06-22-2012, 07:44 PM
#1
  • uncledave
  • Returned to DE Shaving After 40 years
  • Kentucky, USA
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I think everyone should be proud of their culture and not hesitate to share it. All regions of this country and other countries as well have "old sayings". I think it would be interesting to hear some of them. I'll start. I'm from Georgia, USA

When I was a child I was told that if I were to walk through a cemetery at night "a ghost will jump up and snatch you baldheaded!"

If a piece of furniture is out of alignment with the wall (sitting crooked) the old folks would say "It's cattywhampus!"

Now it's your turn! Biggrin

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 06-22-2012, 08:40 PM
#2
  • ben74
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  • Perth, Australia
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"cattywhampus" ... ?

Never heard it before, but I love it !!! Biggrin

I had a look at the epistemology...

"First element perhaps from obsolete cater "to set or move diagonally" (see catty-cornered); second element perhaps related to Scottish wampish "to wriggle, twist, or swerve about." Or perhaps simply the sort of jocular pseudo-classical formation popular in the slang of those times, with the first element suggesting Gk. kata-. Earliest use seems to be in adverbial form, catawampusly (1834), expressing no certain meaning but adding intensity to the action: "utterly, completely; with avidity, fiercely, eagerly." It appears as a noun from 1843, as a name for an imaginary hobgoblin or fright, perhaps from influence of catamount. The adjective is attested from the 1840s as an intensive, but this is only in British lampoons of American speech and might not be authentic. It was used in the U.S. by 1864 in a sense of "askew, awry, wrong" and by 1873 (noted as a peculiarity of North Carolina speech) as "in a diagonal position, on a bias, crooked."

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 06-22-2012, 08:45 PM
#3
  • uncledave
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(06-22-2012, 08:40 PM)ben74 Wrote: "cattywhampus" ... ?

Never heard it before, but I love it !!! Biggrin

I had a look at the epistemology...

"First element perhaps from obsolete cater "to set or move diagonally" (see catty-cornered); second element perhaps related to Scottish wampish "to wriggle, twist, or swerve about." Or perhaps simply the sort of jocular pseudo-classical formation popular in the slang of those times, with the first element suggesting Gk. kata-. Earliest use seems to be in adverbial form, catawampusly (1834), expressing no certain meaning but adding intensity to the action: "utterly, completely; with avidity, fiercely, eagerly." It appears as a noun from 1843, as a name for an imaginary hobgoblin or fright, perhaps from influence of catamount. The adjective is attested from the 1840s as an intensive, but this is only in British lampoons of American speech and might not be authentic. It was used in the U.S. by 1864 in a sense of "askew, awry, wrong" and by 1873 (noted as a peculiarity of North Carolina speech) as "in a diagonal position, on a bias, crooked."

I love this information! My mother's family came from North Carolina (Old Buncombe County) so I'd imagine that's where they picked up that saying. Also, my grandfather would say (after dark) "Be careful going home. The old cattywhampus will get you!"
I had no idea it was a legitimate word!

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 06-23-2012, 07:31 AM
#4
  • gijames
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  • TN, USA
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Biggrin

well, my favorite word from the latin-america side of the house... and used often in the Southwesth USA

Chupacabra

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 06-23-2012, 12:15 PM
#5
  • Songwind
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(06-23-2012, 07:31 AM)gijames Wrote: Chupacabra

Beware the goat-sucker!

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 06-23-2012, 01:46 PM
#6
  • gijames
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  • TN, USA
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(06-23-2012, 12:15 PM)Songwind Wrote:
(06-23-2012, 07:31 AM)gijames Wrote: Chupacabra

Beware the goat-sucker!
   

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 06-23-2012, 02:51 PM
#7
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(06-22-2012, 07:44 PM)uncledave Wrote: If a piece of furniture is out of alignment with the wall (sitting crooked) the old folks would say "It's cattywhampus!"

My mother used to say that all the time, only she said "kittywhampus". She was born and raised in California, so it must have been a commonly used term.

To this day, my father still refers to the sofa as a "chesterfield".

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 06-23-2012, 07:38 PM
#8
  • uncledave
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(06-23-2012, 01:46 PM)gijames Wrote:
(06-23-2012, 12:15 PM)Songwind Wrote:
(06-23-2012, 07:31 AM)gijames Wrote: Chupacabra

Beware the goat-sucker!

If my mother-in-law finds out you posted her picture she'll be mad! Biggrin

(06-23-2012, 02:51 PM)Tbone Wrote:
(06-22-2012, 07:44 PM)uncledave Wrote: If a piece of furniture is out of alignment with the wall (sitting crooked) the old folks would say "It's cattywhampus!"

My mother used to say that all the time, only she said "kittywhampus". She was born and raised in California, so it must have been a commonly used term.

To this day, my father still refers to the sofa as a "chesterfield".

When I was a kid a refrigerator was called a "Fridigaire" after the brand name I guess.

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 06-23-2012, 07:52 PM
#9
  • Songwind
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My grandparents still call their fridge a Kelvinator.

"Mean as a stripéd snake" is another good colorful phrase from my family.

When I was a little guy, my paternal grandfather told me that thunder was out of control potato wagons on the mountains.

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 06-23-2012, 07:56 PM
#10
  • uncledave
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(06-23-2012, 07:52 PM)Songwind Wrote: My grandparents still call their fridge a Kelvinator.

"Mean as a stripéd snake" is another good colorful phrase from my family.

When I was a little guy, my paternal grandfather told me that thunder was out of control potato wagons on the mountains.

The striped snake expression is common in the South too. I'm curious if you pronounce "striped" as "stri - ped" as we do here.

