusing website but excellent for the money.

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 06-12-2015, 06:37 PM
#15
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Absolutely this applies to brushes in general, with some exceptions of course.
We have an evidence of this, the shavemac 2 band silvertip which isn't too dense and plisson which features high loft and not too dense as well. Both are well known for their excellent flow through characteristics.
Now this applies to overall construction of the knot but another key factor is the actual hair performance, how much a single hair absorbs and releases water is key when it comes to flow through.
Another important factor is the density of the cream/soap. According to figure (b) a less dense lather would translate into better flow through!! But again lather density depends on hair properties!

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 06-12-2015, 09:50 PM
#16
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I have never had a brush with poor flow-through as I just adjust my technique to its characteristics and manipulate the lather from it without any inconvenience or problem when it is ready!  Biggrin

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 06-12-2015, 11:22 PM
#17
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If I rember correctly capillary force depends on surface tension of the liquid. Also, on viscosity...?)
These are changed with the soap and density of the mix. Which can be controlled
Whatever, where lather is taken up and released is starting at the tips of the knot, going inwards with the amount of splaying. A dialing in of brush strength with higher loft and thicker hairs @ same density should help flow through a lot.

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