07-10-2015, 02:58 PM
#1
  • carvelo
  • Active Member
  • Puerto Rico
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Hot or cold water shaving to avoid irritation?
Vegetable or tallow soap?

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 07-10-2015, 05:39 PM
#2
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Cold water helps with skin irritation. A good soap, regardless of tallow or not, will also help. Barring any skin sensitivities of course.

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 07-10-2015, 06:31 PM
#3
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Technique and quality of the soap is what makes the difference. There are fantastic soaps made with tallow and without, but they won't help you if your technique is out of sync.

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 07-10-2015, 07:04 PM
#4
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I always use hot water to shave, cold water to rinse.  Soaps?  I could use either of the two.  My technique is pretty solid.

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 07-10-2015, 07:25 PM
#5
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(07-10-2015, 06:31 PM)Shubes Wrote: Technique and quality of the soap is what makes the difference. There are fantastic soaps made with tallow and without, but they won't help you if your technique is out of sync.

+1

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 07-10-2015, 07:50 PM
#6
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Cold. Everybody knows that.

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 07-10-2015, 08:43 PM
#7
  • kav
  • Banned
  • east of the sun,west of the moon
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I'm lukewarm on the debate. Sometimes it's hot and sometimes cold. I even tried a famous mineral water until joining a political boycott of their parent company. I just found out my water district spent $22,000 spying on my friend and neighbor Tom Selleck
for stealing water he had paid for during our ongoing drought. I know how Tom shaves, but he's very private and I would be in hot water if I told. You can buy good kit but good technique is learned. Anyone who says different is all wet.

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 07-10-2015, 11:40 PM
#8
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Cooler temperatures for rinsing will close pores, reducing the surface of the skin to interact with the detergent and at the same time reduce the detergent effects physically
Think about cleaning your dishes with cold water. The soap just does not dissolve as much fats.




Btw. I am pretty sure Tom needs a lot of water for his shaves...! Enough said

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 07-11-2015, 12:51 AM
#9
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Hot water for the first two passes, and cold water on the third pass. I also finish the shave with a cold water rinse. I use veg and tallow. CF has been my go to lately and it really is a superb  shaving cream.

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 07-11-2015, 01:04 AM
#10
  • BobH
  • Senior Member
  • Thunder Bay Canada
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(07-10-2015, 07:25 PM)celestino Wrote:
(07-10-2015, 06:31 PM)Shubes Wrote: Technique and quality of the soap is what makes the difference. There are fantastic soaps made with tallow and without, but they won't help you if your technique is out of sync.

+1

Another +1 to that. I will add that most all soaps I have tried so far, 50+, have enough "quality" to provide for a decent shave so long as your lathering technique is good enough. As for using hot or cold water, some say it will help reduce irritation. Try it both ways and see what works for you to find out. 

Bob

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 07-11-2015, 03:26 AM
#11
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Neither - ice water gives the best shave!  2 years plus and loving it (I dump a big glass of ice into my basin of cold water every morning).

When traveling I sometimes use cold water from the tap, not nearly as good a shave.

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 07-11-2015, 04:27 AM
#12
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I find warm water works best for me but I always rinse with cold water. Again I find Tallow soaps work best for me, there are very few vegan soaps that match up to it. Soap Commander is one of those.

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 07-11-2015, 05:03 AM
#13
  • racebmx
  • Sapone Di Paolo
  • Charleston, South Carolina
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(07-11-2015, 03:26 AM)david1201 Wrote: Neither - ice water gives the best shave!  2 years plus and loving it (I dump a big glass of ice into my basin of cold water every morning).

When traveling I sometimes use cold water from the tap, not nearly as good a shave.

I can't quite tell if you are serious or not! But also living in the oven we call Charleston, I often think of how to cool off.  I've been pondering a "reverse scuttle",  i.e. putting my bowl in the refrigerator for a while.  Direct ice water is very interesting! 

Back on topic, my best results typically come from room temperature water with a cold rinse.  Tallow content makes no difference to me.

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 07-11-2015, 11:23 AM
#14
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I think softness of the water is more important than hot or cold.I shower in hot water,shave with hot water & finish with as cold as possible water................Ernie

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 07-11-2015, 12:37 PM
#15
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Dead serious!  Smile

Ice water causes your whiskers to stiffen, so its easier for the razor to cut them cleanly and closely.  Ice water also soothes any irritation after you shave (I spend about 1/2 a minute splashing ice water on my face post-shave).