I love the potato wagon saying. I'm going to use that on my 9 year old niece just to see her look at me as if I'm nuts. Biggrin

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 06-23-2012, 08:09 PM
#11
  • Songwind
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(06-23-2012, 07:56 PM)uncledave Wrote: The striped snake expression is common in the South too. I'm curious if you pronounce "striped" as "stri - ped" as we do here.

I love the potato wagon saying. I'm going to use that on my 9 year old niece just to see her look at me as if I'm nuts. Biggrin

Yep, we say it the same way. My extended family is from West Virginia.

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 06-23-2012, 08:13 PM
#12
  • uncledave
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(06-23-2012, 08:09 PM)Songwind Wrote:
(06-23-2012, 07:56 PM)uncledave Wrote: The striped snake expression is common in the South too. I'm curious if you pronounce "striped" as "stri - ped" as we do here.

I love the potato wagon saying. I'm going to use that on my 9 year old niece just to see her look at me as if I'm nuts. Biggrin

Yep, we say it the same way. My extended family is from West Virginia.

I like your art work!

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 06-23-2012, 09:05 PM
#13
  • Johnny
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All those catchy words and phrases were used in my household growing up in Dallas. I have a good friend that lives in southern Louisiana and when he wants to say something bad about someone or just talk about someone, instead of using the slang SOB, he says, that dickweed.

And while growing up in the Texas/Oklahoma area, I discovered that half the male population in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana are named Bubba.

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 06-23-2012, 09:08 PM
#14
  • uncledave
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(06-23-2012, 09:05 PM)Johnny Wrote: All those catchy words and phrases were used in my household growing up in Dallas. I have a good friend that lives in southern Louisiana and when he wants to say something bad about someone or just talk about someone, instead of using the slang SOB, he says, that dickweed.

And while growing up in the Texas/Oklahoma area, I discovered that half the male population in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana are named Bubba.

And in my experience whoever is the top dog in an extended family is called Big Daddy and his wife is Big Momma. Anyone else ever used these terms? In my family my great grandfather was a local politician and we all called him Big Daddy.

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 06-23-2012, 09:20 PM
#15
  • Johnny
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I had a Aunt and Uncle in Oklahoma that went by those names.

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 06-23-2012, 09:25 PM
#16
  • uncledave
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(06-23-2012, 09:20 PM)Johnny Wrote: I had a Aunt and Uncle in Oklahoma that went by those names.

Rue McClannahan on The Golden Girls used to call her TV father "Big Daddy" and it always made me homesick when she would say it. It's not used here in Kentucky as far as I know.

Another regionalism I think, is the use of the word combo "ever I" such as in "That's the worst mess that ever I seen" I know it's grammatically incorrect but this is the way the old timers talked in GA and I've always used it myself unless I'm in "proper" company. In that case I'm more careful in my speech (and have less to say too!) Biggrin

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 06-24-2012, 01:03 PM
#17
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(06-23-2012, 09:05 PM)Johnny Wrote: All those catchy words and phrases were used in my household growing up in Dallas. I have a good friend that lives in southern Louisiana and when he wants to say something bad about someone or just talk about someone, instead of using the slang SOB, he says, that dickweed.

And while growing up in the Texas/Oklahoma area, I discovered that half the male population in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana are named Bubba.

We say that a lot around here amongst friends. My wife hates it.Biggrin

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 06-24-2012, 02:58 PM
#18
  • uncledave
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(06-24-2012, 01:03 PM)PanchoVilla Wrote:
(06-23-2012, 09:05 PM)Johnny Wrote: All those catchy words and phrases were used in my household growing up in Dallas. I have a good friend that lives in southern Louisiana and when he wants to say something bad about someone or just talk about someone, instead of using the slang SOB, he says, that dickweed.

And while growing up in the Texas/Oklahoma area, I discovered that half the male population in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana are named Bubba.

We say that a lot around here amongst friends. My wife hates it.Biggrin

In Georgia years ago the equivalent to "dickweed" was "peckerwood" as in "He's just an old peckerwood" The word was also used for the bird "Look at that red-headed peckerwood!"

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 06-24-2012, 03:09 PM
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  • slantman
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(06-24-2012, 02:58 PM)uncledave Wrote:
(06-24-2012, 01:03 PM)PanchoVilla Wrote:
(06-23-2012, 09:05 PM)Johnny Wrote: All those catchy words and phrases were used in my household growing up in Dallas. I have a good friend that lives in southern Louisiana and when he wants to say something bad about someone or just talk about someone, instead of using the slang SOB, he says, that dickweed.

And while growing up in the Texas/Oklahoma area, I discovered that half the male population in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana are named Bubba.

We say that a lot around here amongst friends. My wife hates it.Biggrin

In Georgia years ago the equivalent to "dickweed" was "peckerwood" as in "He's just an old peckerwood" The word was also used for the bird "Look at that red-headed peckerwood!"

In NYC it was "peckerhead" Thumbsup

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 06-24-2012, 03:11 PM
#20
  • uncledave
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(06-24-2012, 03:09 PM)slantman Wrote:
(06-24-2012, 02:58 PM)uncledave Wrote:
(06-24-2012, 01:03 PM)PanchoVilla Wrote: We say that a lot around here amongst friends. My wife hates it.Biggrin

In Georgia years ago the equivalent to "dickweed" was "peckerwood" as in "He's just an old peckerwood" The word was also used for the bird "Look at that red-headed peckerwood!"

In NYC it was "peckerhead" Thumbsup

I love learning about this sort of stuff. Unfortunately, in the age of TV and cellphones everywhere we are slowly losing our regional differences and accents. I think that's very sad.

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