07-12-2015, 04:24 PM
#1
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Heya! It appears there is some minimal barrier to post in the wanted forums, but here's where I'm at:

I've just purchased an excellent C.J.B. holder (Thanks Parachutefactory!) and a pack of feather pro guards. I've been experimenting and have some work cut out for me. Although I have to get accustomed to technique, I'm sure that the odds and ends I've picked from the pharmacy are mostly inadequate.

I have a bottle of somersets maximum glide oil which I've been using as a pre-shave. I have a tube of cremo-creme which actually feels pretty slick. I have an inexpensive shaving soap and brush set which seem cheap, but actually develop a pretty good lather. I've been using hot towels.

Razor came equipped with a mild kai blade which I got just a nick with, and then the feather blades I've purchased gave me quite the scratching, despite being careful not to use too steep an angle. I had much less hair on my face during the feather shave, but my hair is quite coarse, particularly on the jaw and chin, but I managed to get scraped pretty much everywhere. Gonna let the nicks heal a bit.

I want to give my face the slickest possible start, but I don't want to spend a ton. How important is the brush quality (i.e. how little can I spend on a decent brush) or is the pharmacy cheapo brush fine if it gets a nice thick lather?

Is there a commonly available cream that's more slick than cremo? Are the sensitive blades better than the super sharp ones for a coarse beard, but easily irritated skin? Or should I be using the most sharp ones available?

I know this is going to take experimentation, I'd just like to start on the right track.

Cheers!!

Noah

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 07-12-2015, 09:47 PM
#2
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Welcome aboard the 'Nook

If the brush whips up a good lather and it feels okay on your skin, then it's a good enough brush in my book - a more expensive brush will feel better / last longer / look better, but it won't shave better.

The Feathers are wicked sharp, as you noticed, and it is not one I would recommend for beginners - it needs a very light touch and a mild razor to be tamed properly. Green Astra blades are a fair bit milder in my book, and performs admirable in all of my DE razors - it may be a good place to start while developing your technique. Later on you can get a sample pack or five of different blades to see if you can find your own favorite - but work on your technique before trying multiple blades 

While I don't have any experience with the cream you're using, you may want to look into using soap instead... Arko is cheap and cheerful (even if some people dislike the scent) and as a bonus it can double as a preshave soap for washing your face. Arko also makes a range of cheap creams if you prefer that, as do Dalan d'Men.

Other recommendation from the top of my head: Map out the direction of your beard growth, use no pressure at all (difficult, I know), mind the angle, and get hold of an alum block or a styptic pencil.

In addition, you may want to pop over to the introductions subforum and say hello Smile

PS; Yes, there is a 45 posts and 30 days membership requirement for posting a new thread in the B/S/T - there is good reasons for that.

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 07-13-2015, 07:38 AM
#3
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Thanks for the sage advice, I will put it to work!

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 07-13-2015, 07:59 AM
#4
  • kwsher
  • Senior Member
  • Austin, TX - USA
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Hi Noah, Hans offered some great advice. I do have direct experience with Cremo Cream and although I think it is capable would recommend getting a soap [incidentally, I think the CC really shines if making a Superlather which I don't do often].

I am guessing you are in the States and if so, Van der Hagen is readily available in supermarkets and drugstores [including Target] and is actually a decent soap that is inexpensive. Get the deluxe if you can. It is what I started with and served me well 10+ years ago.

Your brush, as long as it can whip the lather should be A-Ok. If you feel it in question, I also started with a Van der Hagen boar brush that I still have and that can be bought locally in a "kit".

You may also want to pick up some witchhazel to help post shave, particularly as you learn. Dickinson's is more traditional and Thayer's features additives such as aloe etc. I use both as needed.

Blades: I was PM'ng with another new shaver that I sent a handful of blades to and likely would recommend the same advice: going with a middle of the road such as Astra to start- they are capable of good performance and longevity without be a "niche" blade.

I also would not make a bunch of changes, including blades, until you get your technique down which includes blade angle, beard prep, lather, etc.

Good luck!

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 07-13-2015, 08:36 AM
#5
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(07-13-2015, 07:59 AM)kwsher Wrote: Hi Noah, Hans offered some great advice. I do have direct experience with Cremo Cream and although I think it is capable would recommend getting a soap [incidentally, I think the CC really shines if making a Superlather which I don't do often].

I am guessing you are in the States and if so, Van der Hagen is readily available in supermarkets and drugstores [including Target] and is actually a decent soap that is inexpensive. Get the deluxe if you can. It is what I started with and served me well 10+ years ago.

Your brush, as long as it can whip the lather should be A-Ok. If you feel it in question, I also started with a Van der Hagen boar brush that I still have and that can be bought locally in a "kit".

You may also want to pick up some witchhazel to help post shave, particularly as you learn. Dickinson's is more traditional and Thayer's features additives such as aloe etc. I use both as needed.

Blades: I was PM'ng with another new shaver that I sent a handful of blades to and likely would recommend the same advice: going with a middle of the road such as Astra to start- they are capable of good performance and longevity without be a "niche" blade.

I also would not make a bunch of changes, including blades, until you get your technique down which includes blade angle, beard prep, lather, etc.

Good luck!

Interestingly, the Van Der Hagen set is exactly what I got; it came with the brush, the bowl, and the (deluxe) soap. It seems alright; it's probably technique. I do have a milder blade the the seller sent and it barely nicked, but it also skips without more pressure than I'd like to give it, especially around the jaw and chin. Just used the feather again, only got a single nick but I'm having issues cutting while not adding pressure. It either glides over (with the grain) or skips over (across or against). This is after hot towels, pre-oil, and the VDH soap lather. I'll keep working on it Smile

Thanks for the great advice everyone.

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 07-13-2015, 09:58 AM
#6
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Kiss My Face is another good option if you can find it in a supermarket/health food store. It is actually a brush-less cream, but you can use your brush to whip up a nice lather.
Your brush should be fine for now and your main issue is technique. Keep practicing, be patient and things will get better. Good luck.

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