Cold water also doesn't remove your skins natural oils like hot water does, allowing it to act as a natural lubricant for the shave (I don't use any soap on the face prior to shaving, and if I'm showering, I do it post-shave).

(07-10-2015, 06:22 AM)jarick Wrote: Does anyone else like higher lofts on the bulbs?

I've got two 2-band silvertip bulbs, one at 24x54 and one at 26x58.  The 24x54 is a nice size but just a bit short (actually measures 25x53).  I find it can be just a bit irritating face lathering with it.  I actually had a Thater 4125/1 that measured about 25x52 and that also felt a bit irritating with extended use.  The 26x58 is massive, way too big for me to want to use daily, but it feels a lot softer with the higher loft.  Been thinking of downsizing from the two to a compromise of 24x56.

(07-11-2015, 05:03 AM)racebmx Wrote: I can't quite tell if you are serious or not! But also living in the oven we call Charleston, I often think of how to cool off.  I've been pondering a "reverse scuttle",  i.e. putting my bowl in the refrigerator for a while.  Direct ice water is very interesting! 

Back on topic, my best results typically come from room temperature water with a cold rinse.  Tallow content makes no difference to me.

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 06-08-2016, 08:03 PM
#16
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New convert to cold water shaving. Living it.

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 06-08-2016, 08:23 PM
#17
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Why anyone would shave with cold water by choice is an utter mystery to me.  There seem to be a lot of threads related to this subject lately, but shaving with cold water is like wiping your bottom with leaves...better tools are available.  

Simply put, there is nothing desirable about putting a cold metal object to my my a cold and wet, goose-bumped morning beard stubble.  Thanks to Uncle Sam, I have years of experience upon which to fall back to verify this feeling.  Thoroughly unpleasant before, during and after the shave, and a recipe for cuts and irritation.

If it works for you, or you are a masochist, hurrah for you.  Give me a scuttle and piping warm water.

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 06-08-2016, 10:34 PM
#18
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There is a reason countless professional barbers have used hot towels and warm lather from time immemorial. All the ones I've talked to claim that warm/hot water gives a closer, cleaner shave by relaxing the pores and loosening dead skin cells that are then more easily removed with the razor. This exfoliates and cleans the skin, and by doing so, provides a closer shave.

Like another poster commented, it is like trying to wash dishes with cold water. Not only does it not get as clean, but the stubble within and under the grime is not cut as smoothly or consistently.

I suspect the recent phenomenon of amateur shavers preferring cold water to prevent irritation is due to a lack of proper technique (that can be accentuated by skin type), in which dead skin cells and grime act as a kind of buffer that does protect against razor burn and irritation.

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 06-09-2016, 12:27 AM
#19
  • nikos.a
  • Senior Member
  • Athens, Greece
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I shave with warm/hot water only. I really can't use cold, I tried but I didn't get a smooth, close shave. It's not for me. Also, I enjoy shaving with hot water. I'd say that the razor cuts the hairs more easily with hot water. A barber said me that as well a few months ago, when I went for a haircut.

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 06-09-2016, 02:37 AM
#20
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(06-08-2016, 10:34 PM)Len Wrote: There is a reason countless professional barbers have used hot towels and warm lather from time immemorial. All the ones I've talked to claim that warm/hot water gives a closer, cleaner shave by relaxing the pores and loosening dead skin cells that are then more easily removed with the razor. This exfoliates and cleans the skin, and by doing so, provides a closer shave.

Like another poster commented, it is like trying to wash dishes with cold water. Not only does it not get as clean, but the stubble within and under the grime is not cut as smoothly or consistently.

I suspect the recent phenomenon of amateur shavers preferring cold water to prevent irritation is due to a lack of proper technique (that can be accentuated by skin type), in which dead skin cells and grime act as a kind of buffer that does protect against razor burn and irritation.

Yes, there is a reason.  100 years or so ago, pretty much everyone had to shave with cold water and hot water was a luxury that most men did not have easy access too.  As such, when it became available, it was viewed as a luxury.

Cold water shaving stiffens the whiskers allowing the razor to more cleanly, closely cut stubble.  It also helps to soothe any irritation post-shave.  

If you want to shave with hot water, have at it, but these type of attacks on an alternative method of shaving is baffling to me, especially when I suspect most have not made an honest effort to master it before criticizing.

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